<![CDATA[BirdingNZ.net]]> http://www.birdingnz.net/forum 2018-07-17T09:49:52+12:00 Smartfeed Extension for phpBB 3.1 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Baby ducklings in winter :: Reply by Bennyboy87654]]> 2018-06-17T14:17:56+12:00 2018-06-17T14:17:56+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7802&p=37185#p37185 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Baby ducklings in winter :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-06-17T18:23:20+12:00 2018-06-17T18:23:20+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7802&p=37186#p37186 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Baby ducklings in winter :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-06-17T19:54:15+12:00 2018-06-17T19:54:15+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7802&p=37190#p37190
Neil Fitzgerald wrote:Highlighted to me what a stupid time duck shooting season is; when they have already started breeding. Harvesting basics is you do it post-breeding.


True enough though unfortunately in the Waikato it seems Mallards will nest in any month (Have recorded ducklings in each month at Te Ko Utu, Cambridge). Same goes for Pukeko and even coot to an extent.

I believe the duck shooting season was once extended into July at one point? That was... silly.

Ah well...]]>
Neil Fitzgerald wrote:Highlighted to me what a stupid time duck shooting season is; when they have already started breeding. Harvesting basics is you do it post-breeding.


True enough though unfortunately in the Waikato it seems Mallards will nest in any month (Have recorded ducklings in each month at Te Ko Utu, Cambridge). Same goes for Pukeko and even coot to an extent.

I believe the duck shooting season was once extended into July at one point? That was... silly.

Ah well...]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Baby ducklings in winter :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-06-17T19:54:55+12:00 2018-06-17T19:54:55+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7802&p=37191#p37191

Bennyboy87654 wrote:I've seen some Pukeko chick recently, seems like a strange time to be laying eggs and raising chicks.
]]>


Bennyboy87654 wrote:I've seen some Pukeko chick recently, seems like a strange time to be laying eggs and raising chicks.
]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Baby ducklings in winter :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-06-17T20:33:01+12:00 2018-06-17T20:33:01+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7802&p=37194#p37194 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Hamilton Tomtit :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-06-18T13:49:26+12:00 2018-06-18T13:49:26+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7790&p=37212#p37212 Bob, you must be about equal distance from Pirongia, Pukemako (previously Maungakawa SR/Sanatorium Hill), and Tirohanga Road (just north of Maungatautari), which all had tomtits in recent counts I did. All getting close to 20 km from you.]]> Bob, you must be about equal distance from Pirongia, Pukemako (previously Maungakawa SR/Sanatorium Hill), and Tirohanga Road (just north of Maungatautari), which all had tomtits in recent counts I did. All getting close to 20 km from you.]]> <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Red-billed gulls killed in Kaikoura :: Author Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-06-18T14:13:14+12:00 2018-06-18T14:13:14+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7805&p=37214#p37214
Some graphic pics published, so don't click if you are squeamish.
https://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national ... n-kaikoura]]>

Some graphic pics published, so don't click if you are squeamish.
https://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national ... n-kaikoura]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Red-billed gulls killed in Kaikoura :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-06-18T15:12:58+12:00 2018-06-18T15:12:58+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7805&p=37216#p37216

I had seen dead RBGs on road and roadsides in Thames over 18 past years, and in early 2000s I caught few young RBGs with fishing hooks in their beaks and removed the hooks out of the beaks, before I released them to nature.

Most NZ people are cruel to birds as RBGs and keas and our native birds, they often run down or knock the native birds on roads, with their cars.

In mid-2000s I took a juvenile RBG to a Vet in Thames town and I asked the female vet to remove the hook from its guts, and one hour later I return for bird to release to nature, but instead of alive bird, the vet had killed the bird, and I received the dead bird. I were very upset about cruel vet killing native birds, and I no longer trust vets to our native birds.

RBG is short name for Red-billed gull.

Red-billed gulls are New Zealand subspecie of Silver gulls which lives in Australia, Tasmania, New Caledonia.]]>


I had seen dead RBGs on road and roadsides in Thames over 18 past years, and in early 2000s I caught few young RBGs with fishing hooks in their beaks and removed the hooks out of the beaks, before I released them to nature.

Most NZ people are cruel to birds as RBGs and keas and our native birds, they often run down or knock the native birds on roads, with their cars.

In mid-2000s I took a juvenile RBG to a Vet in Thames town and I asked the female vet to remove the hook from its guts, and one hour later I return for bird to release to nature, but instead of alive bird, the vet had killed the bird, and I received the dead bird. I were very upset about cruel vet killing native birds, and I no longer trust vets to our native birds.

RBG is short name for Red-billed gull.

Red-billed gulls are New Zealand subspecie of Silver gulls which lives in Australia, Tasmania, New Caledonia.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Red-billed gulls killed in Kaikoura :: Reply by Ian McLean]]> 2018-06-19T15:19:49+12:00 2018-06-19T15:19:49+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7805&p=37228#p37228 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Yellow bird feather identification :: Author helinnmae]]> 2018-06-20T09:37:43+12:00 2018-06-20T09:37:43+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7809&p=37235#p37235 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Yellow bird feather identification :: Reply by Nikki McArthur]]> 2018-06-20T09:47:08+12:00 2018-06-20T09:47:08+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7809&p=37236#p37236
Do they look a bit like the feathers in the picture below? This bird is a goldfinch, which is a species that's quite common around Lower Hutt. You can safely disregard yellowhead as it's a very rare bird found only in a few remote locations in the South Island & its offshore islands. Yellowhammer wing feathers are reddish-brown in colour, so perhaps not too likely either.

Goldfinches are lovely looking birds - this picture doesn't do them justice, so I recommend looking them up in the fieldguide, or online.

Best regards,
Nikki

Capture.JPG

Attachments



Capture.JPG (81.7 KiB)


]]>

Do they look a bit like the feathers in the picture below? This bird is a goldfinch, which is a species that's quite common around Lower Hutt. You can safely disregard yellowhead as it's a very rare bird found only in a few remote locations in the South Island & its offshore islands. Yellowhammer wing feathers are reddish-brown in colour, so perhaps not too likely either.

Goldfinches are lovely looking birds - this picture doesn't do them justice, so I recommend looking them up in the fieldguide, or online.

Best regards,
Nikki

Capture.JPG

Attachments



Capture.JPG (81.7 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Yellow bird feather identification :: Reply by helinnmae]]> 2018-06-20T14:30:32+12:00 2018-06-20T14:30:32+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7809&p=37238#p37238 My feathers Look Like Your picture! I don't think I've ever seen a goldfinch. I will put it on my list of birds to look for. Today I saw sparrows, blackbirds, chaffinches and piwakawaka.
Thank you for your help.
Bird Boy from Wild Kratts]]>
My feathers Look Like Your picture! I don't think I've ever seen a goldfinch. I will put it on my list of birds to look for. Today I saw sparrows, blackbirds, chaffinches and piwakawaka.
Thank you for your help.
Bird Boy from Wild Kratts]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Yellow bird feather identification :: Reply by Nikki McArthur]]> 2018-06-20T15:18:54+12:00 2018-06-20T15:18:54+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7809&p=37239#p37239 https://ebird.org/newzealand/places

If you go to this webpage and type "Lower Hutt" into the search box, it will give you a list of all the birds that have been seen by birdwatchers in and around Lower Hutt. According to this website there are 114 species you can look out for, though some of them are very rare!

Best wishes,
Nikki]]>
https://ebird.org/newzealand/places

If you go to this webpage and type "Lower Hutt" into the search box, it will give you a list of all the birds that have been seen by birdwatchers in and around Lower Hutt. According to this website there are 114 species you can look out for, though some of them are very rare!

Best wishes,
Nikki]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Super abundant silveres around lake ellesmere :: Author andrewcrossland]]> 2018-06-20T16:31:44+12:00 2018-06-20T16:31:44+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7810&p=37242#p37242 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Super abundant silveres around lake ellesmere :: Reply by Jim Kirker]]> 2018-06-20T18:33:52+12:00 2018-06-20T18:33:52+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7810&p=37244#p37244 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Mandarin Ducks :: Reply by les]]> 2018-06-17T11:20:45+12:00 2018-06-17T11:20:45+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7794&p=37182#p37182 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Mandarin Ducks :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-06-20T18:38:23+12:00 2018-06-20T18:38:23+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7794&p=37245#p37245 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Anderson Park, Napier birds :: Author FlyingKiwiGirl]]> 2018-06-25T14:27:18+12:00 2018-06-25T14:27:18+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7816&p=37288#p37288
I was also pleased to see two pair of dab-chicks (on main pond) and a singleton on the boat pond. I've visited Anderson Park many times over the years (used to live in Napier, now visit family who live nearby) and I don't ever recall seeing dab chicks.

So far (3 visits), I've only seen one of the plumed-whistling ducks, although I suspect the other one is on the island, I'm sure I heard it whistling.]]>

I was also pleased to see two pair of dab-chicks (on main pond) and a singleton on the boat pond. I've visited Anderson Park many times over the years (used to live in Napier, now visit family who live nearby) and I don't ever recall seeing dab chicks.

So far (3 visits), I've only seen one of the plumed-whistling ducks, although I suspect the other one is on the island, I'm sure I heard it whistling.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Kaikoura pelagic :: Author Wandoona]]> 2018-06-25T13:07:12+12:00 2018-06-25T13:07:12+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7815&p=37287#p37287 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Kaikoura pelagic :: Reply by wazzagonewild]]> 2018-06-26T12:20:17+12:00 2018-06-26T12:20:17+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7815&p=37291#p37291 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Kaikoura pelagic :: Reply by Wandoona]]> 2018-06-26T13:27:11+12:00 2018-06-26T13:27:11+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7815&p=37292#p37292 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Sulphur-Crested Cockatoo in 13th-century Europe :: Author GrahamB]]> 2018-06-26T15:44:49+12:00 2018-06-26T15:44:49+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7819&p=37294#p37294 https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/ ... te-rethink

Cheers,
GrahamB]]>
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/ ... te-rethink

Cheers,
GrahamB]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Forest bird song ID ? :: Author Jim Kirker]]> 2018-06-26T17:52:20+12:00 2018-06-26T17:52:20+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7820&p=37297#p37297 https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/105379061]]> https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/105379061]]> <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Forest bird song ID ? :: Reply by Davidthomas]]> 2018-06-26T18:11:31+12:00 2018-06-26T18:11:31+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7820&p=37298#p37298 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Forest bird song ID ? :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-06-26T21:01:20+12:00 2018-06-26T21:01:20+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7820&p=37301#p37301
Quite a variable little dude the warbla.

Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>

Quite a variable little dude the warbla.

Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Is this a Domestic Mallard ? :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-06-27T12:23:59+12:00 2018-06-27T12:23:59+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=6415&p=37305#p37305 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Nortrhern Shoveler Distribution :: Author Grahame]]> 2018-06-22T09:02:36+12:00 2018-06-22T09:02:36+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7811&p=37261#p37261

Attachments


Shoveler Distribution for W P
Shoveler Distribution BWPC.jpg (477.45 KiB)
Shoveler Distribution for W P

]]>

Attachments


Shoveler Distribution for W P
Shoveler Distribution BWPC.jpg (477.45 KiB)
Shoveler Distribution for W P

]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Nortrhern Shoveler Distribution :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-06-22T12:04:14+12:00 2018-06-22T12:04:14+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7811&p=37263#p37263 Green = wintering ???
Red = summering ??? / breeding ???]]>
Green = wintering ???
Red = summering ??? / breeding ???]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Nortrhern Shoveler Distribution :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-06-22T12:21:59+12:00 2018-06-22T12:21:59+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7811&p=37265#p37265
You are correct in your logic,
Red--Summer Orange--All year
Green--Winter]]>

You are correct in your logic,
Red--Summer Orange--All year
Green--Winter]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Nortrhern Shoveler Distribution :: Reply by erikforsyth]]> 2018-06-22T17:33:33+12:00 2018-06-22T17:33:33+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7811&p=37267#p37267
I see wintering birds in Thailand, Korea and Japan between October and March. They also winter in the Philippines. These birds breed in the Russian Far East and NE China.

I believe the birds wintering in the south occasionally reach Australia and NZ.

cheers
Erik Forsyth
Rockjumper Birding Tours
www.rockjumperbirding.com]]>

I see wintering birds in Thailand, Korea and Japan between October and March. They also winter in the Philippines. These birds breed in the Russian Far East and NE China.

I believe the birds wintering in the south occasionally reach Australia and NZ.

cheers
Erik Forsyth
Rockjumper Birding Tours
www.rockjumperbirding.com]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Nortrhern Shoveler Distribution :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-06-23T09:40:31+12:00 2018-06-23T09:40:31+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7811&p=37268#p37268
For the purposes of understanding the migratory birds that reach these shores, reference to what happens in the Western Palearctic is almost always gonna confuse the issue!

For example: Our Bar-tailed godwits turn red in Feb, European ones don't; Our common terns have black bills, European ones don't; Our Black-tailed Godwits are smaller than our Bar-tails, in Europe their sub-species are the reverse; Our visting Northern Shoveler are in full, bright breeding plumage in May/June, while European ones are (according to Sav's recent posting) already at a different stage. etc, etc.

Its time to chuck all those European field notes in the red bin and focus instead on literature from East Asia, Hongkong, Japan, Korea, SE Asia, NW Arctic North America. Its also time (if folks have the chance) to do some expeditionary trips to East Asia and document the timing of plumage changes to try and rectify the paucity of accurate information...

Here's an example: In Feb-May 1997 I spent 4 months studying waders and terns in Sumatra: Here's my notes on White-winged Black Tern plumage changes: (similar observations on Northern Shoveler etc would be useful....)

28 Feb (400+ birds) all in winter plumage. very few showing any colour.

3 Mar some beginning to moult into BP, the most advanced moult stage being in <1/2 BP

11 Mar wide assortment of plumages from full winter to < 1/2 BP

17 Mar (400+ birds) wide assortment of wing patterns.

23 Mar most birds showing black under-wings, white upper wings, but body feathers still white

25 Mar appearance of first birds in "dalmatian" plumage - black splots on body

31 Mar many in dalmatian plumage (also first big influxes of assumed Australian waders on passage - Red Knots, Black-tailed Godwits & Terek Sandpipers)

2 April (300+ birds) WW Bl Terns in 1/3 - 2/3 BP but none with fully black bodies yet (c.f. Whiskered Terns which are all in BP).

14 April (980 birds) Big influx. Majority now have fully black bodies (full BP), with remainder in "dalmatian" plumage. (contra: Most adult Whiskered Terns, Little Terns, & Gull-billed Terns have almost all departed, leaving mainly birds in imm/juv plumage)

17 April Huge nos (thousands) along coastline and well inland (up to 15km) over ricefields and fish ponds.

19 April and 22 April Several groups observed on northward migration across Straits of Malacca during Ferry crossing from Sumatra to Penang (Malaysia). Also observed was a northward passage of Pomarine Skua.

23 April most birds in full BP

24 April (200+ birds) numbers declining, big drop in numbers . All whiskered terns and most Little Terns now gone.

4 May small numbers, all adults in BP, small nos of juv/imms.

12 May (<100 birds). Almost all juv/imms. Very few adults remain.]]>

For the purposes of understanding the migratory birds that reach these shores, reference to what happens in the Western Palearctic is almost always gonna confuse the issue!

For example: Our Bar-tailed godwits turn red in Feb, European ones don't; Our common terns have black bills, European ones don't; Our Black-tailed Godwits are smaller than our Bar-tails, in Europe their sub-species are the reverse; Our visting Northern Shoveler are in full, bright breeding plumage in May/June, while European ones are (according to Sav's recent posting) already at a different stage. etc, etc.

Its time to chuck all those European field notes in the red bin and focus instead on literature from East Asia, Hongkong, Japan, Korea, SE Asia, NW Arctic North America. Its also time (if folks have the chance) to do some expeditionary trips to East Asia and document the timing of plumage changes to try and rectify the paucity of accurate information...

Here's an example: In Feb-May 1997 I spent 4 months studying waders and terns in Sumatra: Here's my notes on White-winged Black Tern plumage changes: (similar observations on Northern Shoveler etc would be useful....)

28 Feb (400+ birds) all in winter plumage. very few showing any colour.

3 Mar some beginning to moult into BP, the most advanced moult stage being in <1/2 BP

11 Mar wide assortment of plumages from full winter to < 1/2 BP

17 Mar (400+ birds) wide assortment of wing patterns.

23 Mar most birds showing black under-wings, white upper wings, but body feathers still white

25 Mar appearance of first birds in "dalmatian" plumage - black splots on body

31 Mar many in dalmatian plumage (also first big influxes of assumed Australian waders on passage - Red Knots, Black-tailed Godwits & Terek Sandpipers)

2 April (300+ birds) WW Bl Terns in 1/3 - 2/3 BP but none with fully black bodies yet (c.f. Whiskered Terns which are all in BP).

14 April (980 birds) Big influx. Majority now have fully black bodies (full BP), with remainder in "dalmatian" plumage. (contra: Most adult Whiskered Terns, Little Terns, & Gull-billed Terns have almost all departed, leaving mainly birds in imm/juv plumage)

17 April Huge nos (thousands) along coastline and well inland (up to 15km) over ricefields and fish ponds.

19 April and 22 April Several groups observed on northward migration across Straits of Malacca during Ferry crossing from Sumatra to Penang (Malaysia). Also observed was a northward passage of Pomarine Skua.

23 April most birds in full BP

24 April (200+ birds) numbers declining, big drop in numbers . All whiskered terns and most Little Terns now gone.

4 May small numbers, all adults in BP, small nos of juv/imms.

12 May (<100 birds). Almost all juv/imms. Very few adults remain.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Nortrhern Shoveler Distribution :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-06-23T12:04:51+12:00 2018-06-23T12:04:51+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7811&p=37269#p37269
When Northern shovelers migrate south on September, they are in esclipe plumages.

They start prebreeding moults on February.]]>

When Northern shovelers migrate south on September, they are in esclipe plumages.

They start prebreeding moults on February.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Nortrhern Shoveler Distribution :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-06-23T13:20:53+12:00 2018-06-23T13:20:53+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7811&p=37271#p37271
If supplementary plumage exist, this means shovelers have 8 months moulting season
If supplementary plumage do not exist, this means shovelers have 6 months moulting season.

Mallard ducks have 3 months moulting season.

Adult Red-billed gulls have 10 months moulting season (January to October) Post breeding moult January to May and pre breeding moult August to October.]]>

If supplementary plumage exist, this means shovelers have 8 months moulting season
If supplementary plumage do not exist, this means shovelers have 6 months moulting season.

Mallard ducks have 3 months moulting season.

Adult Red-billed gulls have 10 months moulting season (January to October) Post breeding moult January to May and pre breeding moult August to October.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Northern Shoveler Distribution :: Reply by erikforsyth]]> 2018-06-23T18:47:57+12:00 2018-06-23T18:47:57+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7811&p=37275#p37275
as I said in my previous post, the birds that reach NZ are from NE China or the Russian Far East


erikforsyth wrote:Hi all

I see wintering birds in Thailand, Korea and Japan between October and March. They also winter in the Philippines. These birds breed in the Russian Far East and NE China.

I believe the birds wintering in the south occasionally reach Australia and NZ.

cheers
Erik Forsyth
Rockjumper Birding Tours
http://www.rockjumperbirding.com
]]>

as I said in my previous post, the birds that reach NZ are from NE China or the Russian Far East


erikforsyth wrote:Hi all

I see wintering birds in Thailand, Korea and Japan between October and March. They also winter in the Philippines. These birds breed in the Russian Far East and NE China.

I believe the birds wintering in the south occasionally reach Australia and NZ.

cheers
Erik Forsyth
Rockjumper Birding Tours
http://www.rockjumperbirding.com
]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Nortrhern Shoveler Distribution :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-06-24T23:14:59+12:00 2018-06-24T23:14:59+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7811&p=37282#p37282 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Nortrhern Shoveler Distribution :: Reply by Liam Ballard]]> 2018-06-25T06:47:15+12:00 2018-06-25T06:47:15+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7811&p=37283#p37283 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Nortrhern Shoveler Distribution :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-06-25T11:04:26+12:00 2018-06-25T11:04:26+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7811&p=37285#p37285
cheers
jim]]>

cheers
jim]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Oriental pratincoles Hong Kong and China :: Reply by Steve Wratten]]> 2018-06-25T12:04:39+12:00 2018-06-25T12:04:39+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7811&p=37286#p37286 Worth keeping an eye open in the coming month or two]]> Worth keeping an eye open in the coming month or two]]> <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Nortrhern Shoveler Distribution :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-06-27T20:37:13+12:00 2018-06-27T20:37:13+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7811&p=37314#p37314
Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>

Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Wader ID Help? :: Author kengeorge]]> 2018-06-26T15:14:39+12:00 2018-06-26T15:14:39+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7818&p=37293#p37293

Attachments



P1040027a.jpg (743.85 KiB)


]]>

Attachments



P1040027a.jpg (743.85 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Wader ID Help? :: Reply by Steve Wood]]> 2018-06-26T17:21:55+12:00 2018-06-26T17:21:55+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7818&p=37295#p37295 Juv. Black fronted Tern.]]> Juv. Black fronted Tern.]]> <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Wader ID Help? :: Reply by Matthias]]> 2018-06-26T21:17:11+12:00 2018-06-26T21:17:11+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7818&p=37302#p37302
do you happen to have more photos of this bird? Was this photo taken recently?

Cheers
Matthias]]>

do you happen to have more photos of this bird? Was this photo taken recently?

Cheers
Matthias]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Wader ID Help? :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-06-27T12:33:11+12:00 2018-06-27T12:33:11+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7818&p=37306#p37306
The Caspian tern were adult in new breeding plumage while Red-billed gull were in 1st spring plumage, less than 11 month old.

This may mean the juvenile tern were either a Asian Little tern or White-winged Black tern in juvenile that had migrated with parent birds, but ended up overshot and landed in NZ in austral springtime.]]>

The Caspian tern were adult in new breeding plumage while Red-billed gull were in 1st spring plumage, less than 11 month old.

This may mean the juvenile tern were either a Asian Little tern or White-winged Black tern in juvenile that had migrated with parent birds, but ended up overshot and landed in NZ in austral springtime.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Wader ID Help? :: Reply by Davidthomas]]> 2018-06-27T14:07:49+12:00 2018-06-27T14:07:49+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7818&p=37309#p37309 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Wader ID Help? :: Reply by kengeorge]]> 2018-06-27T15:18:35+12:00 2018-06-27T15:18:35+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7818&p=37310#p37310 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Wader ID Help? :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-06-27T15:51:55+12:00 2018-06-27T15:51:55+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7818&p=37311#p37311
I had seen and photographed one juvenile Red-billed gull on 3rd February 2003, it had remained its complete juvenile plumage for few more weeks, while most juvenile Red-Billed gulls started to moult its juvenile plumage at 6 weeks old, as soon as outer juvenile primaries are fully grown, and had grey mantle & scapulars on 3/2/03.
During last 30 past years I had never seen a complete juvenile Red-billed gull before until 3/2/03. Most juvenile Red-billed gulls I had seen on early January are in moult, with several missing juvenile mantle & scapular feathers.

Both first winter gulls and terns have variable plumages and post-juvenile moult durations, with some gulls in complete first winter plumages, and few gulls in complete juvenile plumages, with most gulls have mixtures of first winter plumages and juvenile plumages, during midwinter.

20180627_155628.jpg

Juvenile Red-billed gull in complete juvenile plumage, 3/2/03
20180627_155628.jpg

Juvenile Red-billed gull in complete juvenile plumage, 3/2/03

Attachments



20180627_155628.jpg (231.98 KiB)



20180627_155611.jpg (267.25 KiB)


]]>

I had seen and photographed one juvenile Red-billed gull on 3rd February 2003, it had remained its complete juvenile plumage for few more weeks, while most juvenile Red-Billed gulls started to moult its juvenile plumage at 6 weeks old, as soon as outer juvenile primaries are fully grown, and had grey mantle & scapulars on 3/2/03.
During last 30 past years I had never seen a complete juvenile Red-billed gull before until 3/2/03. Most juvenile Red-billed gulls I had seen on early January are in moult, with several missing juvenile mantle & scapular feathers.

Both first winter gulls and terns have variable plumages and post-juvenile moult durations, with some gulls in complete first winter plumages, and few gulls in complete juvenile plumages, with most gulls have mixtures of first winter plumages and juvenile plumages, during midwinter.

20180627_155628.jpg

Juvenile Red-billed gull in complete juvenile plumage, 3/2/03
20180627_155628.jpg

Juvenile Red-billed gull in complete juvenile plumage, 3/2/03

Attachments



20180627_155628.jpg (231.98 KiB)



20180627_155611.jpg (267.25 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Wader ID Help? :: Reply by Davidthomas]]> 2018-06-27T16:46:14+12:00 2018-06-27T16:46:14+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7818&p=37312#p37312 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Wader ID Help? :: Reply by George Hobson]]> 2018-06-27T21:25:56+12:00 2018-06-27T21:25:56+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7818&p=37315#p37315
Davidthomas wrote:That makes my suggestion somewhat silly then doesn’t it! My pick is juvenile whiskered tern, wings lacking black in the primaries and the head is too pale and colour too extensive for a juvenile Wwbt for my eyes. Could be wrong however.

After some research, I'd agree with juv Whiskered Tern :)]]>
Davidthomas wrote:That makes my suggestion somewhat silly then doesn’t it! My pick is juvenile whiskered tern, wings lacking black in the primaries and the head is too pale and colour too extensive for a juvenile Wwbt for my eyes. Could be wrong however.

After some research, I'd agree with juv Whiskered Tern :)]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Birding in Te Anau :: Author cshearer]]> 2018-06-29T13:58:02+12:00 2018-06-29T13:58:02+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7826&p=37324#p37324
I have been studying on exchange in Palmerston North the past several months--unfortunately only just finding this forum. I am currently preparing to visit Te Anau in over next few days (30/06-2/07) and would greatly appreciate any advice on spotting birds in the area. As I do not have a car, my travel range would be dependent on walking, buses, and possibly tours. In particular, I have been hoping to see a rifleman and would love to know of any areas I should look or tips for spotting them (I have read that they are most common in beech forests in Fiordland, though I am unable to get there for longer stops than the 10-15 min breaks Milford Sound tours allow).

Thank you so much in advance for your advice.

Caroline]]>

I have been studying on exchange in Palmerston North the past several months--unfortunately only just finding this forum. I am currently preparing to visit Te Anau in over next few days (30/06-2/07) and would greatly appreciate any advice on spotting birds in the area. As I do not have a car, my travel range would be dependent on walking, buses, and possibly tours. In particular, I have been hoping to see a rifleman and would love to know of any areas I should look or tips for spotting them (I have read that they are most common in beech forests in Fiordland, though I am unable to get there for longer stops than the 10-15 min breaks Milford Sound tours allow).

Thank you so much in advance for your advice.

Caroline]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Birding in Te Anau :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-06-29T17:18:14+12:00 2018-06-29T17:18:14+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7826&p=37327#p37327
If you are staying in Te Anau you could walk round the lake and connect up with the Kepler track towards Luxmore Hut - you might see Rifleman higher up closer to the Hut.
Lake Gunn nature walk on the Milford Road is a great spot for birds - Robin, Rifleman, Y/C parakeet and maybe even Yellowhead if you're lucky - not sure if the tour buses stop there but there will be local buses (Trips & Tramps comes to mind) that would drop you off and pick you up (at a price!)
Be VERY cold round there in winter and birds tend to be harder to find that time of year

good luck

cheers
jim]]>

If you are staying in Te Anau you could walk round the lake and connect up with the Kepler track towards Luxmore Hut - you might see Rifleman higher up closer to the Hut.
Lake Gunn nature walk on the Milford Road is a great spot for birds - Robin, Rifleman, Y/C parakeet and maybe even Yellowhead if you're lucky - not sure if the tour buses stop there but there will be local buses (Trips & Tramps comes to mind) that would drop you off and pick you up (at a price!)
Be VERY cold round there in winter and birds tend to be harder to find that time of year

good luck

cheers
jim]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Birding in Te Anau :: Reply by cshearer]]> 2018-06-29T17:29:08+12:00 2018-06-29T17:29:08+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7826&p=37328#p37328
Thank you so much. I will be staying in Te Anau and will definitely walk along the beginning of the Kelper Track as you suggested. I will also look into options around Lake Gunn, spotting any of those birds would be amazing.

Thank you again

Caroline]]>

Thank you so much. I will be staying in Te Anau and will definitely walk along the beginning of the Kelper Track as you suggested. I will also look into options around Lake Gunn, spotting any of those birds would be amazing.

Thank you again

Caroline]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Birding in Te Anau :: Reply by Davidthomas]]> 2018-06-29T17:48:16+12:00 2018-06-29T17:48:16+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7826&p=37329#p37329
The lake Tekapo foreshore is also good for all the usual waterfowl including crested grebe. The start of the Kepler is stunning, I’ve seen falcon and rifleman there previously so worth a try. And if you do go up the Milford road, Monkey creek is a fantastic spot for Whio and kea.]]>

The lake Tekapo foreshore is also good for all the usual waterfowl including crested grebe. The start of the Kepler is stunning, I’ve seen falcon and rifleman there previously so worth a try. And if you do go up the Milford road, Monkey creek is a fantastic spot for Whio and kea.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Birding in Te Anau :: Reply by cshearer]]> 2018-06-29T17:52:04+12:00 2018-06-29T17:52:04+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7826&p=37330#p37330 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Birding in Te Anau :: Reply by CMKMStephens]]> 2018-06-29T20:23:32+12:00 2018-06-29T20:23:32+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7826&p=37335#p37335 https://imgur.com/a/8QYHZ]]> https://imgur.com/a/8QYHZ]]> <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Birding in Te Anau :: Reply by cshearer]]> 2018-06-29T22:29:13+12:00 2018-06-29T22:29:13+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7826&p=37339#p37339 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Birding in Te Anau :: Reply by David Riddell]]> 2018-06-30T09:04:45+12:00 2018-06-30T09:04:45+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7826&p=37341#p37341 https://ebird.org/newzealand/hotspot/L5915447]]> https://ebird.org/newzealand/hotspot/L5915447]]> <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Birding in Te Anau :: Reply by Ian Southey]]> 2018-06-30T09:44:37+12:00 2018-06-30T09:44:37+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7826&p=37342#p37342
While you are there it will be cold, especially in the bush, and the days short but if you are persistent you may do fine. If it suits one very good option might be to stay a night or two at Knob's Flat http://www.knobsflat.co.nz/ where you will have the best of the forest birds right at your door. I know the area well enough but not this place. I also don't know what closes for the winter but there may be some good pick and drop of shuttles and buses. These people are one of them https://tripsandtramps.com/ and you should be able to get picked up and put down at suitable places. Milford Sound also has accomodation.

If you plan to head up that way there are a few stops that can be recommended but have lots of clothes.

Ian]]>

While you are there it will be cold, especially in the bush, and the days short but if you are persistent you may do fine. If it suits one very good option might be to stay a night or two at Knob's Flat http://www.knobsflat.co.nz/ where you will have the best of the forest birds right at your door. I know the area well enough but not this place. I also don't know what closes for the winter but there may be some good pick and drop of shuttles and buses. These people are one of them https://tripsandtramps.com/ and you should be able to get picked up and put down at suitable places. Milford Sound also has accomodation.

If you plan to head up that way there are a few stops that can be recommended but have lots of clothes.

Ian]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Birding in Te Anau :: Reply by cshearer]]> 2018-06-30T18:41:47+12:00 2018-06-30T18:41:47+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7826&p=37344#p37344
Thank you both so much for your suggestions. I will be in the Milford area tomorrow and may have the chance to spot a few more birds.

Elated to say, thanks to everyone’s advice, that I was lucky enough to spot a rifleman today. I heard it calling about 10 min from the control gates along the start of the Kepler Track and found it within the next few min (unfortunately there aren’t any pictures to share as I only photograph things with a phone). It was absolutely amazing to be able to watch it moving along the tree trunks. There were even more of them calling and flitting around further along the start of the track. Thank you again for the advice about looking along the track!

I also was able to see quite a few great crested grebes earlier in the morning, a white faced heron, and a male tomtit (right at the start of the Kepler Track) in addition to the regulars.]]>

Thank you both so much for your suggestions. I will be in the Milford area tomorrow and may have the chance to spot a few more birds.

Elated to say, thanks to everyone’s advice, that I was lucky enough to spot a rifleman today. I heard it calling about 10 min from the control gates along the start of the Kepler Track and found it within the next few min (unfortunately there aren’t any pictures to share as I only photograph things with a phone). It was absolutely amazing to be able to watch it moving along the tree trunks. There were even more of them calling and flitting around further along the start of the track. Thank you again for the advice about looking along the track!

I also was able to see quite a few great crested grebes earlier in the morning, a white faced heron, and a male tomtit (right at the start of the Kepler Track) in addition to the regulars.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Last huia sighting to make the news? :: Reply by tinowaka]]> 2018-06-28T22:45:38+12:00 2018-06-28T22:45:38+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=6975&p=37321#p37321
Back in the mid 1980s, Easter 1984 I think, I was hunting in the Tararua's with a mate, in behind Shannon. We set off early one morning from our camp walking beside a stream through the bush, when a bird flew toward us at about a metre off the ground. It few in an odd manner - more like a bat than a bird - from side to side. It also had an unusual song - it sounded like a bosun's whistle. It landed in a dead spar slightly uphill of us. I looked through my rifle scope at it. It was a bright overcast day so the bird was in silhouette. It was difficult to make out its size but looked about the size of a tui, maybe bigger. However, what I could make out was that it was blackish and there were two yellowish wattles on its face. I had spent a lot of time in the bush in the Tararua's hunting possums since before I was 15 years old and hadn't seen or heard a bird like this before.

When I got home I looked up my NZ birds book. The only bird that could match it with was the male huia. I didn't notice any white tipped tail feathers when I was looking, but the bright background would not have helped, and I didn't have any idea of what I was looking at, at the time. I'm not sure why I didn't tell anyone in authority about the time. Partly it was due to the difficulty in working out who to tell - this was pre DoC days. I didn't have a hunting permit either which also didn't help. I was young, in my early twenties.

This evening I was watching a programme on Maori TV, Artifacts, with the episode being on the huia. They had an old recording of someone mimicking a huia. In the past I have thought about that moment and convinced myself that it probably was just a tui. But when I heard the recording on the TV it sounded like a bosun's whistle just like my bird.

Anyway that's my recollection. I always thought I'd go back and have a look, but I haven't got around to it and probably won't. The country is pretty rugged and I'm not getting any younger. I could pretty much pinpoint the spot on a map if anyone is interested.]]>

Back in the mid 1980s, Easter 1984 I think, I was hunting in the Tararua's with a mate, in behind Shannon. We set off early one morning from our camp walking beside a stream through the bush, when a bird flew toward us at about a metre off the ground. It few in an odd manner - more like a bat than a bird - from side to side. It also had an unusual song - it sounded like a bosun's whistle. It landed in a dead spar slightly uphill of us. I looked through my rifle scope at it. It was a bright overcast day so the bird was in silhouette. It was difficult to make out its size but looked about the size of a tui, maybe bigger. However, what I could make out was that it was blackish and there were two yellowish wattles on its face. I had spent a lot of time in the bush in the Tararua's hunting possums since before I was 15 years old and hadn't seen or heard a bird like this before.

When I got home I looked up my NZ birds book. The only bird that could match it with was the male huia. I didn't notice any white tipped tail feathers when I was looking, but the bright background would not have helped, and I didn't have any idea of what I was looking at, at the time. I'm not sure why I didn't tell anyone in authority about the time. Partly it was due to the difficulty in working out who to tell - this was pre DoC days. I didn't have a hunting permit either which also didn't help. I was young, in my early twenties.

This evening I was watching a programme on Maori TV, Artifacts, with the episode being on the huia. They had an old recording of someone mimicking a huia. In the past I have thought about that moment and convinced myself that it probably was just a tui. But when I heard the recording on the TV it sounded like a bosun's whistle just like my bird.

Anyway that's my recollection. I always thought I'd go back and have a look, but I haven't got around to it and probably won't. The country is pretty rugged and I'm not getting any younger. I could pretty much pinpoint the spot on a map if anyone is interested.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Last huia sighting to make the news? :: Reply by CMKMStephens]]> 2018-06-29T16:13:25+12:00 2018-06-29T16:13:25+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=6975&p=37325#p37325 https://www.dropbox.com/s/bhtrqxdcr2kmg ... D.mp3?dl=0

How does it compare?

While there is a famous and regularly played Huia imitation, a couple of years ago I helped Auckland War Memorial Museum with putting the provenance to another Huia imitation. This one is by Archibald Bogle, who at the turn of the 20th century was a surveyor in the relevant area. Like everyone else at the time, he was busy luring Huia and killing them. He later went onto other things, eg a member of the Geographic Board.

In theory, buried in Te Papa, could be his earlier recording:

Some years ago Mr W.J.Phillips was ethnologist at the Dominion Museum, his brother had been a survey cadet with Bill Stewart and this gave him the idea to ask Stewart if he had, in the course of his bush surveys, ever seen any huia. Stewart said "no", but named me as one who had seen them, sometimes daily, for a period of months, and the upshot was an urgent invitation to visit the museum and tell Phillips what I knew concerning the birds. This was carefully recorded for the archives and was followed by a request to register the distinctive whistle of the huia on a tape recorder. At such unexpected short notice, my lips, of course, went dry, and my whistle would not have excited much envy in a real huia's breast. But, ultimately, I got a good result which, I assumed, was carefully preserved at the Dominion Museum. However, Mr Phillips did not mention the recording in his "Book of the Huia", and recent enquiries failed to discover any trace of it.; Just recently, there, I again recorded the Huia's call, this time for H.R. McKenzie and the Auckland War Memorial Museum.]]>
https://www.dropbox.com/s/bhtrqxdcr2kmg ... D.mp3?dl=0

How does it compare?

While there is a famous and regularly played Huia imitation, a couple of years ago I helped Auckland War Memorial Museum with putting the provenance to another Huia imitation. This one is by Archibald Bogle, who at the turn of the 20th century was a surveyor in the relevant area. Like everyone else at the time, he was busy luring Huia and killing them. He later went onto other things, eg a member of the Geographic Board.

In theory, buried in Te Papa, could be his earlier recording:

Some years ago Mr W.J.Phillips was ethnologist at the Dominion Museum, his brother had been a survey cadet with Bill Stewart and this gave him the idea to ask Stewart if he had, in the course of his bush surveys, ever seen any huia. Stewart said "no", but named me as one who had seen them, sometimes daily, for a period of months, and the upshot was an urgent invitation to visit the museum and tell Phillips what I knew concerning the birds. This was carefully recorded for the archives and was followed by a request to register the distinctive whistle of the huia on a tape recorder. At such unexpected short notice, my lips, of course, went dry, and my whistle would not have excited much envy in a real huia's breast. But, ultimately, I got a good result which, I assumed, was carefully preserved at the Dominion Museum. However, Mr Phillips did not mention the recording in his "Book of the Huia", and recent enquiries failed to discover any trace of it.; Just recently, there, I again recorded the Huia's call, this time for H.R. McKenzie and the Auckland War Memorial Museum.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Last huia sighting to make the news? :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-06-29T17:03:19+12:00 2018-06-29T17:03:19+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=6975&p=37326#p37326 In the 70's there was a significant beech mast (in the upper SI at least) and I kind of think that the resultant stoat/rat plague probably wiped out any remaining huia, kokako, bushwren etc - certainly pretty much knocked out yellowhead from most of the top haf of the SI.
But maybe a lone male huia that maybe fledged before then could have been around in the early 80's?

cheers
Jim]]>
In the 70's there was a significant beech mast (in the upper SI at least) and I kind of think that the resultant stoat/rat plague probably wiped out any remaining huia, kokako, bushwren etc - certainly pretty much knocked out yellowhead from most of the top haf of the SI.
But maybe a lone male huia that maybe fledged before then could have been around in the early 80's?

cheers
Jim]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Last huia sighting to make the news? :: Reply by c0nz]]> 2018-07-01T20:10:37+12:00 2018-07-01T20:10:37+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=6975&p=37348#p37348 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: New Australian Field Guide :: Reply by StuartNich]]> 2018-07-01T20:17:48+12:00 2018-07-01T20:17:48+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=6817&p=37349#p37349 Despite the index, there are three aids to guide you to the species text and illustration(s) you are probably looking for. 1) Inside the front cover is a typical picture of each group of birds, with the first main page number. 2) There is a chart on the op-Contents page, 3) There is a Checklist of species, pp 534-545 in taxonomic order with Common Name given.
Warning: Only 3-5 spp per page, so read the Introduction for the layout rationale.
Another warning: the bird dimensions given follow a different system c.f. the bill-tail measurement we are ususlly given.
The introductory pages are good reading and the section "A guide for birders to the evolution and classification of Australian birds" by Dr Leo Joseph, is excellent. It contains that wonderful chart from Jarvis et al 2014,]]>
Despite the index, there are three aids to guide you to the species text and illustration(s) you are probably looking for. 1) Inside the front cover is a typical picture of each group of birds, with the first main page number. 2) There is a chart on the op-Contents page, 3) There is a Checklist of species, pp 534-545 in taxonomic order with Common Name given.
Warning: Only 3-5 spp per page, so read the Introduction for the layout rationale.
Another warning: the bird dimensions given follow a different system c.f. the bill-tail measurement we are ususlly given.
The introductory pages are good reading and the section "A guide for birders to the evolution and classification of Australian birds" by Dr Leo Joseph, is excellent. It contains that wonderful chart from Jarvis et al 2014,]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Pelagic Kaikoura :: Author Wandoona]]> 2018-07-02T09:03:34+12:00 2018-07-02T09:03:34+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7829&p=37352#p37352 Here's a list. Great Albatross 1 Northern Royal,6 Southern Royal,5 Wandering .. Gibson's.. Albatross ..10 black-browed, 17 New Zealand White-capped, 2 Salvin's,51 Buller's.. Petrels 8 Giant- Northern,1 Giant- Southern, 3 Westland, 120 Cape petrel 1 Common Diving Petrel.
3 Fairy prions, Shearwaters 2 Fluttering, 1 Antarctic Fulmar, Shags 1 pied,1 spotted,1 little. 6 black-fronted terns. 30 black-backed gulls,6 black-billed gulls 20 red-billed gulls.
In addition we were right on sperm whales, Dusky and Hectors Dolphin. Thanks to Gary Melville skipper. To top it off I found cirl buntings (finally).]]>
Here's a list. Great Albatross 1 Northern Royal,6 Southern Royal,5 Wandering .. Gibson's.. Albatross ..10 black-browed, 17 New Zealand White-capped, 2 Salvin's,51 Buller's.. Petrels 8 Giant- Northern,1 Giant- Southern, 3 Westland, 120 Cape petrel 1 Common Diving Petrel.
3 Fairy prions, Shearwaters 2 Fluttering, 1 Antarctic Fulmar, Shags 1 pied,1 spotted,1 little. 6 black-fronted terns. 30 black-backed gulls,6 black-billed gulls 20 red-billed gulls.
In addition we were right on sperm whales, Dusky and Hectors Dolphin. Thanks to Gary Melville skipper. To top it off I found cirl buntings (finally).]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic Seabird Trip - 7 July 2018 :: Reply by ourspot]]> 2018-07-06T13:38:22+12:00 2018-07-06T13:38:22+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7786&p=37363#p37363
Cheers
Scott Brooks
021 322 324 | scott@ourspot.nz]]>

Cheers
Scott Brooks
021 322 324 | scott@ourspot.nz]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Updated Unusual Bird Report template :: Author Colin Miskelly]]> 2018-07-07T09:29:50+12:00 2018-07-07T09:29:50+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7833&p=37364#p37364
I hope that you are all familiar with the process for reporting rare vagrant birds (or birds seen outside their expected range).

Most reports receive by the Birds New Zealand Records Appraisal Committee are received via the online reporting form:

https://www.osnz.org.nz/webforms/online-reporting-form

Another option is to fill in a template and submit this to the RAC secretary as an email attachment. Until recently, the template provided for this used columns, and was (to put it bluntly) a pain in the arse to use, as the column format corrupted content.

In response to user demand, we have simplified the template, and added a few fields so that it is closer to the online reporting form. The new Word template can be accessed via the 'Rare and vagrant birds' page on the Birds New Zealand website:

https://www.osnz.org.nz/rarebirds.htm

It is near the bottom of the page, under RAC resources / Unusual Bird Report forms / UBR form in Word (RTF) format

Regards
Colin]]>

I hope that you are all familiar with the process for reporting rare vagrant birds (or birds seen outside their expected range).

Most reports receive by the Birds New Zealand Records Appraisal Committee are received via the online reporting form:

https://www.osnz.org.nz/webforms/online-reporting-form

Another option is to fill in a template and submit this to the RAC secretary as an email attachment. Until recently, the template provided for this used columns, and was (to put it bluntly) a pain in the arse to use, as the column format corrupted content.

In response to user demand, we have simplified the template, and added a few fields so that it is closer to the online reporting form. The new Word template can be accessed via the 'Rare and vagrant birds' page on the Birds New Zealand website:

https://www.osnz.org.nz/rarebirds.htm

It is near the bottom of the page, under RAC resources / Unusual Bird Report forms / UBR form in Word (RTF) format

Regards
Colin]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Updated Unusual Bird Report template :: Reply by imogen]]> 2018-07-07T17:27:13+12:00 2018-07-07T17:27:13+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7833&p=37366#p37366
At the moment it is taking up to 6 months to get UBRs reviewed. Is there anything in place to get this process moving quicker? By the time I get a decision, I've forgotten what it is for!]]>

At the moment it is taking up to 6 months to get UBRs reviewed. Is there anything in place to get this process moving quicker? By the time I get a decision, I've forgotten what it is for!]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Updated Unusual Bird Report template :: Reply by Colin Miskelly]]> 2018-07-07T18:19:49+12:00 2018-07-07T18:19:49+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7833&p=37367#p37367
Thanks for this feedback, though I am surprised that you think the process is taking up to 6 months. The committee has been doing a good job of keeping to notified timelines lately.

Batches of submissions are sent to members every 2 months (at the end of Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct and Dec). Members have 2 months to make independent comments, which are collated and sent to the convenor during the following 2-monthly cycle. I try to write the draft response letters within 1-2 weeks (though it can be a challenge - I am currently working on 31 response letters from the latest batch, and we send these out when all are complete, rather than drip-feeding them as each is written).

Depending on when within the 2-month cycle an Unusual Bird Report is received, it should receive a response within 2.5 to 4.5 months.

We occasionally hit problems if either the secretary or myself are in the field and offline at the time of a deadline, in which case we send an email to submitters apologising for the delay and indicating when the responses are expected to be sent. This has happened once in the past 12 months.

In theory the process could be sped up (e.g. assessing smaller batches every month, with a one-month turn around), but there has been little enthusiasm for this when discussed among RAC members. Part of the reason for this is that it is common for field biologists to be offline for a month or more. There are six people in the team to co-ordinate, and so we would inevitably fail to meet deadlines more often than is currently the case if we tried to work to a quicker turn-around.

Cheers
Colin]]>

Thanks for this feedback, though I am surprised that you think the process is taking up to 6 months. The committee has been doing a good job of keeping to notified timelines lately.

Batches of submissions are sent to members every 2 months (at the end of Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct and Dec). Members have 2 months to make independent comments, which are collated and sent to the convenor during the following 2-monthly cycle. I try to write the draft response letters within 1-2 weeks (though it can be a challenge - I am currently working on 31 response letters from the latest batch, and we send these out when all are complete, rather than drip-feeding them as each is written).

Depending on when within the 2-month cycle an Unusual Bird Report is received, it should receive a response within 2.5 to 4.5 months.

We occasionally hit problems if either the secretary or myself are in the field and offline at the time of a deadline, in which case we send an email to submitters apologising for the delay and indicating when the responses are expected to be sent. This has happened once in the past 12 months.

In theory the process could be sped up (e.g. assessing smaller batches every month, with a one-month turn around), but there has been little enthusiasm for this when discussed among RAC members. Part of the reason for this is that it is common for field biologists to be offline for a month or more. There are six people in the team to co-ordinate, and so we would inevitably fail to meet deadlines more often than is currently the case if we tried to work to a quicker turn-around.

Cheers
Colin]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Sylvia Durrant :: Reply by zarkov]]> 2018-07-08T22:37:10+12:00 2018-07-08T22:37:10+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=6287&p=37374#p37374
She's been an inspiration to us all here on the North shore, and maybe has inspired others to follow in her footsteps.

https://givealittle.co.nz/cause/birdladyofrothesaybay

https://www.newsroom.co.nz/2018/07/06/1 ... ires-at-85

I'd be interested to hear from anyone who has information about what to do with injured birds in the area in the future.]]>

She's been an inspiration to us all here on the North shore, and maybe has inspired others to follow in her footsteps.

https://givealittle.co.nz/cause/birdladyofrothesaybay

https://www.newsroom.co.nz/2018/07/06/1 ... ires-at-85

I'd be interested to hear from anyone who has information about what to do with injured birds in the area in the future.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Future of the Whenua Hou diving petrel :: Author fras444]]> 2018-07-10T11:23:58+12:00 2018-07-10T11:23:58+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7837&p=37379#p37379 Now that it has been found to be a seperate species... what future beholds such a rare species that is found in such a very specific habitat, both 'breeding wise and geographical' What measures can be taken to increase numbers and what options are there available to 'spread the range' so to speak. I understand it's not a case of a Kakapo or Orange fronted kakariki where one can capture a couple, hope they bread in captivity and find a sutible offshore island as a safe guard to the species future. What can you do with a species of finite numbers 'capturing a few could jeopardise the rest' found on the sand dunes that are at the mercy of mother nature. I've read in the old field guide suggesting a breeding colony was found on the Auckland islands? Wiped out in the 70s by cats and seals?
Can they naturally increase numbers then naturally spread? Can a handful be relocated? Can a oceanic species be bread in captivity etc... With a few loosely related case examples of the rare Chathams petrel and the NZ storm petrel.
What are your thoughts and going of the first line...has any been spotted from those on hear that frequent those birding charters]]>
Now that it has been found to be a seperate species... what future beholds such a rare species that is found in such a very specific habitat, both 'breeding wise and geographical' What measures can be taken to increase numbers and what options are there available to 'spread the range' so to speak. I understand it's not a case of a Kakapo or Orange fronted kakariki where one can capture a couple, hope they bread in captivity and find a sutible offshore island as a safe guard to the species future. What can you do with a species of finite numbers 'capturing a few could jeopardise the rest' found on the sand dunes that are at the mercy of mother nature. I've read in the old field guide suggesting a breeding colony was found on the Auckland islands? Wiped out in the 70s by cats and seals?
Can they naturally increase numbers then naturally spread? Can a handful be relocated? Can a oceanic species be bread in captivity etc... With a few loosely related case examples of the rare Chathams petrel and the NZ storm petrel.
What are your thoughts and going of the first line...has any been spotted from those on hear that frequent those birding charters]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: North/South Island endemics and the Cook Straight :: Reply by fras444]]> 2018-07-10T12:02:12+12:00 2018-07-10T12:02:12+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7744&p=37380#p37380 Definitely interested in species recently been recorded breeding outside of their respected "endemic" island. For example, the SIPO. What were the reports of them breeding in the North Island. How successful were their attempts, are they still breeding? If not what would have been the factor in them not veing successful? I have do e a bit of research online wise and have known for a while that the SPIO were found to have bred on the North Island but apart from a mention, there is little or no more information regarding breeding success etc.
Haha thanks Russ :) I do know that Creasted greabs are "native" in the grand sceam of things, I was more implying the term 'endemic' in the same scene that it is used alot in the birding world where 'endemic' means breeding only in one country or, here, regarding this post, only breeding on either the North/South island, and still be found naturally occurring elsewhere as a vagrant or migratory. A term that can also be lossed. For example 'Whitefronted tern' was endemic to NZ but lost that status when found breeding in Tasmania. So to go back to the Creasted Grebe. It's native in NZ as it's found breeding elsewhere but in NZ, its endemic to the South island as it's only found breeding in the South Island. If that makes sense?
Going back to the whitehead and Brown Creeper. Very good point you brought up Russ... Both are forest birds and both had ranges very close to the respective island, has anyone ever came across any pieces of information that there could have been a possible sighting. Could a storm loge and send a few off in each location or is the distance just to vast for these birds. Even in the strongest of gale?]]>
Definitely interested in species recently been recorded breeding outside of their respected "endemic" island. For example, the SIPO. What were the reports of them breeding in the North Island. How successful were their attempts, are they still breeding? If not what would have been the factor in them not veing successful? I have do e a bit of research online wise and have known for a while that the SPIO were found to have bred on the North Island but apart from a mention, there is little or no more information regarding breeding success etc.
Haha thanks Russ :) I do know that Creasted greabs are "native" in the grand sceam of things, I was more implying the term 'endemic' in the same scene that it is used alot in the birding world where 'endemic' means breeding only in one country or, here, regarding this post, only breeding on either the North/South island, and still be found naturally occurring elsewhere as a vagrant or migratory. A term that can also be lossed. For example 'Whitefronted tern' was endemic to NZ but lost that status when found breeding in Tasmania. So to go back to the Creasted Grebe. It's native in NZ as it's found breeding elsewhere but in NZ, its endemic to the South island as it's only found breeding in the South Island. If that makes sense?
Going back to the whitehead and Brown Creeper. Very good point you brought up Russ... Both are forest birds and both had ranges very close to the respective island, has anyone ever came across any pieces of information that there could have been a possible sighting. Could a storm loge and send a few off in each location or is the distance just to vast for these birds. Even in the strongest of gale?]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: North/South Island endemics and the Cook Straight :: Reply by fras444]]> 2018-07-10T12:17:02+12:00 2018-07-10T12:17:02+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7744&p=37381#p37381 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: National Geographic seabirds :: Author Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-07-10T12:24:41+12:00 2018-07-10T12:24:41+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7838&p=37382#p37382 has to mention NZ. Includes a photo of Dave Boyle with Chatham albs.]]> has to mention NZ. Includes a photo of Dave Boyle with Chatham albs.]]> <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: New petrel species? :: Author Nakilad]]> 2018-06-28T14:35:49+12:00 2018-06-28T14:35:49+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7824&p=37319#p37319 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0197766]]> http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0197766]]> <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: New petrel species? :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-07-10T12:28:16+12:00 2018-07-10T12:28:16+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7824&p=37383#p37383 viewtopic.php?f=13&t=7823]]> viewtopic.php?f=13&t=7823]]> <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Another Dog killed Kiwi :: Author Weka1]]> 2018-07-08T10:20:25+12:00 2018-07-08T10:20:25+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7835&p=37371#p37371
There has been another dog killed kiwi at the Bay of Islands. See https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/arti ... d=12081641
The Bay of Islands is a stronghold of Brown Kiwi.
Uniquely kiwi are present around houses within the towns of Kerikeri and Russell.

Since the paper by Taborsky (Notornis 1988) dogs have been recognised as the major killers of adult kiwi in Northland. One dog can eliminate a local kiwi population. http://behav.zoology.unibe.ch/sysuif/up ... _Kiwis.pdf

There are many Landcare group initiatives within the Far North District Council rohe where predator control is being carried out. Within some of these areas kiwi are showing significant increases in numbers. Kiwi can breed twice and produce four chicks a year in Northland. Productivity is not a problem. Mortality is. Dogs have the potential to wipe out any increase in kiwi numbers achieved, by much hard effort and substantial costs, through predator control.

After pressure from some dog advocates the Far North District Council has rolled back proposed more comprehensive dog control by-laws.

This is not an anti-dog rant. There are many responsible dog owners who support the initiatives to increase kiwi numbers. But wandering dogs are a problem and there must be effective legal means to control them.

See FNDC Dog policy and Dog Control Bylaw Review http://www.fndc.govt.nz/communication/c ... bylaw-2016]]>

There has been another dog killed kiwi at the Bay of Islands. See https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/arti ... d=12081641
The Bay of Islands is a stronghold of Brown Kiwi.
Uniquely kiwi are present around houses within the towns of Kerikeri and Russell.

Since the paper by Taborsky (Notornis 1988) dogs have been recognised as the major killers of adult kiwi in Northland. One dog can eliminate a local kiwi population. http://behav.zoology.unibe.ch/sysuif/up ... _Kiwis.pdf

There are many Landcare group initiatives within the Far North District Council rohe where predator control is being carried out. Within some of these areas kiwi are showing significant increases in numbers. Kiwi can breed twice and produce four chicks a year in Northland. Productivity is not a problem. Mortality is. Dogs have the potential to wipe out any increase in kiwi numbers achieved, by much hard effort and substantial costs, through predator control.

After pressure from some dog advocates the Far North District Council has rolled back proposed more comprehensive dog control by-laws.

This is not an anti-dog rant. There are many responsible dog owners who support the initiatives to increase kiwi numbers. But wandering dogs are a problem and there must be effective legal means to control them.

See FNDC Dog policy and Dog Control Bylaw Review http://www.fndc.govt.nz/communication/c ... bylaw-2016]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Another Dog killed Kiwi :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-07-12T12:41:51+12:00 2018-07-12T12:41:51+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7835&p=37399#p37399 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Predatory black swans... :: Author Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-07-10T20:17:52+12:00 2018-07-10T20:17:52+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7839&p=37384#p37384
Has anyone ever encountered evidence of swans eating fish? If so, perhaps Mr Williams will need to update the NZ Birdsonline page, as it currently says "Black swans are entirely herbivorous".]]>

Has anyone ever encountered evidence of swans eating fish? If so, perhaps Mr Williams will need to update the NZ Birdsonline page, as it currently says "Black swans are entirely herbivorous".]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Predatory black swans... :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-07-11T11:49:44+12:00 2018-07-11T11:49:44+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7839&p=37386#p37386 - Human overfishing
- Anything to do with land use from farming or forestry causing sediment run-off
- Anything to do with human or dairy waste runoff
Must be those swans - case closed!

cheers
Jim]]>
- Human overfishing
- Anything to do with land use from farming or forestry causing sediment run-off
- Anything to do with human or dairy waste runoff
Must be those swans - case closed!

cheers
Jim]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Predatory black swans... :: Reply by Ian McLean]]> 2018-07-11T14:00:32+12:00 2018-07-11T14:00:32+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7839&p=37387#p37387 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Predatory black swans... :: Reply by David Riddell]]> 2018-07-11T16:27:05+12:00 2018-07-11T16:27:05+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7839&p=37388#p37388 Notornis, 7(4), 107-109. The relevant passage reads:
We saw the Spoonbills fly to the nests to feed the young, but they were too high to observe any feeding particulars. Mr Ken Nolan, the caretaker there, however, says he has seen the Spoonbills carrying fish in their bills to the nests. This fish, it would seem, could only have been small flounder. No doubt in the mud where the Spoonbill feeds with a swinging motion of its bill there must be numbers of small flounders, and these could no doubt be caught by the Spoonbill. This theory is confirmed by the fact that on a Bluff estuary the Black Swans that are shot often have young flounders in their crops.

Wilson doesn't provide any evidence for this claim, but if it can be taken at face value then it would seem black swans feeding on small flounder is something that has been observed before.]]>
Notornis, 7(4), 107-109. The relevant passage reads:
We saw the Spoonbills fly to the nests to feed the young, but they were too high to observe any feeding particulars. Mr Ken Nolan, the caretaker there, however, says he has seen the Spoonbills carrying fish in their bills to the nests. This fish, it would seem, could only have been small flounder. No doubt in the mud where the Spoonbill feeds with a swinging motion of its bill there must be numbers of small flounders, and these could no doubt be caught by the Spoonbill. This theory is confirmed by the fact that on a Bluff estuary the Black Swans that are shot often have young flounders in their crops.

Wilson doesn't provide any evidence for this claim, but if it can be taken at face value then it would seem black swans feeding on small flounder is something that has been observed before.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Predatory black swans... :: Reply by Ian McLean]]> 2018-07-11T19:22:02+12:00 2018-07-11T19:22:02+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7839&p=37391#p37391 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Predatory black swans... :: Reply by Walpole]]> 2018-07-12T02:07:32+12:00 2018-07-12T02:07:32+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7839&p=37393#p37393 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Predatory black swans... :: Reply by David Riddell]]> 2018-07-12T09:36:58+12:00 2018-07-12T09:36:58+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7839&p=37395#p37395
I do agree that Wilson's comment in his Notornis paper is inadequate in many respects. He doesn't make it clear whether this is something he's observed himself, or if not, how reliable the source of the information was. He calls it a "fact" that black swans on a Bluff estuary "often" have young flounder in their crops, but how well confirmed is that fact, and how many swan crops were actually examined? There's a real lack of clarity around this, and yes, it would be great to see some actual photos. But when there's a reference in the scientific literature to black swans eating small flounder, however vague, we shouldn't rush to judgement.

I see even Fish and Game are sceptical of this, one commentator querying whether the "flounder" might be parasitic flukes.
https://fishandgame.org.nz/news/both-ba ... -aug-2016/]]>

I do agree that Wilson's comment in his Notornis paper is inadequate in many respects. He doesn't make it clear whether this is something he's observed himself, or if not, how reliable the source of the information was. He calls it a "fact" that black swans on a Bluff estuary "often" have young flounder in their crops, but how well confirmed is that fact, and how many swan crops were actually examined? There's a real lack of clarity around this, and yes, it would be great to see some actual photos. But when there's a reference in the scientific literature to black swans eating small flounder, however vague, we shouldn't rush to judgement.

I see even Fish and Game are sceptical of this, one commentator querying whether the "flounder" might be parasitic flukes.
https://fishandgame.org.nz/news/both-ba ... -aug-2016/]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Predatory black swans... :: Reply by philbattley]]> 2018-07-12T09:52:33+12:00 2018-07-12T09:52:33+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7839&p=37396#p37396 Cheers, Phil]]> Cheers, Phil]]> <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Predatory black swans... :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-07-12T12:26:43+12:00 2018-07-12T12:26:43+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7839&p=37398#p37398 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Predatory black swans... :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-07-12T12:46:51+12:00 2018-07-12T12:46:51+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7839&p=37400#p37400 - Do Black Swans eat baby flounder
- If the answer is Yes does it have any material affect on the flounder population

The first is an interesting question which would be good to know.

The second... I struggle to believe that no matter how many swans are jammed into these harbours that the affect on the flounder population would be that significant to warrant a swan cull for THAT reason.
I imagine there are a multitude of creatures that feed on baby flounder.
As I mentioned I suggest that the people claiming reduced flounder numbers first look at their own activities (overfishing) and then the local environmental conditions (silt run-off from human land use in paricular) - these I suspect are a much more likely cause of reduced flounder numbers.

cheers
Jim]]>
- Do Black Swans eat baby flounder
- If the answer is Yes does it have any material affect on the flounder population

The first is an interesting question which would be good to know.

The second... I struggle to believe that no matter how many swans are jammed into these harbours that the affect on the flounder population would be that significant to warrant a swan cull for THAT reason.
I imagine there are a multitude of creatures that feed on baby flounder.
As I mentioned I suggest that the people claiming reduced flounder numbers first look at their own activities (overfishing) and then the local environmental conditions (silt run-off from human land use in paricular) - these I suspect are a much more likely cause of reduced flounder numbers.

cheers
Jim]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Predatory black swans... :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-07-12T20:40:17+12:00 2018-07-12T20:40:17+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7839&p=37402#p37402 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Anyine know Bill Marks? :: Author sandyw]]> 2018-07-14T19:16:23+12:00 2018-07-14T19:16:23+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7844&p=37409#p37409 aDSCN2652x2.jpg
aDSCN0553.jpg

Attachments



aDSCN0553.jpg (254.06 KiB)



aDSCN2652x2.jpg (224.24 KiB)


]]>
aDSCN2652x2.jpg
aDSCN0553.jpg

Attachments



aDSCN0553.jpg (254.06 KiB)



aDSCN2652x2.jpg (224.24 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Ground-feeding tui, common or unusual? :: Author kengeorge]]> 2018-07-13T20:13:38+12:00 2018-07-13T20:13:38+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7842&p=37403#p37403

Attachments



No_01b.jpg (580.41 KiB)



No_02b.jpg (357.26 KiB)


]]>

Attachments



No_01b.jpg (580.41 KiB)



No_02b.jpg (357.26 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Ground-feeding tui, common or unusual? :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-07-13T22:50:33+12:00 2018-07-13T22:50:33+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7842&p=37405#p37405 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Ground-feeding tui, common or unusual? :: Reply by GrahamB]]> 2018-07-14T14:41:51+12:00 2018-07-14T14:41:51+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7842&p=37407#p37407 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Ground-feeding tui, common or unusual? :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-07-15T21:10:17+12:00 2018-07-15T21:10:17+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7842&p=37415#p37415 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: A Cat eats a Kereru :: Author Weka1]]> 2018-07-15T21:36:47+12:00 2018-07-15T21:36:47+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7846&p=37417#p37417 But I came across a cat eating a fresh carcass of a kereru on our section.

See

I set up my trail camera, now old and unreliable, and on the first night it failed to activate. Here is the video from the second night.
The cat repeatedly returned, day and night to feed. Over three days the carcass was reduced to feathers.

I cannot confirm that this cat killed this kereru.
Kereru do feed on or near the ground and a cat is capable of killing one, so it is a possibility.

What do you think?

Kiwi and weka, both endangered, call near the cat.]]>
But I came across a cat eating a fresh carcass of a kereru on our section.

See

I set up my trail camera, now old and unreliable, and on the first night it failed to activate. Here is the video from the second night.
The cat repeatedly returned, day and night to feed. Over three days the carcass was reduced to feathers.

I cannot confirm that this cat killed this kereru.
Kereru do feed on or near the ground and a cat is capable of killing one, so it is a possibility.

What do you think?

Kiwi and weka, both endangered, call near the cat.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: A Cat eats a Kereru :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-07-16T12:44:13+12:00 2018-07-16T12:44:13+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7846&p=37418#p37418

This happened 249 years later now, since 1769 when Captain James Cook's employees released the domestic cats from ship "Endeavour", and the cats went to bush and caught & killed the native birds.

Our kiwis (strange birds) are have hard time avoiding being meals for cats and dogs and stoats & ferrets which find their scents very interesting, so these mammalian predators are kiwi-killers.

Fantails used to nesting at 1 metre or lower in 1770s, but they now nesting at 3-5 metres today.
These low nesting fantails had been weeded out by cats, left today's high nesting fantails to remain alive.

Only option is the cats would be kept in cat runs similar to in Australia whose the cats are kept inside cat runs and not allowed to roam freely.

See this photo of cat run in Australia.
outside-cat-enclosures-cage-of-house-awesome-all-about-spaces-for-sale-qld-enclosure.jpg

Attachments



outside-cat-enclosures-cage-of-house-awesome-all-about-spaces-for-sale-qld-enclosure.jpg (33.17 KiB)


]]>


This happened 249 years later now, since 1769 when Captain James Cook's employees released the domestic cats from ship "Endeavour", and the cats went to bush and caught & killed the native birds.

Our kiwis (strange birds) are have hard time avoiding being meals for cats and dogs and stoats & ferrets which find their scents very interesting, so these mammalian predators are kiwi-killers.

Fantails used to nesting at 1 metre or lower in 1770s, but they now nesting at 3-5 metres today.
These low nesting fantails had been weeded out by cats, left today's high nesting fantails to remain alive.

Only option is the cats would be kept in cat runs similar to in Australia whose the cats are kept inside cat runs and not allowed to roam freely.

See this photo of cat run in Australia.
outside-cat-enclosures-cage-of-house-awesome-all-about-spaces-for-sale-qld-enclosure.jpg

Attachments



outside-cat-enclosures-cage-of-house-awesome-all-about-spaces-for-sale-qld-enclosure.jpg (33.17 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: A Cat eats a Kereru :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-07-16T13:43:13+12:00 2018-07-16T13:43:13+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7846&p=37419#p37419
http://braid.org.nz/ecology/threats/pre ... tcontents/

Cat with dead tui
https://www.naturespic.com/NewZealand/i ... p?id=29609

Australia
https://tim-doherty.com/2015/02/03/fera ... n-animals/]]>

http://braid.org.nz/ecology/threats/pre ... tcontents/

Cat with dead tui
https://www.naturespic.com/NewZealand/i ... p?id=29609

Australia
https://tim-doherty.com/2015/02/03/fera ... n-animals/]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: A Cat eats a Kereru :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-07-16T16:05:10+12:00 2018-07-16T16:05:10+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7846&p=37421#p37421 e.g.
  • Clout MN, Karl BJ, Pierce RJ, Robertson HA 1995. Breeding and survival of New Zealand pigeons Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae. Ibis 137: 264-271.
  • Powlesland RG, Wills DE, August ACL, August CK 2003. Effects of a 1080 operation on kaka and kereru survival and nesting success, Whirinaki Forest Park. New Zealand Journal of Ecology 27: 125–137.
With all the effort going into predator control to benefit kereru (and other species), I expect cat owners are going to be increasingly confronted with this reality.]]>
e.g.
  • Clout MN, Karl BJ, Pierce RJ, Robertson HA 1995. Breeding and survival of New Zealand pigeons Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae. Ibis 137: 264-271.
  • Powlesland RG, Wills DE, August ACL, August CK 2003. Effects of a 1080 operation on kaka and kereru survival and nesting success, Whirinaki Forest Park. New Zealand Journal of Ecology 27: 125–137.
With all the effort going into predator control to benefit kereru (and other species), I expect cat owners are going to be increasingly confronted with this reality.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Marsh crake, Ahuriri Napier :: Reply by bennydog]]> 2018-06-17T12:34:59+12:00 2018-06-17T12:34:59+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6337&p=37184#p37184 Given that, it would be a no brainer to approach DOC or whoever and get the go ahead for a private group to take the initiative..
I have a similar situation at Emerau wetland north go Gisborne. DOC loaned me a few broken down traps which I had to re-instate,- no problem ,just time. GDC are not interested so I do it myself with no other volunteers..
It is frustrating I understand... But Ive found going alone is the only way....regards Neil Foster]]>
Given that, it would be a no brainer to approach DOC or whoever and get the go ahead for a private group to take the initiative..
I have a similar situation at Emerau wetland north go Gisborne. DOC loaned me a few broken down traps which I had to re-instate,- no problem ,just time. GDC are not interested so I do it myself with no other volunteers..
It is frustrating I understand... But Ive found going alone is the only way....regards Neil Foster]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Waikato Seawatching & Shorebirding :: Author RussCannings]]> 2018-06-17T18:44:40+12:00 2018-06-17T18:44:40+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7803&p=37189#p37189
Today was the winter Kawhia/Aotea Harbour Census and since it wasn't kicking off until 11am I headed to the coast early to get in some extra birding.

Started off at Ruapuke Beach and Ruapuke Rock (SW of Mt Karioi) and enjoyed one of the better seawatches I've had off the Waikato west coast. By "better" I mean--"not horrible". Typically I'm happy to spot a few Fluttering Shearwaters and some distant gannets but thanks to some stiff westerlies overnight and a few latent breezes in the morning, I was heartened when the first bird that came into the scope was a Buller's Albatross! There seemed to be a lot of tern and gannet action several kilometers out but it was near impossible to identify anything other than gannets and WFTs. After around 50 minutes of scoping I ended up with the following:

White-capped Albatross- 5
Buller's Albatross- 1
Prion sp.- 5 (Probably Fairy but who knows--maybe actually Antarctic?--Too far out and likely more among the bait balls near Gannet Island)
Fluttering Shearwater- 100 (Conservative, following bait balls in distance)
Shearwater sp.- 1 (Appeared larger and darker)
Common Diving Petrel- 1
Australasian Gannet- 75+ (All adults)
Black-backed Gull- 8
White-fronted Tern- 250+ (Conservative)

From there I worked my way south along the Aotea Harbour to Kawhia. Lots of the usual estuary birds including 34 spoonbill but was particularly pleased to come across a male tomtit in a patch of native bush near the SE corner of the Aotea Harbour.

Met up with Bruce Postill and the gang in Kawhia and was on the Te Motu Island team. While there was virtually nothing on the island itself (Let alone any kaki), the sandbanks in front were productive with unusual additions to the godwits and sipo being 1 turnstone and 1 whimbrel. The latter bird had no pale contrast whatsoever in the rump which possibly suggests hudsonicus (North American variety)--but I understand this is variable? No photographs of the bird in flight sadly. Also 8 NZ Dot and around 380 Bandies.

And that was about it. On the way home I bumped into Bob R at Lake Ngaroto where 3 Cattle Egrets were on show north of the lake (Down from the 20+ that are usually around).

Hope you all had a great weekend :)

Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>

Today was the winter Kawhia/Aotea Harbour Census and since it wasn't kicking off until 11am I headed to the coast early to get in some extra birding.

Started off at Ruapuke Beach and Ruapuke Rock (SW of Mt Karioi) and enjoyed one of the better seawatches I've had off the Waikato west coast. By "better" I mean--"not horrible". Typically I'm happy to spot a few Fluttering Shearwaters and some distant gannets but thanks to some stiff westerlies overnight and a few latent breezes in the morning, I was heartened when the first bird that came into the scope was a Buller's Albatross! There seemed to be a lot of tern and gannet action several kilometers out but it was near impossible to identify anything other than gannets and WFTs. After around 50 minutes of scoping I ended up with the following:

White-capped Albatross- 5
Buller's Albatross- 1
Prion sp.- 5 (Probably Fairy but who knows--maybe actually Antarctic?--Too far out and likely more among the bait balls near Gannet Island)
Fluttering Shearwater- 100 (Conservative, following bait balls in distance)
Shearwater sp.- 1 (Appeared larger and darker)
Common Diving Petrel- 1
Australasian Gannet- 75+ (All adults)
Black-backed Gull- 8
White-fronted Tern- 250+ (Conservative)

From there I worked my way south along the Aotea Harbour to Kawhia. Lots of the usual estuary birds including 34 spoonbill but was particularly pleased to come across a male tomtit in a patch of native bush near the SE corner of the Aotea Harbour.

Met up with Bruce Postill and the gang in Kawhia and was on the Te Motu Island team. While there was virtually nothing on the island itself (Let alone any kaki), the sandbanks in front were productive with unusual additions to the godwits and sipo being 1 turnstone and 1 whimbrel. The latter bird had no pale contrast whatsoever in the rump which possibly suggests hudsonicus (North American variety)--but I understand this is variable? No photographs of the bird in flight sadly. Also 8 NZ Dot and around 380 Bandies.

And that was about it. On the way home I bumped into Bob R at Lake Ngaroto where 3 Cattle Egrets were on show north of the lake (Down from the 20+ that are usually around).

Hope you all had a great weekend :)

Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: First SIPO of spring :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-06-17T20:58:36+12:00 2018-06-17T20:58:36+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=5945&p=37199#p37199 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Carolina wood ducks, Hamilton :: Reply by GameGirl]]> 2018-06-19T10:58:53+12:00 2018-06-19T10:58:53+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=701&p=37226#p37226
rukuhia wrote:My neighbor over the back breeds them for sale along with Mandarin ducks. He releases the odd few but most are killed by hawks or botulism he said, consequently his clients are generally back for more after a few months. The prices ranges from $100 - $ 200 each!



Hi there,
I seen you post and was just wondering if you still have contact details for your neighbor that breeds the Carolina wood ducks? I have a breeding pair but would like another pair. Many thanks Sarah]]>
rukuhia wrote:My neighbor over the back breeds them for sale along with Mandarin ducks. He releases the odd few but most are killed by hawks or botulism he said, consequently his clients are generally back for more after a few months. The prices ranges from $100 - $ 200 each!



Hi there,
I seen you post and was just wondering if you still have contact details for your neighbor that breeds the Carolina wood ducks? I have a breeding pair but would like another pair. Many thanks Sarah]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Carolina wood ducks, Hamilton :: Reply by rukuhia]]> 2018-06-19T17:32:23+12:00 2018-06-19T17:32:23+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=701&p=37231#p37231 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Brown Booby, Omaha Cove, Leigh :: Author edinatw]]> 2018-06-18T18:12:59+12:00 2018-06-18T18:12:59+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7806&p=37217#p37217

Attachments


Brown booby
EDZ_0013_6x4.jpg (1405.85 KiB)
Brown booby

]]>

Attachments


Brown booby
EDZ_0013_6x4.jpg (1405.85 KiB)
Brown booby

]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Brown Booby, Omaha Cove, Leigh :: Reply by Davidthomas]]> 2018-06-18T18:51:49+12:00 2018-06-18T18:51:49+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7806&p=37218#p37218 ]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Brown Booby, Omaha Cove, Leigh :: Reply by Tony Whitehead]]> 2018-06-18T21:31:19+12:00 2018-06-18T21:31:19+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7806&p=37221#p37221 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Brown Booby, Omaha Cove, Leigh :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-06-19T21:41:03+12:00 2018-06-19T21:41:03+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7806&p=37232#p37232 Submit an UBR.]]> Submit an UBR.]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Rooks in Hamilton East! :: Author Liam Ballard]]> 2018-06-20T08:24:05+12:00 2018-06-20T08:24:05+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7808&p=37233#p37233 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Rooks in Hamilton East! :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-06-20T18:12:45+12:00 2018-06-20T18:12:45+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7808&p=37243#p37243 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Record of 2 Pacific Gulls submitted, Punakaiki 25 Feb 2018 :: Reply by Patrick Crowe]]> 2018-06-21T07:45:23+12:00 2018-06-21T07:45:23+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7738&p=37249#p37249
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43162874

Looks like a black-back to me]]>

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43162874

Looks like a black-back to me]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Record of 2 Pacific Gulls submitted, Punakaiki 25 Feb 2018 :: Reply by Colin Miskelly]]> 2018-06-21T08:25:49+12:00 2018-06-21T08:25:49+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7738&p=37251#p37251
http://rare.birds.org.nz/

Regards
Colin]]>

http://rare.birds.org.nz/

Regards
Colin]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Record of 2 Pacific Gulls submitted, Punakaiki 25 Feb 2018 :: Reply by Nikki McArthur]]> 2018-06-21T08:32:41+12:00 2018-06-21T08:32:41+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7738&p=37252#p37252 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Record of 2 Pacific Gulls submitted, Punakaiki 25 Feb 2018 :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-06-21T08:37:04+12:00 2018-06-21T08:37:04+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7738&p=37253#p37253 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Little Egret, Foxton Estuary :: Reply by imogen]]> 2018-06-21T18:01:51+12:00 2018-06-21T18:01:51+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7779&p=37257#p37257
Little Egret 21062018-18.jpg

Little Egret 21062018-14.jpg

Little Egret 21062018-11.jpg

Attachments



Little Egret 21062018-18.jpg (193 KiB)



Little Egret 21062018-14.jpg (174.29 KiB)



Little Egret 21062018-11.jpg (151.25 KiB)


]]>

Little Egret 21062018-18.jpg

Little Egret 21062018-14.jpg

Little Egret 21062018-11.jpg

Attachments



Little Egret 21062018-18.jpg (193 KiB)



Little Egret 21062018-14.jpg (174.29 KiB)



Little Egret 21062018-11.jpg (151.25 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Leucistic Swamp Harrier :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-06-17T18:40:14+12:00 2018-06-17T18:40:14+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7801&p=37188#p37188 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Leucistic Swamp Harrier :: Reply by nzsam]]> 2018-06-19T08:30:30+12:00 2018-06-19T08:30:30+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7801&p=37222#p37222
Neil Fitzgerald wrote:That is one neat looking harrier. If my memory is correct, bilateral symmetry is a feature of leucism, so those dark primaries suggest you could reasonably call it leucistic.


Thank you for that confirmation Neil.]]>
Neil Fitzgerald wrote:That is one neat looking harrier. If my memory is correct, bilateral symmetry is a feature of leucism, so those dark primaries suggest you could reasonably call it leucistic.


Thank you for that confirmation Neil.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Leucistic Swamp Harrier :: Reply by nzsam]]> 2018-06-21T20:33:53+12:00 2018-06-21T20:33:53+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7801&p=37258#p37258 "Clearly not leucistic, but more likely to be a mutation called 'Brown'. See: https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... s_in_birds

I then posted the flight shot and he commented - "Those black primaries suggest to me that it is indeed "Brown". "Brown" is a mutation that causes a qualitative reduction of eumelanin: it breaks down in UV light. In other words, feathers get produced in their normal colour, but quickly fade to white as they bleach in sunlight. You can see that at least the right black primary is still being moulted, suggesting exactly this mutation. Interestingly, this mutation is sex-linked and only females can have it.

So I have learned something :-)]]>
"Clearly not leucistic, but more likely to be a mutation called 'Brown'. See: https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... s_in_birds

I then posted the flight shot and he commented - "Those black primaries suggest to me that it is indeed "Brown". "Brown" is a mutation that causes a qualitative reduction of eumelanin: it breaks down in UV light. In other words, feathers get produced in their normal colour, but quickly fade to white as they bleach in sunlight. You can see that at least the right black primary is still being moulted, suggesting exactly this mutation. Interestingly, this mutation is sex-linked and only females can have it.

So I have learned something :-)]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Leucistic Swamp Harrier :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-06-21T21:39:46+12:00 2018-06-21T21:39:46+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7801&p=37259#p37259
Now that I look properly, those primaries are not even symetrical. :shock: :roll:
Brown is common, and chances are it is a female, but it could be male. For that it would need to have a brown mother and a normal looking father that also carries the mutation. Not likely.

This thread might be of interest to those who haven't seen it:
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=247

In that (and I'll repost here) is a link to another of van Grouw's papers with a nice summary table of the common colour aberrations:
https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... s_in_birds]]>

Now that I look properly, those primaries are not even symetrical. :shock: :roll:
Brown is common, and chances are it is a female, but it could be male. For that it would need to have a brown mother and a normal looking father that also carries the mutation. Not likely.

This thread might be of interest to those who haven't seen it:
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=247

In that (and I'll repost here) is a link to another of van Grouw's papers with a nice summary table of the common colour aberrations:
https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... s_in_birds]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: If we didn't have photos no-one would believe us! :: Author andrewcrossland]]> 2018-06-17T20:09:05+12:00 2018-06-17T20:09:05+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7804&p=37192#p37192
Well today was the winter wader census at Lake Ellesmere and it started with patches of thick fog, 6 degree temperatures, an excessively high lake level, almost no exposed mudflats and only a 50/50 chance that anyone was gonna find anything. The Birds NZ teams set out to points around the northern and western side of the lake, while the CCC ranger teams headed to parts east and south. I left two teams of rangers at rendezvous rock opposite the Halswell rivermouth with a quick roadside lesson on rare bird ID 101 and a general wish of luck. It seemed to work as 10 minutes later they ran straight into a stunning breeding-plumaged Northern Shoveler.

Meanwhile, unbeknown to me (as I'd left my phone at the office and my radio wasn't working) I kept driving further and further away, heading half way down Kaitorete Spit, oblivious to that lifer slipping further and further away. But no worries, I drive into the CCC Kaitorete Reserve, jump up on the tray of the truck, set up and my scope, take a look and BINGO! a male Northern Shoveler! My good camera is broken but I managed to get some record shots with an older camera taken thru the scope. Green head, no crescent, large expansive clean white breast, bright chestnut flanks with no scalloping. THis site was 20km by road from the first bird and 5.4 km across the lake in a straight line.

Northern Shov2.jpg


I knew that Phil Crutchley was keen to see a Northern Shoveler but he had started his sector 16km west and was heading in my direction but was an unknown distance away. There were too many harriers about and by the time Phil arrived the Northern Shoveler had been flushed and was either among a flock of c.800 Shov/Grey Teal that had moved 100-200m offshore, or amongst another flock of at least 3000 Shov/Grey Teal feeding half-obscured in flooded grass and marsh. We spent half an hour searching but no luck - although (as occurred earlier in the season) there were many aberrant NZ Shoveler with pale breasts and "braces". All of these though had crescents and a varying amount of black splots on sides of breast and flanks. An example below"]]>

Well today was the winter wader census at Lake Ellesmere and it started with patches of thick fog, 6 degree temperatures, an excessively high lake level, almost no exposed mudflats and only a 50/50 chance that anyone was gonna find anything. The Birds NZ teams set out to points around the northern and western side of the lake, while the CCC ranger teams headed to parts east and south. I left two teams of rangers at rendezvous rock opposite the Halswell rivermouth with a quick roadside lesson on rare bird ID 101 and a general wish of luck. It seemed to work as 10 minutes later they ran straight into a stunning breeding-plumaged Northern Shoveler.

Meanwhile, unbeknown to me (as I'd left my phone at the office and my radio wasn't working) I kept driving further and further away, heading half way down Kaitorete Spit, oblivious to that lifer slipping further and further away. But no worries, I drive into the CCC Kaitorete Reserve, jump up on the tray of the truck, set up and my scope, take a look and BINGO! a male Northern Shoveler! My good camera is broken but I managed to get some record shots with an older camera taken thru the scope. Green head, no crescent, large expansive clean white breast, bright chestnut flanks with no scalloping. THis site was 20km by road from the first bird and 5.4 km across the lake in a straight line.

Northern Shov2.jpg


I knew that Phil Crutchley was keen to see a Northern Shoveler but he had started his sector 16km west and was heading in my direction but was an unknown distance away. There were too many harriers about and by the time Phil arrived the Northern Shoveler had been flushed and was either among a flock of c.800 Shov/Grey Teal that had moved 100-200m offshore, or amongst another flock of at least 3000 Shov/Grey Teal feeding half-obscured in flooded grass and marsh. We spent half an hour searching but no luck - although (as occurred earlier in the season) there were many aberrant NZ Shoveler with pale breasts and "braces". All of these though had crescents and a varying amount of black splots on sides of breast and flanks. An example below"]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: If we didn't have photos no-one would believe us! :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-06-17T20:10:28+12:00 2018-06-18T10:12:53+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7804&p=37193#p37193 Northern Shov2.jpg


N shoveler3.jpg


And an aberrant nz shov at the same location for comparison

NZ Shov.jpg

Attachments



Northern Shov2.jpg (247.93 KiB)



NZ Shov.jpg (234.65 KiB)



N shoveler3.jpg (264.42 KiB)


]]>
Northern Shov2.jpg


N shoveler3.jpg


And an aberrant nz shov at the same location for comparison

NZ Shov.jpg

Attachments



Northern Shov2.jpg (247.93 KiB)



NZ Shov.jpg (234.65 KiB)



N shoveler3.jpg (264.42 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: If we didn't have photos no-one would believe us! :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-06-17T20:33:41+12:00 2018-06-17T20:33:41+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7804&p=37195#p37195
map 1.jpg


map 2.JPG


We walk parallel to the stopbank (see map 2) and out toward a flock of 500+ Shov/Grey Teal on the lake edge, with another 300+ mostly Grey Teal to the north-west and hundreds more small ducks further south-east.

A Harrier keeps buzzing the birds and flushes the small waterfowl flocks away from the shoreline. The light is dark under a heavily overcast later afternoon sky. We can't find the Northern Shoveler, but turn up two small grebes at the end of the fenceline, exactly where the Shoveler was reported. Just beyond them was a pair of Crested Grebe.

Small grebes are a jinx bird on Lake Ellesmere - occasionally reported, always a great distance away under appalling light, and never satisfactorily identified to species. These two were <100m distant, but frequently diving and in grey light. I took photos thru the scope but of horrendously bad quality. They were greyish, dark-faced, dark-crowned, dark-backed, pale throated, pale rear-ended with no rufous and no yellow tear drop. We provisionally identified them as a pair of winter-plumaged Hoary-headed Grebe. Hopefully they'll be relocated tomorrow or later in the week.

small grebe 1.jpg

Attachments



map 1.jpg (114.34 KiB)



map 2.JPG (59.67 KiB)



small grebe 1.jpg (551.66 KiB)


]]>

map 1.jpg


map 2.JPG


We walk parallel to the stopbank (see map 2) and out toward a flock of 500+ Shov/Grey Teal on the lake edge, with another 300+ mostly Grey Teal to the north-west and hundreds more small ducks further south-east.

A Harrier keeps buzzing the birds and flushes the small waterfowl flocks away from the shoreline. The light is dark under a heavily overcast later afternoon sky. We can't find the Northern Shoveler, but turn up two small grebes at the end of the fenceline, exactly where the Shoveler was reported. Just beyond them was a pair of Crested Grebe.

Small grebes are a jinx bird on Lake Ellesmere - occasionally reported, always a great distance away under appalling light, and never satisfactorily identified to species. These two were <100m distant, but frequently diving and in grey light. I took photos thru the scope but of horrendously bad quality. They were greyish, dark-faced, dark-crowned, dark-backed, pale throated, pale rear-ended with no rufous and no yellow tear drop. We provisionally identified them as a pair of winter-plumaged Hoary-headed Grebe. Hopefully they'll be relocated tomorrow or later in the week.

small grebe 1.jpg

Attachments



map 1.jpg (114.34 KiB)



map 2.JPG (59.67 KiB)



small grebe 1.jpg (551.66 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: If we didn't have photos no-one would believe us! :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-06-17T20:48:38+12:00 2018-06-17T20:48:38+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7804&p=37197#p37197
cat.jpg


A short while after we spotted it, the cat swam to shore and skulked away like a leopard on a mission


cat 2.jpg


Moving away from the cat and the grebes we recommence our scanning for the Northern Shoveler. We look east and glass a large several hundred Shov/Grey Teal. Suddenly!! Phil spots it with binocs and grabs for his scope......

But, what the heck?! we suddenly realise there's a low flying (as in <30m) parapant is beating down on us - and the shoveler (never seen one of those at the lake before - esp on a mid-winter's day!). Nuts!

parapant.jpg


Terrified every bird for a mile around is about to take flight in panic, we seize quick views of the Northern Shoveler through the scopes and I take an absolutely terrible record shot (but, yeah, you know, its pretty obvious what the bird is!!).

Attachments



cat.jpg (112.39 KiB)



cat 2.jpg (282.57 KiB)



parapant.jpg (225.3 KiB)


]]>

cat.jpg


A short while after we spotted it, the cat swam to shore and skulked away like a leopard on a mission


cat 2.jpg


Moving away from the cat and the grebes we recommence our scanning for the Northern Shoveler. We look east and glass a large several hundred Shov/Grey Teal. Suddenly!! Phil spots it with binocs and grabs for his scope......

But, what the heck?! we suddenly realise there's a low flying (as in <30m) parapant is beating down on us - and the shoveler (never seen one of those at the lake before - esp on a mid-winter's day!). Nuts!

parapant.jpg


Terrified every bird for a mile around is about to take flight in panic, we seize quick views of the Northern Shoveler through the scopes and I take an absolutely terrible record shot (but, yeah, you know, its pretty obvious what the bird is!!).

Attachments



cat.jpg (112.39 KiB)



cat 2.jpg (282.57 KiB)



parapant.jpg (225.3 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: If we didn't have photos no-one would believe us! :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-06-17T20:51:44+12:00 2018-06-17T21:10:19+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7804&p=37198#p37198
N shoveler1.jpg



And just to finish off,...... here's a nice photo of some rabbits!!



rabbits.jpg

Attachments



N shoveler1.jpg (333.14 KiB)



rabbits.jpg (514.37 KiB)


]]>

N shoveler1.jpg



And just to finish off,...... here's a nice photo of some rabbits!!



rabbits.jpg

Attachments



N shoveler1.jpg (333.14 KiB)



rabbits.jpg (514.37 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: If we didn't have photos no-one would believe us! :: Reply by Davidthomas]]> 2018-06-17T21:05:22+12:00 2018-06-17T21:05:22+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7804&p=37200#p37200 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: If we didn't have photos no-one would believe us! :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-06-17T21:54:43+12:00 2018-06-17T21:54:43+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7804&p=37201#p37201 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: If we didn't have photos no-one would believe us! :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-06-17T21:55:34+12:00 2018-06-17T21:55:34+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7804&p=37202#p37202 Good to see the Canterbury panther is alive and well.]]> Good to see the Canterbury panther is alive and well.]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: If we didn't have photos no-one would believe us! :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-06-18T08:02:53+12:00 2018-06-18T08:02:53+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7804&p=37203#p37203 Maybe NZs legendary "otter" has been found.....!]]> Maybe NZs legendary "otter" has been found.....!]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: If we didn't have photos no-one would believe us! :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-06-18T09:50:58+12:00 2018-06-18T09:50:58+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7804&p=37208#p37208 20180618_094720.jpg

20180618_094711.jpg

Attachments



20180618_094720.jpg (646.8 KiB)



20180618_094711.jpg (693 KiB)


]]>
20180618_094720.jpg

20180618_094711.jpg

Attachments



20180618_094720.jpg (646.8 KiB)



20180618_094711.jpg (693 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: If we didn't have photos no-one would believe us! :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-06-18T09:56:46+12:00 2018-06-18T09:56:46+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7804&p=37209#p37209 20180618_094700.jpg

20180618_094650.jpg

Attachments



20180618_094700.jpg (790.93 KiB)



20180618_094650.jpg (802.59 KiB)


]]>
20180618_094700.jpg

20180618_094650.jpg

Attachments



20180618_094700.jpg (790.93 KiB)



20180618_094650.jpg (802.59 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: If we didn't have photos no-one would believe us! :: Reply by kelly111]]> 2018-06-18T21:06:35+12:00 2018-06-18T21:06:35+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7804&p=37220#p37220
andrewcrossland wrote:So, we decide to leave this bird and go back to where Matt Rose, Kenny Rose and the other guys in the CCC teams had found the first Northern Shoveler. Directions were straight out at the fenceline just west of the Royal Spoonbill colony.

map 1.jpg

map 2.JPG

We walk parallel to the stopbank (see map 2) and out toward a flock of 500+ Shov/Grey Teal on the lake edge, with another 300+ mostly Grey Teal to the north-west and hundreds more small ducks further south-east.

A Harrier keeps buzzing the birds and flushes the small waterfowl flocks away from the shoreline. The light is dark under a heavily overcast later afternoon sky. We can't find the Northern Shoveler, but turn up two small grebes at the end of the fenceline, exactly where the Shoveler was reported. Just beyond them was a pair of Crested Grebe.

Small grebes are a jinx bird on Lake Ellesmere - occasionally reported, always a great distance away under appalling light, and never satisfactorily identified to species. These two were <100m distant, but frequently diving and in grey light. I took photos thru the scope but of horrendously bad quality. They were greyish, dark-faced, dark-crowned, dark-backed, pale throated, pale rear-ended with no rufous and no yellow tear drop. We provisionally identified them as a pair of winter-plumaged Hoary-headed Grebe. Hopefully they'll be relocated tomorrow or later in the week.

small grebe 1.jpg
me and my son.are going out this weekend to look for it hope to see it.]]>
andrewcrossland wrote:So, we decide to leave this bird and go back to where Matt Rose, Kenny Rose and the other guys in the CCC teams had found the first Northern Shoveler. Directions were straight out at the fenceline just west of the Royal Spoonbill colony.

map 1.jpg

map 2.JPG

We walk parallel to the stopbank (see map 2) and out toward a flock of 500+ Shov/Grey Teal on the lake edge, with another 300+ mostly Grey Teal to the north-west and hundreds more small ducks further south-east.

A Harrier keeps buzzing the birds and flushes the small waterfowl flocks away from the shoreline. The light is dark under a heavily overcast later afternoon sky. We can't find the Northern Shoveler, but turn up two small grebes at the end of the fenceline, exactly where the Shoveler was reported. Just beyond them was a pair of Crested Grebe.

Small grebes are a jinx bird on Lake Ellesmere - occasionally reported, always a great distance away under appalling light, and never satisfactorily identified to species. These two were <100m distant, but frequently diving and in grey light. I took photos thru the scope but of horrendously bad quality. They were greyish, dark-faced, dark-crowned, dark-backed, pale throated, pale rear-ended with no rufous and no yellow tear drop. We provisionally identified them as a pair of winter-plumaged Hoary-headed Grebe. Hopefully they'll be relocated tomorrow or later in the week.

small grebe 1.jpg
me and my son.are going out this weekend to look for it hope to see it.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: If we didn't have photos no-one would believe us! :: Reply by Bev Alexander]]> 2018-06-20T09:52:37+12:00 2018-06-20T09:52:37+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7804&p=37237#p37237
Happy birding all.]]>

Happy birding all.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: If we didn't have photos no-one would believe us! :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-06-20T16:27:20+12:00 2018-06-20T16:27:20+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7804&p=37241#p37241 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: If we didn't have photos no-one would believe us! :: Reply by GrahameNZ]]> 2018-06-20T20:29:39+12:00 2018-06-20T20:29:39+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7804&p=37248#p37248 ]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: If we didn't have photos no-one would believe us! :: Reply by David Melville]]> 2018-06-21T13:00:47+12:00 2018-06-21T13:00:47+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7804&p=37254#p37254
Northern Shoveler is monotypic – there are no recognised sub-species/races.

It breeds across most of the Palearctic and Nearctic except the high arctic – mostly between 40-60 degrees N, and most winter between 20-40 degrees North.

It is a regular non-breeding season visitor to Hawaii. http://hbs.bishopmuseum.org/birds/rlp-m ... e/NSHO.pdf

However a review noted the need for research to increase ‘understanding of movements of individuals that overfly the Hawaiian Islands’. I have been unable to track down any banding recoveries of birds from the Pacific.

Non-breeding birds regularly occur as far south as the Caribbean and Central America.

There is one record from Peru (11 degrees South) https://boletinunop.weebly.com/uploads/ ... p_vol._7_n°2_2012_-_crap.pdf
and one record from Argentina at 48 degrees South: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B2uWlR ... pVSzQ/view
[Lake Ellesmere is 43 degrees South]. It was considered possible that the latter bird might be an escape as there is a captive population in Chile, it was concluded that it was probably a wild individual.

If any hunter bags one in New Zealand it would be very good to get the specimen to a museum and to consider the possibility of looking at stable isotopes to try to determine its geographic origin.

David]]>

Northern Shoveler is monotypic – there are no recognised sub-species/races.

It breeds across most of the Palearctic and Nearctic except the high arctic – mostly between 40-60 degrees N, and most winter between 20-40 degrees North.

It is a regular non-breeding season visitor to Hawaii. http://hbs.bishopmuseum.org/birds/rlp-m ... e/NSHO.pdf

However a review noted the need for research to increase ‘understanding of movements of individuals that overfly the Hawaiian Islands’. I have been unable to track down any banding recoveries of birds from the Pacific.

Non-breeding birds regularly occur as far south as the Caribbean and Central America.

There is one record from Peru (11 degrees South) https://boletinunop.weebly.com/uploads/ ... p_vol._7_n°2_2012_-_crap.pdf
and one record from Argentina at 48 degrees South: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B2uWlR ... pVSzQ/view
[Lake Ellesmere is 43 degrees South]. It was considered possible that the latter bird might be an escape as there is a captive population in Chile, it was concluded that it was probably a wild individual.

If any hunter bags one in New Zealand it would be very good to get the specimen to a museum and to consider the possibility of looking at stable isotopes to try to determine its geographic origin.

David]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: If we didn't have photos no-one would believe us! :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-06-21T17:18:53+12:00 2018-06-21T17:18:53+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7804&p=37256#p37256 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: If we didn't have photos no-one would believe us! :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-06-22T06:49:20+12:00 2018-06-22T06:49:20+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7804&p=37260#p37260
Russ C
Morrinsville, Nz]]>

Russ C
Morrinsville, Nz]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Can someone help me with identification of a feather :: Author ben]]> 2018-06-19T08:52:02+12:00 2018-06-20T09:14:49+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7807&p=37223#p37223 Can anyone recognise it please.
Cheers

Attachments



35516106_10156614274499459_4662097582883864576_n.jpg (216.92 KiB)



Untitled.jpg (724.03 KiB)


]]>
Can anyone recognise it please.
Cheers

Attachments



35516106_10156614274499459_4662097582883864576_n.jpg (216.92 KiB)



Untitled.jpg (724.03 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Can someone help me with identification of a feather :: Reply by Davidthomas]]> 2018-06-19T09:16:46+12:00 2018-06-19T09:16:46+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7807&p=37224#p37224 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Can someone help me with identification of a feather :: Reply by zarkov]]> 2018-06-19T09:46:23+12:00 2018-06-19T09:46:23+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7807&p=37225#p37225 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Can someone help me with identification of a feather :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-06-19T15:12:39+12:00 2018-06-19T15:12:39+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7807&p=37227#p37227 Is it near where Hunt for the Wilderpeople was filmed....?]]> Is it near where Hunt for the Wilderpeople was filmed....?]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Can someone help me with identification of a feather :: Reply by bruce.shanks]]> 2018-06-19T16:32:24+12:00 2018-06-19T16:32:24+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7807&p=37229#p37229 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Can someone help me with identification of a feather :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-06-19T16:50:43+12:00 2018-06-19T16:50:43+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7807&p=37230#p37230 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Can someone help me with identification of a feather :: Reply by ben]]> 2018-06-20T09:15:35+12:00 2018-06-20T09:15:35+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7807&p=37234#p37234 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Can someone help me with identification of a feather :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-06-20T16:17:23+12:00 2018-06-20T16:17:23+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7807&p=37240#p37240 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Can someone help me with identification of a feather :: Reply by David Riddell]]> 2018-06-21T08:18:10+12:00 2018-06-21T08:18:10+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7807&p=37250#p37250 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Can someone help me with identification of a feather :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-06-21T15:29:31+12:00 2018-06-21T15:29:31+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7807&p=37255#p37255
20180621_132010.jpg

Attachments



20180621_132010.jpg (358.88 KiB)


]]>

20180621_132010.jpg

Attachments



20180621_132010.jpg (358.88 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Can someone help me with identification of a feather :: Reply by ben]]> 2018-06-22T09:54:09+12:00 2018-06-22T09:54:09+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7807&p=37262#p37262 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Northern Shoveler Porangahau Estuary :: Author Joanna10]]> 2018-06-24T18:34:45+12:00 2018-06-24T18:34:45+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7812&p=37276#p37276 With a group of 4 Australian Shoveler (1 Male, 3 female). Clear sighting of his green head and full white breast.
Recorded by Colin Shore and Joanna McVeagh]]>
With a group of 4 Australian Shoveler (1 Male, 3 female). Clear sighting of his green head and full white breast.
Recorded by Colin Shore and Joanna McVeagh]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern Shoveler Porangahau Estuary :: Reply by Nikki McArthur]]> 2018-06-24T18:38:08+12:00 2018-06-24T18:38:08+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7812&p=37277#p37277
...Don't forget to submit an UBR!]]>

...Don't forget to submit an UBR!]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern Shoveler Porangahau Estuary :: Reply by Joanna10]]> 2018-06-24T18:40:26+12:00 2018-06-24T18:40:26+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7812&p=37278#p37278 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Leucistic Pied Stilt Porangahau Estuary :: Author Joanna10]]> 2018-06-24T19:48:41+12:00 2018-06-24T19:48:41+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7813&p=37279#p37279 Only 3 small dark smudges on the bird's left wing observed.
No camera with us unfortunately which was a shame as it was quite a stunning looking bird.]]>
Only 3 small dark smudges on the bird's left wing observed.
No camera with us unfortunately which was a shame as it was quite a stunning looking bird.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Galah :: Reply by ourspot]]> 2018-06-25T07:23:06+12:00 2018-06-25T07:23:06+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6857&p=37284#p37284
Also got to see the Northern Shoveler at Miranda on Saturday.

Cheers Scott

Attachments



Galah_Mangatawhiri_Jun18_LR_IMG_9562.jpg (539.74 KiB)



Galah_Mangatawhiri_Jun18_LR_IMG_9587.jpg (755.42 KiB)



Galah_Mangatawhiri_Jun18_LR_IMG_9579.jpg (646.74 KiB)


]]>

Also got to see the Northern Shoveler at Miranda on Saturday.

Cheers Scott

Attachments



Galah_Mangatawhiri_Jun18_LR_IMG_9562.jpg (539.74 KiB)



Galah_Mangatawhiri_Jun18_LR_IMG_9587.jpg (755.42 KiB)



Galah_Mangatawhiri_Jun18_LR_IMG_9579.jpg (646.74 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Galah :: Reply by BombayDave]]> 2018-06-26T17:30:17+12:00 2018-06-26T17:30:17+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6857&p=37296#p37296 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Updates on the Lake Ellesmere Northern Shovs & HH Grebes :: Author andrewcrossland]]> 2018-06-24T22:10:19+12:00 2018-06-24T22:10:19+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7814&p=37280#p37280
The more accessible bird near the Spoonbill colony (a 500m walk from the Akaroa highway) was found last Saturday by Matt Rose, and watched at the time by Kenny Rose, Alice Waterhouse, Kristina MacDonald, Dale McIntee, Mike Hargraves. Later that same afternoon, Phil Crutchley and I saw it and also found a pair of small grebes (which we ID'd as Hoary-headed) at the end of the fenceline that goes straight out in to the lake.

Mid week, Bev Alexander and other Birds NZ folk saw the shoveler at the same location, and today Grahame Bell and Matthias also saw (and photographed it) there. None of these folks saw the grebes though (although an adult and 3 juv Crested Grebes were present).

The 2nd Northern Shov was found and photographed by me last Sat the CCC Reserve, but after a period of observation was flushed by a Harrier and resettled amongst thousands of Grey Teal and NZ Shoveler that were in that area. I had another look there today but the lake has risen considerably since last Sunday and flooded a wide area of grassland/marsh. I couldn't relocate the bird, but as its also in stunning breeding plumage, we should see it again somewhere around the lake.

There is perhaps 3 - 5 weeks left for Northern Shoveler searching before the big winter flocks of NZ Shoveler break up and birds return to breeding grounds in pairs and small groups for breeding. So, good luck out there!

With regards the HH Grebes - much appreciated if anyone gets some decent photos! Mine were pretty crappy!!]]>

The more accessible bird near the Spoonbill colony (a 500m walk from the Akaroa highway) was found last Saturday by Matt Rose, and watched at the time by Kenny Rose, Alice Waterhouse, Kristina MacDonald, Dale McIntee, Mike Hargraves. Later that same afternoon, Phil Crutchley and I saw it and also found a pair of small grebes (which we ID'd as Hoary-headed) at the end of the fenceline that goes straight out in to the lake.

Mid week, Bev Alexander and other Birds NZ folk saw the shoveler at the same location, and today Grahame Bell and Matthias also saw (and photographed it) there. None of these folks saw the grebes though (although an adult and 3 juv Crested Grebes were present).

The 2nd Northern Shov was found and photographed by me last Sat the CCC Reserve, but after a period of observation was flushed by a Harrier and resettled amongst thousands of Grey Teal and NZ Shoveler that were in that area. I had another look there today but the lake has risen considerably since last Sunday and flooded a wide area of grassland/marsh. I couldn't relocate the bird, but as its also in stunning breeding plumage, we should see it again somewhere around the lake.

There is perhaps 3 - 5 weeks left for Northern Shoveler searching before the big winter flocks of NZ Shoveler break up and birds return to breeding grounds in pairs and small groups for breeding. So, good luck out there!

With regards the HH Grebes - much appreciated if anyone gets some decent photos! Mine were pretty crappy!!]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Updates on the Lake Ellesmere Northern Shovs & HH Grebes :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-06-24T23:13:27+12:00 2018-06-24T23:13:27+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7814&p=37281#p37281 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Updates on the Lake Ellesmere Northern Shovs & HH Grebes :: Reply by Nick Allen]]> 2018-06-27T13:27:51+12:00 2018-06-27T13:27:51+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7814&p=37307#p37307 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Updates on the Lake Ellesmere Northern Shovs & HH Grebes :: Reply by Davidthomas]]> 2018-06-27T13:54:22+12:00 2018-06-27T13:54:22+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7814&p=37308#p37308
Also of note were two non breeding plumage red necked stints amongst the banded dotterels at the spit tip, along with some caspian terns, bft and wft.

We also had atleast 5 northern giant petrels scooting in and out of the breakers at birdlings flat, with atleast 10 Westland/white chinned petrels also flying past in fifteen minutes of sea I watching, and a bullers albatross.]]>

Also of note were two non breeding plumage red necked stints amongst the banded dotterels at the spit tip, along with some caspian terns, bft and wft.

We also had atleast 5 northern giant petrels scooting in and out of the breakers at birdlings flat, with atleast 10 Westland/white chinned petrels also flying past in fifteen minutes of sea I watching, and a bullers albatross.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Australasian Grebe in Lake Killarney Takaka :: Author kengeorge]]> 2018-06-28T16:30:38+12:00 2018-06-28T16:30:38+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7825&p=37320#p37320

Attachments



No_01a.jpg (485.05 KiB)



No_02a.jpg (424.73 KiB)


]]>

Attachments



No_01a.jpg (485.05 KiB)



No_02a.jpg (424.73 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Porangahau Estuary Wader Count June 2018 :: Author Joanna10]]> 2018-06-27T22:22:55+12:00 2018-06-27T22:22:55+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7822&p=37316#p37316 Attached are the results of the winter wader survey for the Porangahau Estuary, conducted June 24th. This was a joint exercise between Hawkes Bay and Wairarapa Branches of Birds New Zealand.
Highlights were the Northern shoveler (of course!), good numbers of wrybill and NZ dotterels and the interest-factor had to be the leucistic Pied stilt.
It was a great day and much enjoyed by the Wairarapa contingent who had not visited the estuary before.
regards
Joanna

Attachments


Porangahau Wader Survey.pdf (30.47 KiB)
]]>
Attached are the results of the winter wader survey for the Porangahau Estuary, conducted June 24th. This was a joint exercise between Hawkes Bay and Wairarapa Branches of Birds New Zealand.
Highlights were the Northern shoveler (of course!), good numbers of wrybill and NZ dotterels and the interest-factor had to be the leucistic Pied stilt.
It was a great day and much enjoyed by the Wairarapa contingent who had not visited the estuary before.
regards
Joanna

Attachments


Porangahau Wader Survey.pdf (30.47 KiB)
]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Porangahau Estuary Wader Count June 2018 :: Reply by Paul Shortis]]> 2018-06-29T09:03:48+12:00 2018-06-29T09:03:48+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7822&p=37322#p37322 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Glossy ibis :: Reply by Will Parsons]]> 2018-06-29T19:27:41+12:00 2018-06-29T19:27:41+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4072&p=37333#p37333 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Glossy ibis :: Reply by Davidthomas]]> 2018-06-29T20:38:50+12:00 2018-06-29T20:38:50+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4072&p=37336#p37336
But was treated to a flock of atleast 5 Cirl buntings, and 8 Black fronted dotterels in the salt/sand pans to the south of the car park.]]>

But was treated to a flock of atleast 5 Cirl buntings, and 8 Black fronted dotterels in the salt/sand pans to the south of the car park.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Glossy ibis :: Reply by Will Parsons]]> 2018-06-29T22:07:55+12:00 2018-06-29T22:07:55+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4072&p=37338#p37338 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Dabchick, Lake Rotoroa/Hamilton Lake :: Reply by Will Parsons]]> 2018-06-29T19:35:23+12:00 2018-06-29T19:35:23+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7797&p=37334#p37334 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Dabchick, Lake Rotoroa/Hamilton Lake :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-06-30T19:59:09+12:00 2018-06-30T19:59:09+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7797&p=37345#p37345
Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>

Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by Ian Southey]]> 2018-06-17T09:55:22+12:00 2018-06-17T09:55:22+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=37180#p37180
Ian]]>

Ian]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-06-17T18:26:24+12:00 2018-06-17T18:26:24+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=37187#p37187 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by Ian Southey]]> 2018-06-18T09:39:10+12:00 2018-06-18T09:39:10+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=37205#p37205
Ian]]>

Ian]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-06-18T09:44:48+12:00 2018-06-18T09:44:48+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=37206#p37206 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by Ian Southey]]> 2018-06-18T09:48:23+12:00 2018-06-18T09:48:23+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=37207#p37207
Ian]]>

Ian]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-06-18T10:09:10+12:00 2018-06-18T10:09:10+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=37210#p37210
20180618_094700.jpg


20180618_100509.jpg

Attachments



20180618_094700.jpg (790.93 KiB)



20180618_100509.jpg (419.24 KiB)


]]>

20180618_094700.jpg


20180618_100509.jpg

Attachments



20180618_094700.jpg (790.93 KiB)



20180618_100509.jpg (419.24 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by Amber Calman]]> 2018-06-18T14:41:55+12:00 2018-06-18T14:41:55+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=37215#p37215
IMG_5700.jpg

Image

There was a couple of other white-ish chested birds that do stand-out but he stands out a lot more.
IMG_5753.jpg
IMG_5735.jpg


I also scanned for females but they would be very hard to see, I've got lots of photos to check though.

Attachments



IMG_5700.jpg (309.99 KiB)



IMG_5735.jpg (195.95 KiB)



IMG_5753.jpg (349.72 KiB)


]]>
IMG_5700.jpg

Image

There was a couple of other white-ish chested birds that do stand-out but he stands out a lot more.
IMG_5753.jpg
IMG_5735.jpg


I also scanned for females but they would be very hard to see, I've got lots of photos to check though.

Attachments



IMG_5700.jpg (309.99 KiB)



IMG_5735.jpg (195.95 KiB)



IMG_5753.jpg (349.72 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by sav]]> 2018-06-18T20:56:15+12:00 2018-06-18T20:56:15+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=37219#p37219
Brilliant stuff. A couple of questions and observations from me. I'm travelling without any of my reference material:

Is there anything in the plumage to separate North American from European/Asian Northern Shovelers? With the small number that are ever seen in Aus, I wonder if ours might have come from the "other" direction?

Females? Of course they are much harder (though not impossible) to pin down, but for pretty much any species prone to vagrancy it is (normally young) males that are the most likely. So there may well be females here as well, but not necessarily so.

I'm in Britain at the moment, and just for the record all the Northern Shovelers that I have seen in the past couple of weeks (and there are lots here!) are well past the pristine plumage of any of these drakes - so I think Ian's comment above about Northern/Southern hemisphere moult cycles is probably redundant.

For those of British origin this might be interesting: I went to RSPB Burton Mere on the Wirral, where 400 (four hundred!) Little Egrets roost!! Best bird there for me was flowering Bee Orchids!

cheers]]>

Brilliant stuff. A couple of questions and observations from me. I'm travelling without any of my reference material:

Is there anything in the plumage to separate North American from European/Asian Northern Shovelers? With the small number that are ever seen in Aus, I wonder if ours might have come from the "other" direction?

Females? Of course they are much harder (though not impossible) to pin down, but for pretty much any species prone to vagrancy it is (normally young) males that are the most likely. So there may well be females here as well, but not necessarily so.

I'm in Britain at the moment, and just for the record all the Northern Shovelers that I have seen in the past couple of weeks (and there are lots here!) are well past the pristine plumage of any of these drakes - so I think Ian's comment above about Northern/Southern hemisphere moult cycles is probably redundant.

For those of British origin this might be interesting: I went to RSPB Burton Mere on the Wirral, where 400 (four hundred!) Little Egrets roost!! Best bird there for me was flowering Bee Orchids!

cheers]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by Steve Wood]]> 2018-06-23T17:36:18+12:00 2018-06-23T17:36:18+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=37273#p37273 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by Rebecca Bowater]]> 2018-06-30T20:58:23+12:00 2018-06-30T20:58:23+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=37346#p37346 Rebecca Bowater Sat 30th June 2018]]> Rebecca Bowater Sat 30th June 2018]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Black Stilt at Ambury Park :: Author Ian McLean]]> 2018-07-01T21:17:49+12:00 2018-07-01T21:17:49+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7828&p=37350#p37350 During our Birds New Zealand, Guided Bird Walk at Ambury Park in Mangere today, a Black Stilt (Kaki) was seen at the Radio Mast roost site in the company of Pied Stilts, Bar Tailed Godwits & Wrybills. The bird looks to be a pure bird, it is unbanded & may possibly be the result of a pair breeding outside of the MacKenzie country stronghold of the species ? The bird had some white feathers on the vent area (when seen in flight) & looks to be a juvenile bird that is almost in adult plumage. Thanks to Denise Poyner for the photograph.
Regards
Ian

Attachments



Black Stilt (Kaki) Pied Stilt Godwit Wrybill.JPG (343.22 KiB)


]]>
During our Birds New Zealand, Guided Bird Walk at Ambury Park in Mangere today, a Black Stilt (Kaki) was seen at the Radio Mast roost site in the company of Pied Stilts, Bar Tailed Godwits & Wrybills. The bird looks to be a pure bird, it is unbanded & may possibly be the result of a pair breeding outside of the MacKenzie country stronghold of the species ? The bird had some white feathers on the vent area (when seen in flight) & looks to be a juvenile bird that is almost in adult plumage. Thanks to Denise Poyner for the photograph.
Regards
Ian

Attachments



Black Stilt (Kaki) Pied Stilt Godwit Wrybill.JPG (343.22 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Thoughts please Is this a hybrid? Otago Harbour :: Author Wandoona]]> 2018-06-26T18:50:14+12:00 2018-06-26T18:50:14+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7821&p=37299#p37299 http://www.deervelvet.co.nz/wp-content/ ... 2006:49:06]]> http://www.deervelvet.co.nz/wp-content/ ... 2006:49:06]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Thoughts please Is this a hybrid? Otago Harbour :: Reply by Jim Kirker]]> 2018-06-26T19:11:19+12:00 2018-06-26T19:11:19+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7821&p=37300#p37300 viewtopic.php?f=3&t=6415&p=31752&hilit=kirker+waiatarua#p31752]]> viewtopic.php?f=3&t=6415&p=31752&hilit=kirker+waiatarua#p31752]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Thoughts please Is this a hybrid? Otago Harbour :: Reply by David Riddell]]> 2018-06-27T08:47:43+12:00 2018-06-27T08:47:43+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7821&p=37303#p37303 https://www.roysfarm.com/duclair-duck/]]> https://www.roysfarm.com/duclair-duck/]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Thoughts please Is this a hybrid? Otago Harbour :: Reply by David Melville]]> 2018-06-27T09:47:21+12:00 2018-06-27T09:47:21+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7821&p=37304#p37304 http://nzbirdsonline.org.nz/species/mallard

The origin of the 'Cayuga Duck' is also murky with some suggesting that it is a variant of the American Black Duck: https://livestockconservancy.org/images ... EVISED.pdf

I had not previously heard of a Duclair duck - but it appears that this descriptive of a colour form rather than a 'species' as it has also been used to describe a form of Muscovy Duck: http://www.ringneckdove.com/Homology%20 ... utants.pdf

And finally, not related to the Norwegian Blue (a form of parrot - for younger readers) , comes the Swedish Blue - http://domestic-waterfowl.co.uk/swedish.html

Take your pick!

David]]>
http://nzbirdsonline.org.nz/species/mallard

The origin of the 'Cayuga Duck' is also murky with some suggesting that it is a variant of the American Black Duck: https://livestockconservancy.org/images ... EVISED.pdf

I had not previously heard of a Duclair duck - but it appears that this descriptive of a colour form rather than a 'species' as it has also been used to describe a form of Muscovy Duck: http://www.ringneckdove.com/Homology%20 ... utants.pdf

And finally, not related to the Norwegian Blue (a form of parrot - for younger readers) , comes the Swedish Blue - http://domestic-waterfowl.co.uk/swedish.html

Take your pick!

David]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Thoughts please Is this a hybrid? Otago Harbour :: Reply by Wandoona]]> 2018-06-28T07:34:28+12:00 2018-06-28T07:34:28+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7821&p=37317#p37317 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Thoughts please Is this a hybrid? Otago Harbour :: Reply by Raewyn]]> 2018-07-01T21:40:02+12:00 2018-07-01T21:40:02+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7821&p=37351#p37351 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: White heron and little egret at Manawatu Estuary. :: Author imogen]]> 2018-06-30T08:16:28+12:00 2018-06-30T08:16:28+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7827&p=37340#p37340
Little Egret 29062018-33.jpg
White Heron 29062018-14.jpg
Little Egret 29062018-17.jpg

Attachments



Little Egret 29062018-33.jpg (177.85 KiB)



White Heron 29062018-14.jpg (180.62 KiB)



Little Egret 29062018-17.jpg (252.69 KiB)


]]>

Little Egret 29062018-33.jpg
White Heron 29062018-14.jpg
Little Egret 29062018-17.jpg

Attachments



Little Egret 29062018-33.jpg (177.85 KiB)



White Heron 29062018-14.jpg (180.62 KiB)



Little Egret 29062018-17.jpg (252.69 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: White heron and little egret at Manawatu Estuary. :: Reply by Olwen]]> 2018-07-03T21:18:54+12:00 2018-07-03T21:18:54+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7827&p=37356#p37356 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by pfe92nz]]> 2018-06-22T12:05:43+12:00 2018-06-22T12:05:43+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=37264#p37264 New Brighton Road and corner of Brooker Ave, so about 1500m away from where it was before.]]> New Brighton Road and corner of Brooker Ave, so about 1500m away from where it was before.]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by Wanderinnthlander]]> 2018-06-25T17:58:01+12:00 2018-06-25T17:58:01+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=37289#p37289 ) but it seemed to be happy under the pages/NB rd bridge. Often there's lots of swallows nesting on the nth side but not tonight.]]> ) but it seemed to be happy under the pages/NB rd bridge. Often there's lots of swallows nesting on the nth side but not tonight.]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by pfe92nz]]> 2018-07-04T09:08:15+12:00 2018-07-04T09:08:15+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=37357#p37357
The local New Brighton facebook page has a few reports of it now, one unconfirmed report from Dallington area about two or three weeks ago (not too far from my possible sighting on 22/6) and a positive ID on Oram Avenue on Saturday.

When I saw it this morning it was on the road then flew off to the east along Collingwood Street.]]>

The local New Brighton facebook page has a few reports of it now, one unconfirmed report from Dallington area about two or three weeks ago (not too far from my possible sighting on 22/6) and a positive ID on Oram Avenue on Saturday.

When I saw it this morning it was on the road then flew off to the east along Collingwood Street.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern Shoveler at Miranda :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-06-17T10:50:07+12:00 2018-06-17T10:50:07+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6987&p=37181#p37181 Grahame]]> Grahame]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern Shoveler at Miranda :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-06-17T11:21:38+12:00 2018-06-17T11:21:38+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6987&p=37183#p37183 Grahame]]> Grahame]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern Shoveler at Miranda :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-06-17T20:34:43+12:00 2018-06-17T20:34:43+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6987&p=37196#p37196 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern Shoveler at Miranda :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-06-18T09:02:45+12:00 2018-06-18T13:01:34+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6987&p=37204#p37204 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern Shoveler at Miranda :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-06-18T10:29:41+12:00 2018-06-18T10:29:41+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6987&p=37211#p37211 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern Shoveler at Miranda :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-06-18T13:59:46+12:00 2018-06-18T13:59:46+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6987&p=37213#p37213 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern Shoveler at Miranda :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-06-23T17:30:03+12:00 2018-06-27T20:31:43+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6987&p=37272#p37272
Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>

Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern Shoveler at Miranda :: Reply by Logan]]> 2018-06-27T19:12:03+12:00 2018-06-27T19:12:03+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6987&p=37313#p37313 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern Shoveler at Miranda :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-06-29T12:29:05+12:00 2018-06-29T12:29:05+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6987&p=37323#p37323 Cheers, Grahame]]> Cheers, Grahame]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern Shoveler at Miranda :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-06-29T18:18:45+12:00 2018-06-29T18:18:45+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6987&p=37331#p37331
Do you know if anyone has seen a second bird since you first reported it? I wonder if it was just passing through? Scott and I had pretty good looks through the flock on Sunday evening but only had one.

Counted close to 70 shoveler in Te Aroha this afternoon but no Northerns--gutted!

Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>

Do you know if anyone has seen a second bird since you first reported it? I wonder if it was just passing through? Scott and I had pretty good looks through the flock on Sunday evening but only had one.

Counted close to 70 shoveler in Te Aroha this afternoon but no Northerns--gutted!

Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern Shoveler at Miranda :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-06-29T18:32:30+12:00 2018-06-29T18:32:30+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6987&p=37332#p37332
I have not heard of anyone seeing the two since that day. The two were showed to another couple of birders on the day they were found, so its possible that inly four people saw them.
Cheers,

Grahame]]>

I have not heard of anyone seeing the two since that day. The two were showed to another couple of birders on the day they were found, so its possible that inly four people saw them.
Cheers,

Grahame]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern Shoveler at Miranda :: Reply by Liam Ballard]]> 2018-07-01T10:14:05+12:00 2018-07-01T10:14:05+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6987&p=37347#p37347 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern Shoveler at Miranda :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-07-04T14:09:35+12:00 2018-07-04T14:09:35+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6987&p=37358#p37358 Cheers
Grahame]]>
Cheers
Grahame]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Melanistic Sacred Kingfisher? Whakatane :: Author Michael Szabo]]> 2018-07-08T16:29:46+12:00 2018-07-08T16:29:46+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7836&p=37372#p37372
Is this a melanistic Sacred Kingfisher?

Link to photo: https://scontent.fpmr1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/ ... e=5BA87A06]]>

Is this a melanistic Sacred Kingfisher?

Link to photo: https://scontent.fpmr1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/ ... e=5BA87A06]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Melanistic Sacred Kingfisher? Whakatane :: Reply by john b]]> 2018-07-08T20:00:37+12:00 2018-07-08T20:00:37+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7836&p=37373#p37373 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: West Waikato Seawatch - July 11 :: Author RussCannings]]> 2018-07-11T18:59:28+12:00 2018-07-11T18:59:28+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7840&p=37389#p37389
Today started off quite poorly just after arriving at Ruapuke Beach pre-dawn. As I confidently strode across a stream in my gumboots, I soon discovered that this stream was far too deep... 'jandals for the rest of the day it is then... Perhaps this was a sign, as the only bird I saw over the ocean from the main Ruapuke Beach access was 1 Black-backed Gull! I also learned a valuable lesson: You can't patrol a beach for wrecks when there is no beach (high tide/rough swell.... duh). Things perked up when I popped into the Swann Rd Access at the north end of the beach. There was still no beach but in quick succession I scoped a White-capped Albatross, Buller's Albatross, and a gannet. Off to Ruapuke Rock!

I spent about an hour and half above Ruapuke Rock (sure to be a ways away from rogue wave range). Visibility was generally quite good with only a few spits. Unfortunately there were no bait balls (fish work-ups attracting flocks of birds) like my last visit so while there were plenty of Fluttering Shearwaters around, they were quite dispersed and far out. A few gannets fished close to shore but most were at least 3 km offshore. Surprisingly, I only saw a handful of White-capped Albatrosses in my hour+ stint with the only other (non-Flut) tubenose identified being a juvenile Northern Giant Petrel. White-fronted Terns were around as well but quite far out. As an aside, multiple NZ Pipits were at all three carparks I visited here.

Ah well--once again--not a complete shut out so I'll take it! Would love to hear from others on their favourite local seawatching spots.

Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>

Today started off quite poorly just after arriving at Ruapuke Beach pre-dawn. As I confidently strode across a stream in my gumboots, I soon discovered that this stream was far too deep... 'jandals for the rest of the day it is then... Perhaps this was a sign, as the only bird I saw over the ocean from the main Ruapuke Beach access was 1 Black-backed Gull! I also learned a valuable lesson: You can't patrol a beach for wrecks when there is no beach (high tide/rough swell.... duh). Things perked up when I popped into the Swann Rd Access at the north end of the beach. There was still no beach but in quick succession I scoped a White-capped Albatross, Buller's Albatross, and a gannet. Off to Ruapuke Rock!

I spent about an hour and half above Ruapuke Rock (sure to be a ways away from rogue wave range). Visibility was generally quite good with only a few spits. Unfortunately there were no bait balls (fish work-ups attracting flocks of birds) like my last visit so while there were plenty of Fluttering Shearwaters around, they were quite dispersed and far out. A few gannets fished close to shore but most were at least 3 km offshore. Surprisingly, I only saw a handful of White-capped Albatrosses in my hour+ stint with the only other (non-Flut) tubenose identified being a juvenile Northern Giant Petrel. White-fronted Terns were around as well but quite far out. As an aside, multiple NZ Pipits were at all three carparks I visited here.

Ah well--once again--not a complete shut out so I'll take it! Would love to hear from others on their favourite local seawatching spots.

Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Huntly Lakes Report (1400 Shoveler!) :: Author RussCannings]]> 2018-07-11T19:14:47+12:00 2018-07-11T19:14:47+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7841&p=37390#p37390 viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7840), I made my way inland to the Huntly area. There are numerous large peat lakes between Whangamarino and Te Awamutu and I try to visit most of them every couple of months at least just to see what's what. Today took me to the main ones around Huntly, including the two largest--Whangape and Waikare. In general these lakes can be quite disappointing, as the habitat appears superficially tantalising but the water is so heavily sedimented that it is unsuitable for most foraging ducks.

Today all lakes held good numbers of swan and Canada Goose though most of the swans were foraging in adjacent fields (easily 1000+ of both total). All 4 regular shag species were present at virtually every site, with Pied Shag being the most common at several spots (This is one of the few spots in NZ where this species is found commonly inland). I checked A LOT of cattle herds today but no white egrets came into view sadly. But back to waterfowl, if swans, geese, and coromorants are so abundant, shouldn't ducks be too? Well actually, for the most part I could count the number of ducks on a single lake on my hand! This isn't too unusual for these lakes however (As I mentioned earlier).

So.... Imagine my surprise when I came upon a flock of close to 2,000 dabbling ducks on the east side of Lake Waikare just on dusk. "Hmmm, must be a large roosting flock of mallards, in from some flooded maize fields", I thought to myself. Put the scope up and most of them were shoveler! I counted through several times and estimated a minimum of 1,400 shoveler, and 400+ Mallard, along with a handful of Grey Teal. But where are these shoveler feeding during the day? I have never seen an inland Waikato flock of shoveler greater than 100 birds (and the largest group I've seen around Miranda was 400 or so). I see the odd one here or there around Huntly but I've never seen numbers anything like this. Are they in the field during the day with mallards? They certainly wouldn't fit on the Te Kauwhat WTP!

Anyway, you would think there had to be a Northern in there right? Well frustratingly the birds were backlit (sunset) at my position and a breeze made most birds turn away from me and bob in the waves. I spent an hour or so trying to pick out a possible northern but to no avail. Best thing would be to check this spot first thing in the morning. I have marked the flock on the map below. There is an unmarked pull-off picnic/boat launch area right beside it off the Waikare Rd (east side of lake). Worth checking out this flock in better light as this is where you might find a pintail or gargany or some such juicy thing. Also in the area were at least 13 Caspian Tern roosting on some rocks.
Waikare.PNG


Would love to hear more from Waikato veterans about shoveler numbers and movements from past and present surveys.

Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ

Attachments



Waikare.PNG (852.54 KiB)


]]>
viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7840), I made my way inland to the Huntly area. There are numerous large peat lakes between Whangamarino and Te Awamutu and I try to visit most of them every couple of months at least just to see what's what. Today took me to the main ones around Huntly, including the two largest--Whangape and Waikare. In general these lakes can be quite disappointing, as the habitat appears superficially tantalising but the water is so heavily sedimented that it is unsuitable for most foraging ducks.

Today all lakes held good numbers of swan and Canada Goose though most of the swans were foraging in adjacent fields (easily 1000+ of both total). All 4 regular shag species were present at virtually every site, with Pied Shag being the most common at several spots (This is one of the few spots in NZ where this species is found commonly inland). I checked A LOT of cattle herds today but no white egrets came into view sadly. But back to waterfowl, if swans, geese, and coromorants are so abundant, shouldn't ducks be too? Well actually, for the most part I could count the number of ducks on a single lake on my hand! This isn't too unusual for these lakes however (As I mentioned earlier).

So.... Imagine my surprise when I came upon a flock of close to 2,000 dabbling ducks on the east side of Lake Waikare just on dusk. "Hmmm, must be a large roosting flock of mallards, in from some flooded maize fields", I thought to myself. Put the scope up and most of them were shoveler! I counted through several times and estimated a minimum of 1,400 shoveler, and 400+ Mallard, along with a handful of Grey Teal. But where are these shoveler feeding during the day? I have never seen an inland Waikato flock of shoveler greater than 100 birds (and the largest group I've seen around Miranda was 400 or so). I see the odd one here or there around Huntly but I've never seen numbers anything like this. Are they in the field during the day with mallards? They certainly wouldn't fit on the Te Kauwhat WTP!

Anyway, you would think there had to be a Northern in there right? Well frustratingly the birds were backlit (sunset) at my position and a breeze made most birds turn away from me and bob in the waves. I spent an hour or so trying to pick out a possible northern but to no avail. Best thing would be to check this spot first thing in the morning. I have marked the flock on the map below. There is an unmarked pull-off picnic/boat launch area right beside it off the Waikare Rd (east side of lake). Worth checking out this flock in better light as this is where you might find a pintail or gargany or some such juicy thing. Also in the area were at least 13 Caspian Tern roosting on some rocks.
Waikare.PNG


Would love to hear more from Waikato veterans about shoveler numbers and movements from past and present surveys.

Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ

Attachments



Waikare.PNG (852.54 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Black Stilt pair reported near Hokitika :: Reply by mccoy]]> 2018-07-11T21:42:08+12:00 2018-07-11T21:42:08+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6111&p=37392#p37392 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Black Stilt pair reported near Hokitika :: Reply by Davidthomas]]> 2018-07-12T06:17:36+12:00 2018-07-12T06:17:36+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6111&p=37394#p37394 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Black Stilt pair reported near Hokitika :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-07-12T10:14:40+12:00 2018-07-12T10:14:40+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6111&p=37397#p37397 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Black Stilt pair reported near Hokitika :: Reply by mccoy]]> 2018-07-12T20:13:13+12:00 2018-07-12T20:13:13+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6111&p=37401#p37401 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Grebes at Elterwater, Marlborough :: Reply by Jake]]> 2018-07-04T18:49:28+12:00 2018-07-04T18:49:28+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7477&p=37360#p37360 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Jan 12--Hoary-headed Grebe at Elterwater :: Reply by Graeme T]]> 2018-07-13T22:43:28+12:00 2018-07-13T22:43:28+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7477&p=37404#p37404 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: South Polar Skua, Kariotahi :: Author Davidthomas]]> 2018-07-14T12:39:30+12:00 2018-07-14T12:39:30+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7843&p=37406#p37406
From Paul G]]>

From Paul G]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Tutukaka Pelagic Seabird Trip Results - 7 July 2018 - inc Blue Petrel & Soft-Plumaged Petrel :: Author ourspot]]> 2018-07-07T21:09:14+12:00 2018-07-14T14:57:10+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7834&p=37369#p37369
During the trip we sighted 24 different seabird species. A fantastic day out.

Highlights of the trip were:
1 Blue Petrel
1 Soft-plumaged Petrel
1 Thin-billed Prion
5 Broad-billed Prion
15 Antarctic Prion
1 Arctic Tern
1 Southern Giant Petrel
Huge amount of Common Diving Petrel

Cheers Scott
021 322 324 | scott@ourspot.nz

—————————————————————

So here’s the full trip results:

1 Blue Petrel
1 Soft-plumaged Petrel
1 Thin-billed Prion
5 Broad-billed Prion
15 Antarctic Prion
4 Buller's Mollymawk
6 White-capped Albatross
5 Campbell Mollymawk
2 Northern Royal Albatross
5 New Zealand Wandering Albatross
1 Southern Giant Petrel
2 Northern Giant Petrel
2 Cape Petrel
36 Grey-faced Petrel
2 Cook's Petrel
2000 Fairy Prion
50 Little Shearwater
3 Fluttering Shearwater
1000 Common Diving-Petrel
1 New Zealand Storm-Petrel
1 Arctic Tern
1 Pied Shag
440 Australasian Gannet
260 Red-billed Gull

Poor Knights Islands sightings (on or flying above)
1 Swamp Harrier]]>

During the trip we sighted 24 different seabird species. A fantastic day out.

Highlights of the trip were:
1 Blue Petrel
1 Soft-plumaged Petrel
1 Thin-billed Prion
5 Broad-billed Prion
15 Antarctic Prion
1 Arctic Tern
1 Southern Giant Petrel
Huge amount of Common Diving Petrel

Cheers Scott
021 322 324 | scott@ourspot.nz

—————————————————————

So here’s the full trip results:

1 Blue Petrel
1 Soft-plumaged Petrel
1 Thin-billed Prion
5 Broad-billed Prion
15 Antarctic Prion
4 Buller's Mollymawk
6 White-capped Albatross
5 Campbell Mollymawk
2 Northern Royal Albatross
5 New Zealand Wandering Albatross
1 Southern Giant Petrel
2 Northern Giant Petrel
2 Cape Petrel
36 Grey-faced Petrel
2 Cook's Petrel
2000 Fairy Prion
50 Little Shearwater
3 Fluttering Shearwater
1000 Common Diving-Petrel
1 New Zealand Storm-Petrel
1 Arctic Tern
1 Pied Shag
440 Australasian Gannet
260 Red-billed Gull

Poor Knights Islands sightings (on or flying above)
1 Swamp Harrier]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic Seabird Trip Results - 7th July 2018 :: Reply by Davidthomas]]> 2018-07-07T21:46:42+12:00 2018-07-07T21:46:42+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7834&p=37370#p37370 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic Seabird Trip Results - 7 July 2018 - inc Blue Petrel & Soft-Plumaged Petrel :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-07-09T17:41:45+12:00 2018-07-09T17:41:45+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7834&p=37375#p37375
PetrelBlue1.JPG

PetrelSoftPlum2.JPG

PetrelNthSth.JPG

Attachments



PetrelBlue1.JPG (317.95 KiB)



PetrelSoftPlum2.JPG (356.59 KiB)



PetrelNthSth.JPG (497.02 KiB)


]]>

PetrelBlue1.JPG

PetrelSoftPlum2.JPG

PetrelNthSth.JPG

Attachments



PetrelBlue1.JPG (317.95 KiB)



PetrelSoftPlum2.JPG (356.59 KiB)



PetrelNthSth.JPG (497.02 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic Seabird Trip Results - 7 July 2018 - inc Blue Petrel & Soft-Plumaged Petrel :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-07-09T17:44:31+12:00 2018-07-10T10:35:40+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7834&p=37376#p37376
PrionBroadBill1.JPG

Prion5.JPG

AlbatrossW2.JPG

Attachments



AlbatrossW2.JPG (234.06 KiB)



PrionBroadBill1.JPG (414.98 KiB)



Prion5.JPG (287.54 KiB)


]]>

PrionBroadBill1.JPG

Prion5.JPG

AlbatrossW2.JPG

Attachments



AlbatrossW2.JPG (234.06 KiB)



PrionBroadBill1.JPG (414.98 KiB)



Prion5.JPG (287.54 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic Seabird Trip Results - 7 July 2018 - inc Blue Petrel & Soft-Plumaged Petrel :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-07-09T18:25:49+12:00 2018-07-09T18:25:49+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7834&p=37377#p37377
Tough age on the Wanderer but the warm brownish tones to the cap are suggestive of Gibson's to me rather than the solid blackish cap of Antipodian.

Russ]]>

Tough age on the Wanderer but the warm brownish tones to the cap are suggestive of Gibson's to me rather than the solid blackish cap of Antipodian.

Russ]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic Seabird Trip Results - 7 July 2018 - inc Blue Petrel & Soft-Plumaged Petrel :: Reply by CMKMStephens]]> 2018-07-09T20:44:10+12:00 2018-07-09T20:44:10+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7834&p=37378#p37378 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic Seabird Trip Results - 7 July 2018 - inc Blue Petrel & Soft-Plumaged Petrel :: Reply by Matthias]]> 2018-07-10T22:38:56+12:00 2018-07-16T09:51:32+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7834&p=37385#p37385 Cheers
Matthias]]>
Cheers
Matthias]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic Seabird Trip Results - 7 July 2018 - inc Blue Petrel & Soft-Plumaged Petrel :: Reply by ourspot]]> 2018-07-14T15:00:26+12:00 2018-07-14T15:00:26+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7834&p=37408#p37408
Cheers
Scott]]>

Cheers
Scott]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: 10 Black fronted terns at Thornton :: Author Raewyn]]> 2018-07-14T22:35:01+12:00 2018-07-14T22:35:01+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7845&p=37410#p37410

Attachments



IMG_4087cr.jpg (359.32 KiB)


]]>

Attachments



IMG_4087cr.jpg (359.32 KiB)


]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 10 Black fronted terns at Thornton :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-07-15T07:52:36+12:00 2018-07-15T07:52:36+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7845&p=37411#p37411 Thanks again
All the best
Tim]]>
Thanks again
All the best
Tim]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 10 Black fronted terns at Thornton :: Reply by Raewyn]]> 2018-07-15T09:14:46+12:00 2018-07-15T09:14:46+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7845&p=37412#p37412 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Cattle egrets - Mangawhai :: Reply by Ian Southey]]> 2018-07-15T11:59:40+12:00 2018-07-15T11:59:40+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6862&p=37413#p37413
Ian]]>

Ian]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington City biodiversity :: Reply by CMKMStephens]]> 2018-07-05T20:17:10+12:00 2018-07-05T20:17:10+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=694&p=37361#p37361
Image
Image]]>

Image
Image]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington City biodiversity :: Reply by Peter Hodge]]> 2018-07-06T07:52:35+12:00 2018-07-06T07:52:35+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=694&p=37362#p37362 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington City biodiversity :: Reply by Colin Miskelly]]> 2018-07-15T21:18:46+12:00 2018-07-15T21:18:46+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=694&p=37416#p37416 Cheers
Colin]]>
Cheers
Colin]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington City biodiversity :: Reply by ashercook]]> 2018-07-16T17:42:41+12:00 2018-07-16T17:42:41+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=694&p=37422#p37422
Also saw a NZ falcon on the skyline walkway on the same day.]]>

Also saw a NZ falcon on the skyline walkway on the same day.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington City biodiversity :: Reply by George Hobson]]> 2018-07-16T17:56:20+12:00 2018-07-16T17:56:20+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=694&p=37423#p37423 Good views eliminated Fluttering due to the smokey underwing and no white saddlebags.]]> Good views eliminated Fluttering due to the smokey underwing and no white saddlebags.]]> <![CDATA[South Pacific Birds :: Re: Lord Howe Birding :: Reply by Pete McClelland]]> 2018-06-20T20:27:47+12:00 2018-06-20T20:27:47+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=2698&p=37247#p37247 <![CDATA[South Pacific Birds :: Re: Lord Howe Birding :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-06-22T12:35:25+12:00 2018-06-22T12:35:25+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=2698&p=37266#p37266 <![CDATA[South Pacific Birds :: Re: Lord Howe Birding :: Reply by Pete McClelland]]> 2018-06-23T17:38:13+12:00 2018-06-23T17:38:13+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=2698&p=37274#p37274 <![CDATA[South Pacific Birds :: Re: Lord Howe Birding :: Reply by Pete McClelland]]> 2018-06-30T10:33:53+12:00 2018-06-30T10:33:53+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=2698&p=37343#p37343 A goldfinch was also reported recently but I haven't seen it myself. Not many waders around at present so making do watching the banded rails out the window washing on puddles from the recent rain.]]> A goldfinch was also reported recently but I haven't seen it myself. Not many waders around at present so making do watching the banded rails out the window washing on puddles from the recent rain.]]> <![CDATA[South Pacific Birds :: Re: Lord Howe Birding :: Reply by Pete McClelland]]> 2018-07-07T19:20:56+12:00 2018-07-07T19:20:56+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=2698&p=37368#p37368 https://www.lordhoweislandbirds.com, so as soon as anything unusual comes around he's wiping the fish off his hands and picking up the camera. The burly trail, shark liver in a bucket, serves a double purpose of attracting both the fish and the birds.
During our 7 hour trip we not only got as good feed of fish but saw
Black browed Mollymawk
Campbell Black Browed Mollymawk
Salvins Mollmawk
Wandering albatross
Sooty Albatross
Kermadec Petrel (light and dark phase)- around here this species only breeds at Balls pyramid
Providence petrels (lots and lots)
Grey ternlet
Black Noddy
Fairy Prion
White headed petrel
Masked booby
Red Tailed tropic bird

Not bad for a fishing trip. Jack has taken out a couple of birding focused trips recently which have not been as diverse as ours but they still ticked off a few species such as the kermadec petrels and white bellied storm petrels. One got a Great winged petrel.

An interesting observation on our trip was the Salvins Molly diving for food. I had read they were capable of this and had seen them upend to body length under water but this one was swimming after the bait as it went down for several metres. It came up like a cork so I presume it was hard work to get down and stay down.

Jack runs birding charters when there is the demand but is happy to take birders along on fishing trips which can be just as productive, or just join a sight seeing trip to balls pyramid - the birds (or the pyramid are a bonus depending on your perspective.

Looks like the wood sandpiper has moved on but will keep an eye out for it.]]>
https://www.lordhoweislandbirds.com, so as soon as anything unusual comes around he's wiping the fish off his hands and picking up the camera. The burly trail, shark liver in a bucket, serves a double purpose of attracting both the fish and the birds.
During our 7 hour trip we not only got as good feed of fish but saw
Black browed Mollymawk
Campbell Black Browed Mollymawk
Salvins Mollmawk
Wandering albatross
Sooty Albatross
Kermadec Petrel (light and dark phase)- around here this species only breeds at Balls pyramid
Providence petrels (lots and lots)
Grey ternlet
Black Noddy
Fairy Prion
White headed petrel
Masked booby
Red Tailed tropic bird

Not bad for a fishing trip. Jack has taken out a couple of birding focused trips recently which have not been as diverse as ours but they still ticked off a few species such as the kermadec petrels and white bellied storm petrels. One got a Great winged petrel.

An interesting observation on our trip was the Salvins Molly diving for food. I had read they were capable of this and had seen them upend to body length under water but this one was swimming after the bait as it went down for several metres. It came up like a cork so I presume it was hard work to get down and stay down.

Jack runs birding charters when there is the demand but is happy to take birders along on fishing trips which can be just as productive, or just join a sight seeing trip to balls pyramid - the birds (or the pyramid are a bonus depending on your perspective.

Looks like the wood sandpiper has moved on but will keep an eye out for it.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Taxonomy and Nomenclature :: Whenua Hou Diving Petrel :: Author Ian Southey]]> 2018-06-28T14:16:23+12:00 2018-06-28T14:16:23+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=7823&p=37318#p37318
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/articl ... ne.0197766

And thanks Johannes for putting this out with open access. It's nice to be able to keep up.

Ian]]>

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/articl ... ne.0197766

And thanks Johannes for putting this out with open access. It's nice to be able to keep up.

Ian]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Taxonomy and Nomenclature :: Re: Whenua Hou Diving Petrel :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-06-29T21:52:01+12:00 2018-06-29T21:52:01+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=7823&p=37337#p37337 https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/new-zeal ... sland.html]]> https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/new-zeal ... sland.html]]> <![CDATA[Bird Taxonomy and Nomenclature :: Re: Endemic NZ Swan :: Reply by Ian Southey]]> 2018-07-15T17:25:07+12:00 2018-07-15T17:25:07+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=6960&p=37414#p37414
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epd ... /eva.12535

https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... tano_et_al

https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... lack_swans

Ian]]>

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epd ... /eva.12535

https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... tano_et_al

https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... lack_swans

Ian]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Taxonomy and Nomenclature :: Re: Endemic NZ Swan :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-07-16T14:26:38+12:00 2018-07-16T14:26:38+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=6960&p=37420#p37420 I must admit I find the hypothesis a little beyond belief!
Black swans are fairly large obvious birds - surely there would have been some sightings if a population had persisted in NZ prir to the re-introductions.

cheers
Jim]]>
I must admit I find the hypothesis a little beyond belief!
Black swans are fairly large obvious birds - surely there would have been some sightings if a population had persisted in NZ prir to the re-introductions.

cheers
Jim]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Taxonomy and Nomenclature :: Evolution of a mountain specialist family, the accentors :: Author Michael Szabo]]> 2018-07-17T08:44:56+12:00 2018-07-17T08:44:56+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=7847&p=37424#p37424 BOU blog, July 2018
Per Alström, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Uppsala University, Sweden

"It is fascinating to note that some species have dramatically changed their ranges over a few decades. It is even more intriguing to try to understand which factors have shaped the current distributional patterns, and how these have varied through historical times. For example, some species or groups of closely related species are very patchily distributed across seemingly fairly homogeneous environments, suggesting that they were once more widespread, or that they have successfully colonized geographically disjunct areas. Climatic change, and resulting habitat transformations, have had profound impact on bird distributions."

Link": https://www.bou.org.uk/blog-alstrom-evo ... accentors/]]>
BOU blog, July 2018
Per Alström, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Uppsala University, Sweden

"It is fascinating to note that some species have dramatically changed their ranges over a few decades. It is even more intriguing to try to understand which factors have shaped the current distributional patterns, and how these have varied through historical times. For example, some species or groups of closely related species are very patchily distributed across seemingly fairly homogeneous environments, suggesting that they were once more widespread, or that they have successfully colonized geographically disjunct areas. Climatic change, and resulting habitat transformations, have had profound impact on bird distributions."

Link": https://www.bou.org.uk/blog-alstrom-evo ... accentors/]]>
<![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Southern Elephant Seal, Kaikoura :: Author Michael Szabo]]> 2018-07-03T18:30:11+12:00 2018-07-03T18:30:11+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=7832&p=37355#p37355
Link to photo: https://scontent.fpmr1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/ ... e=5BDF00A4]]>

Link to photo: https://scontent.fpmr1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/ ... e=5BDF00A4]]>
<![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Southern Right Whale, Wellington Harbour :: Author Michael Szabo]]> 2018-07-03T15:54:27+12:00 2018-07-03T15:54:27+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=7831&p=37354#p37354
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1449950 ... 492520155/]]>

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1449950 ... 492520155/]]>
<![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Re: Southern Right Whale, Wellington Harbour :: Reply by Michael Szabo]]> 2018-07-04T14:48:56+12:00 2018-07-04T14:48:56+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=7831&p=37359#p37359 <![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Re: Southern Right Whale, Wellington Harbour :: Reply by Michael Szabo]]> 2018-07-07T14:18:32+12:00 2018-07-07T14:18:32+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=7831&p=37365#p37365
It has continued to be present in the harbour this week, mostly in the area near the Interislander ferry terminal, but also off the Queen's Wharf area and over towards Oriental Bay. Most spectacular has been its sporadic breaching.

Link: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/105235 ... on-harbour]]>

It has continued to be present in the harbour this week, mostly in the area near the Interislander ferry terminal, but also off the Queen's Wharf area and over towards Oriental Bay. Most spectacular has been its sporadic breaching.

Link: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/105235 ... on-harbour]]>
<![CDATA[Events :: NZ Garden Bird Survey :: Author Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-07-02T09:10:47+12:00 2018-07-02T09:10:47+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7830&p=37353#p37353 https://form-gardenbirdsurvey.landcareresearch.co.nz/
Some great result starting to come from what is one of the longest running citizen science projects in New Zealand. I have honestly been quite impressed with how consistent some of the emerging trends are with some other bird monitoring programs.]]>
https://form-gardenbirdsurvey.landcareresearch.co.nz/
Some great result starting to come from what is one of the longest running citizen science projects in New Zealand. I have honestly been quite impressed with how consistent some of the emerging trends are with some other bird monitoring programs.]]>