<![CDATA[BirdingNZ.net]]> http://www.birdingnz.net/forum 2018-04-20T20:59:12+12:00 Smartfeed Extension for phpBB 3.1 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Beach wrecks Tahuna Torea - id request :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-03-23T17:39:32+13:00 2018-03-23T17:39:32+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7644&p=36467#p36467 Photo 2: 1-year-old Kelp gull]]> Photo 2: 1-year-old Kelp gull]]> <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Nocturnal records of seabirds flying across Auckland isthmus :: Author Trina]]> 2018-03-25T10:49:44+13:00 2018-03-25T10:49:44+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7657&p=36478#p36478
I am trying to find documented evidence of nocturnal seabird movements (e.g. Cook's petrel) across the isthmus near the Whau River Estuary & Te Atatu Peninsula. Does anyone have any records that could be used to inform the instigating of management actions for this part of the Northern Flyway?

I would appreciate any information you may have.

Thanks,
Trina.]]>

I am trying to find documented evidence of nocturnal seabird movements (e.g. Cook's petrel) across the isthmus near the Whau River Estuary & Te Atatu Peninsula. Does anyone have any records that could be used to inform the instigating of management actions for this part of the Northern Flyway?

I would appreciate any information you may have.

Thanks,
Trina.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Spotless crake record at Harbourview Orangihina, Te Atatu Peninsula :: Author Trina]]> 2018-03-25T11:27:04+13:00 2018-03-25T11:27:04+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7658&p=36479#p36479
Spotless crake are identified as being seen at Pollen Island in the Waitemata Harbour (its on their brochure) and a record is attributed to the wetland at Harbourview Orangihina. Does anyone know where the record for Harbourview came from? I and others have been trying to find out without success.

I would like to know how old this record is and if it can be relied upon.

thanks,
Trina.]]>

Spotless crake are identified as being seen at Pollen Island in the Waitemata Harbour (its on their brochure) and a record is attributed to the wetland at Harbourview Orangihina. Does anyone know where the record for Harbourview came from? I and others have been trying to find out without success.

I would like to know how old this record is and if it can be relied upon.

thanks,
Trina.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Questions Birding near Queenstown and Milford Sound in March :: Reply by mark ayre]]> 2018-03-25T18:29:20+13:00 2018-03-25T18:29:20+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7615&p=36483#p36483
Cheers mark]]>

Cheers mark]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Red-billed Gull feeding technique :: Reply by haggarty]]> 2018-03-26T21:32:13+13:00 2018-03-26T21:32:13+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7603&p=36495#p36495 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Red-billed Gull feeding technique :: Reply by GrahamB]]> 2018-03-29T09:31:18+13:00 2018-03-29T09:31:18+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7603&p=36514#p36514
Cheers
GrahamB]]>

Cheers
GrahamB]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Red-billed Gull feeding technique :: Reply by zarkov]]> 2018-03-29T20:03:03+13:00 2018-03-29T20:03:03+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7603&p=36521#p36521 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Mystery bird call near Glenorchy :: Reply by simon.fordham]]> 2018-03-22T09:35:20+13:00 2018-03-22T09:35:20+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7647&p=36461#p36461
Cheers
Simon]]>

Cheers
Simon]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Mystery bird call near Glenorchy :: Reply by Davidthomas]]> 2018-03-22T10:02:32+13:00 2018-03-22T10:02:32+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7647&p=36462#p36462 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Mystery bird call near Glenorchy :: Reply by Nick Allen]]> 2018-03-29T22:51:22+13:00 2018-03-29T22:51:22+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7647&p=36524#p36524 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Upcoming Tutukaka Pelagic Seabird Trips - April to July 2018 :: Reply by ourspot]]> 2018-04-03T07:57:17+12:00 2018-04-03T07:57:17+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7574&p=36568#p36568 – Sunday 29th April 2018 (4 spaces available)
– Sunday 27th May 2018 (4 spaces available)
– Sunday 8th July 2018 (6 spaces available)

Cheers Scott]]>
– Sunday 29th April 2018 (4 spaces available)
– Sunday 27th May 2018 (4 spaces available)
– Sunday 8th July 2018 (6 spaces available)

Cheers Scott]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Danseys Pass & rock wrens? :: Reply by FlyingKiwiGirl]]> 2018-04-06T19:36:40+12:00 2018-04-06T19:36:40+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7564&p=36610#p36610 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: falcon :: Reply by FlyingKiwiGirl]]> 2018-04-06T19:52:32+12:00 2018-04-06T19:52:32+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7518&p=36612#p36612 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Warming oceans could put seabirds out of sync with prey :: Reply by Michael Szabo]]> 2018-04-07T09:30:59+12:00 2018-04-07T09:30:59+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=2730&p=36617#p36617
A team from British Antarctic Survey along with colleagues at the University of Edinburgh and Centre for Ecology & Hydrology studied data on the breeding patterns of 62 seabird species between 1952 and 2016, as sea surface temperatures rose sharply. They found that seabirds have not altered their breeding times in response to rising temperatures. Previous research has shown however that climate change has brought forward when many prey species – including squid, shrimp and small fish – reproduce. Seabirds have much longer lifespans than their prey and do not reproduce until they are a few years old, which means it takes them many more generations to adapt, researchers say.

The team assessed 145 bird populations at 60 locations across every continent. These included the British Antarctic Survey's sub-Antarctic Bird Island Research Station and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology's field site on the Isle of May in the Firth of Forth. The study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change this week (2 April 2018), received funding from the Natural Environment Research Council. Lead author Katharine Keogan, at the University of Edinburgh's School of Biological Sciences, said: "Many plants and animals now breed earlier than in previous decades, so our finding that seabirds haven't responded to changing environments is really surprising."

Dr. Sue Lewis, of the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, said: "This collaboration was a global team effort, bringing together many of the world's seabird scientists and the data they have spent many years collecting. Uniting these studies has allowed us to draw powerful conclusions about the climate response of one of the most vulnerable bird groups on the planet."

Link to paper: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-018-0115-z]]>

A team from British Antarctic Survey along with colleagues at the University of Edinburgh and Centre for Ecology & Hydrology studied data on the breeding patterns of 62 seabird species between 1952 and 2016, as sea surface temperatures rose sharply. They found that seabirds have not altered their breeding times in response to rising temperatures. Previous research has shown however that climate change has brought forward when many prey species – including squid, shrimp and small fish – reproduce. Seabirds have much longer lifespans than their prey and do not reproduce until they are a few years old, which means it takes them many more generations to adapt, researchers say.

The team assessed 145 bird populations at 60 locations across every continent. These included the British Antarctic Survey's sub-Antarctic Bird Island Research Station and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology's field site on the Isle of May in the Firth of Forth. The study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change this week (2 April 2018), received funding from the Natural Environment Research Council. Lead author Katharine Keogan, at the University of Edinburgh's School of Biological Sciences, said: "Many plants and animals now breed earlier than in previous decades, so our finding that seabirds haven't responded to changing environments is really surprising."

Dr. Sue Lewis, of the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, said: "This collaboration was a global team effort, bringing together many of the world's seabird scientists and the data they have spent many years collecting. Uniting these studies has allowed us to draw powerful conclusions about the climate response of one of the most vulnerable bird groups on the planet."

Link to paper: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-018-0115-z]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Royal Spoonbill distribution :: Reply by FlyingKiwiGirl]]> 2018-04-06T19:42:56+12:00 2018-04-06T19:42:56+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7581&p=36611#p36611 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Royal Spoonbill distribution :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-04-07T21:06:01+12:00 2018-04-07T21:06:01+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7581&p=36620#p36620 cheers]]> cheers]]> <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Weka on Waiheke Island :: Reply by jdowding]]> 2018-04-07T22:07:39+12:00 2018-04-07T22:07:39+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=6297&p=36622#p36622 We have a family bach at the eastern end of Onetangi, and where we are is surrounded by rough pasture and scrub/bush - definitely suitable habitat. We visit twice a year on average and I haven't yet seen or heard weka there.
Yes, weka could have an impact on NZ dotterels. However, there are relatively few pairs in the current core weka range around the eastern end of the island; however, when they get to high densities around Whakanewha (where dotterels are managed and there is a lot of predator control), things might get interesting.]]>
We have a family bach at the eastern end of Onetangi, and where we are is surrounded by rough pasture and scrub/bush - definitely suitable habitat. We visit twice a year on average and I haven't yet seen or heard weka there.
Yes, weka could have an impact on NZ dotterels. However, there are relatively few pairs in the current core weka range around the eastern end of the island; however, when they get to high densities around Whakanewha (where dotterels are managed and there is a lot of predator control), things might get interesting.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Chatham Island snipe :: Author Colin Miskelly]]> 2018-04-09T11:39:27+12:00 2018-04-09T11:39:27+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7690&p=36638#p36638
A recent visit to Rangatira Island provided an opportunity to observe details of Chatham Island snipe foraging and breeding ecology overlooked during my first visit to the island 34 years ago, as a result of changes in the island's vegetation as it recovers from the farming era (the last stock were removed in 1961).

Information and images in the Te Papa blog: The littlest snipe http://blog.tepapa.govt.nz/2018/04/09/the-littlest-snipe/

Cheers
Colin

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A recent visit to Rangatira Island provided an opportunity to observe details of Chatham Island snipe foraging and breeding ecology overlooked during my first visit to the island 34 years ago, as a result of changes in the island's vegetation as it recovers from the farming era (the last stock were removed in 1961).

Information and images in the Te Papa blog: The littlest snipe http://blog.tepapa.govt.nz/2018/04/09/the-littlest-snipe/

Cheers
Colin

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09 Chatham Island snippet.jpg (123.62 KiB)


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<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Petrels of Rangatira Island, Chatham Islands :: Author Colin Miskelly]]> 2018-04-11T16:44:55+12:00 2018-04-11T16:44:55+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7695&p=36662#p36662
The following blog about petrels on Rangatira (including methods used to protect Chatham petrels from broad-billed prions competing for burrows) has been posted on the Te Papa blog site:

http://blog.tepapa.govt.nz/2018/04/11/the-petrels-of-rangatira-island-chatham-islands/

Cheers
Colin

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The following blog about petrels on Rangatira (including methods used to protect Chatham petrels from broad-billed prions competing for burrows) has been posted on the Te Papa blog site:

http://blog.tepapa.govt.nz/2018/04/11/the-petrels-of-rangatira-island-chatham-islands/

Cheers
Colin

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10 Chatham petrel.jpg (119.72 KiB)


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<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: your help please! myna samples / info for research project :: Reply by Joanna10]]> 2018-04-05T21:58:39+12:00 2018-04-05T21:58:39+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7625&p=36600#p36600 I presume you will have checked the eBird range map to get some answer to your question re the distribution of Common mynas:

https://ebird.org/newzealand
They appear to be moving southward here in the Lower North Island - as recent sightings in Martinborough were apparently unusual.]]>
I presume you will have checked the eBird range map to get some answer to your question re the distribution of Common mynas:

https://ebird.org/newzealand
They appear to be moving southward here in the Lower North Island - as recent sightings in Martinborough were apparently unusual.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: your help please! myna samples / info for research project :: Reply by Anna Santure]]> 2018-04-06T19:27:21+12:00 2018-04-06T19:27:21+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7625&p=36608#p36608

We're particularly keen to get samples from these recent 'invasion fronts', so if anyone has a current trapping effort and would be happy to collect samples for us, it would be fabulous to hear from you!

Nga mihi nui,
Anna]]>


We're particularly keen to get samples from these recent 'invasion fronts', so if anyone has a current trapping effort and would be happy to collect samples for us, it would be fabulous to hear from you!

Nga mihi nui,
Anna]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: your help please! myna samples / info for research project :: Reply by Ian Southey]]> 2018-04-06T22:40:30+12:00 2018-04-06T22:40:30+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7625&p=36616#p36616
http://notornis.osnz.org.nz/system/file ... is_3_2.pdf - on p.57
http://notornis.osnz.org.nz/system/file ... is_4_4.pdf - on p.66

Ian]]>

http://notornis.osnz.org.nz/system/file ... is_3_2.pdf - on p.57
http://notornis.osnz.org.nz/system/file ... is_4_4.pdf - on p.66

Ian]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: your help please! myna samples / info for research project :: Reply by Anna Santure]]> 2018-04-08T14:36:07+12:00 2018-04-08T14:36:07+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7625&p=36629#p36629 It was really interesting to read your thoughts too regarding the edge of the range "wobbling" rather than moving - I was under the impression from talking to colleagues that there may be some evidence that ranges have been expanding recently, but you are absolutely correct that it is hard to tell whether it is an expansion or a temporary blip. There has certainly been quite a large expansion of mynas into Northland since Cunningham's publications.
Nga mihi nui - with many thanks,
Anna]]>
It was really interesting to read your thoughts too regarding the edge of the range "wobbling" rather than moving - I was under the impression from talking to colleagues that there may be some evidence that ranges have been expanding recently, but you are absolutely correct that it is hard to tell whether it is an expansion or a temporary blip. There has certainly been quite a large expansion of mynas into Northland since Cunningham's publications.
Nga mihi nui - with many thanks,
Anna]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: your help please! myna samples / info for research project :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-04-09T18:49:53+12:00 2018-04-09T18:49:53+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7625&p=36649#p36649 I would like to help you, but no dead birds sorry as freshly dead Indian mynas are very hard to get.

breeding season; Dec to March
Moulting season: Feb to June.
Becoming more common and spreading southward.
Varied diet, predominantly insects and fruits, plus pig foods
Do carry diseases from pig farms to pig farms.
High risk bird...they might oust native birds out of nest holes in trees.
Eggs, like starlings, but larger and more round.
Everywhere, roadsides, towns, farmland, beaches.

I had seen mynas catching and eating starling chicks, and in mid 1990s I watched a screaming juvenile myna being chased by a Australian magpie, which in turn been chased by a large flock of angry mynas. Mynas mobbed the magpie and flew after the magpie for 30 yards.
Black bases on yellow beaks, were absent during 1st autumn, arrived during 1st winter.

Often aggressive and I had seen mynas attacked Red-billed gulls and Australian magpies and mynas often got into fightings.

I do not have guns and gun license. sorry.

Clinton.]]>
I would like to help you, but no dead birds sorry as freshly dead Indian mynas are very hard to get.

breeding season; Dec to March
Moulting season: Feb to June.
Becoming more common and spreading southward.
Varied diet, predominantly insects and fruits, plus pig foods
Do carry diseases from pig farms to pig farms.
High risk bird...they might oust native birds out of nest holes in trees.
Eggs, like starlings, but larger and more round.
Everywhere, roadsides, towns, farmland, beaches.

I had seen mynas catching and eating starling chicks, and in mid 1990s I watched a screaming juvenile myna being chased by a Australian magpie, which in turn been chased by a large flock of angry mynas. Mynas mobbed the magpie and flew after the magpie for 30 yards.
Black bases on yellow beaks, were absent during 1st autumn, arrived during 1st winter.

Often aggressive and I had seen mynas attacked Red-billed gulls and Australian magpies and mynas often got into fightings.

I do not have guns and gun license. sorry.

Clinton.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: your help please! myna samples / info for research project :: Reply by mark ayre]]> 2018-04-09T20:22:04+12:00 2018-04-09T20:22:04+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7625&p=36650#p36650
cheers Mark]]>

cheers Mark]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: your help please! myna samples / info for research project :: Reply by Michael Szabo]]> 2018-04-09T20:27:13+12:00 2018-04-09T20:27:13+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7625&p=36651#p36651
Jan Walker also sent a comment to me today: "A couple turned up at Lyttelton on a ship a while ago and were dispatched, if I remember correctly."

I have also been told of 2 sightings south of Foxton in the past few months, where there seems to be a small breeding group - these were in Otaki and Waikanae.

I was also recently told by someone else that: "I've seen a couple [of Mynas] hanging around the Masterton landfill in the pine tree hedge for a few years now".

Regarding prey, I have seen one taking a large stick Insect into a nest to feed its chicks with.

I have also been told that they will invade nest holes occupied by native birds and then build their own nest on top of the existing nest even if it has chicks in it.]]>

Jan Walker also sent a comment to me today: "A couple turned up at Lyttelton on a ship a while ago and were dispatched, if I remember correctly."

I have also been told of 2 sightings south of Foxton in the past few months, where there seems to be a small breeding group - these were in Otaki and Waikanae.

I was also recently told by someone else that: "I've seen a couple [of Mynas] hanging around the Masterton landfill in the pine tree hedge for a few years now".

Regarding prey, I have seen one taking a large stick Insect into a nest to feed its chicks with.

I have also been told that they will invade nest holes occupied by native birds and then build their own nest on top of the existing nest even if it has chicks in it.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: your help please! myna samples / info for research project :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-04-09T22:06:38+12:00 2018-04-09T22:06:38+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7625&p=36652#p36652 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: your help please! myna samples / info for research project :: Reply by Anna Santure]]> 2018-04-10T18:13:28+12:00 2018-04-10T18:13:28+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7625&p=36657#p36657
It does seem that freshly dead mynas are rather elusive! We have had success at getting DNA out of birds that are not very fresh, but the main thing needed for our project is a reasonable sample (10-20 birds) from each location, so I fear that me driving around scraping mynas off the road may not cut it! With that in mind, I may look at requesting ethics permission from my university to enable sampling of mynas from areas where there is not a control trapping effort in place.

Please do keep me in mind if you hear of anyone currently trapping, and thank you again to everyone for the fantastic information above, and I'd love to keep hearing if you spot mynas in any other odd places.

Anna]]>

It does seem that freshly dead mynas are rather elusive! We have had success at getting DNA out of birds that are not very fresh, but the main thing needed for our project is a reasonable sample (10-20 birds) from each location, so I fear that me driving around scraping mynas off the road may not cut it! With that in mind, I may look at requesting ethics permission from my university to enable sampling of mynas from areas where there is not a control trapping effort in place.

Please do keep me in mind if you hear of anyone currently trapping, and thank you again to everyone for the fantastic information above, and I'd love to keep hearing if you spot mynas in any other odd places.

Anna]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: your help please! myna samples / info for research project :: Reply by Michael Szabo]]> 2018-04-10T19:36:25+12:00 2018-04-10T19:36:25+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7625&p=36658#p36658 adriangilbert@xtra.co.nz). He could possibly find you some carcasses.]]> adriangilbert@xtra.co.nz). He could possibly find you some carcasses.]]> <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: your help please! myna samples / info for research project :: Reply by Nick Allen]]> 2018-04-10T23:14:36+12:00 2018-04-10T23:14:36+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7625&p=36660#p36660 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: your help please! myna samples / info for research project :: Reply by Anna Santure]]> 2018-04-12T16:38:34+12:00 2018-04-12T16:38:34+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7625&p=36675#p36675 Oliver - indeed, really sad to see precious NZ species being gobbled by invaders :(
thanks Michael - yes I've been in touch with Adrian who is super kind and is actually helping to organise the collection of mynas for me both at his place and from a number of people / groups he's sold traps to in the far North, which is great!
Nick - thanks so much for the info - I think this is also reflected in JM Cunningham's papers from 1948 and 1951 that Ian uploaded to this forum too - I do wonder what "all centres" means though in terms of North Island cities / large towns! We are very lucky to have collaborators in Australia that we can compare samples to as I think it is really interesting to figure out whether NZ birds are from only one Australian population or a number of different introductions from different cities (likely Melbourne and/or Sydney). The good news is that genetics should be able to help us even if the records are a bit vague!]]>
Oliver - indeed, really sad to see precious NZ species being gobbled by invaders :(
thanks Michael - yes I've been in touch with Adrian who is super kind and is actually helping to organise the collection of mynas for me both at his place and from a number of people / groups he's sold traps to in the far North, which is great!
Nick - thanks so much for the info - I think this is also reflected in JM Cunningham's papers from 1948 and 1951 that Ian uploaded to this forum too - I do wonder what "all centres" means though in terms of North Island cities / large towns! We are very lucky to have collaborators in Australia that we can compare samples to as I think it is really interesting to figure out whether NZ birds are from only one Australian population or a number of different introductions from different cities (likely Melbourne and/or Sydney). The good news is that genetics should be able to help us even if the records are a bit vague!]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Fairy Tern advice :: Author Benjamin Bond]]> 2018-04-08T09:44:03+12:00 2018-04-08T09:44:03+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7688&p=36625#p36625 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Fairy Tern advice :: Reply by tim]]> 2018-04-08T13:02:57+12:00 2018-04-08T13:02:57+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7688&p=36627#p36627 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Fairy Tern advice :: Reply by Benjamin Bond]]> 2018-04-08T20:17:09+12:00 2018-04-08T20:17:09+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7688&p=36633#p36633 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Fairy Tern advice :: Reply by jdowding]]> 2018-04-09T00:05:01+12:00 2018-04-09T00:05:01+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7688&p=36634#p36634 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Fairy Tern advice :: Reply by Benjamin Bond]]> 2018-04-09T16:10:56+12:00 2018-04-09T16:10:56+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7688&p=36645#p36645 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Fairy Tern advice :: Reply by Benjamin Bond]]> 2018-04-11T20:36:52+12:00 2018-04-11T20:36:52+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7688&p=36666#p36666 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Fairy Tern advice :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-04-11T23:47:29+12:00 2018-04-11T23:47:29+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7688&p=36669#p36669 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Fairy Tern advice :: Reply by Benjamin Bond]]> 2018-04-12T11:29:03+12:00 2018-04-12T11:29:03+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7688&p=36671#p36671 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Fairy Tern advice :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-04-12T14:34:14+12:00 2018-04-12T14:34:14+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7688&p=36673#p36673 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Fairy Tern advice :: Reply by Benjamin Bond]]> 2018-04-12T19:18:46+12:00 2018-04-12T19:18:46+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7688&p=36676#p36676 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Fairy Tern advice :: Reply by Benjamin Bond]]> 2018-04-12T19:32:19+12:00 2018-04-12T19:32:19+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7688&p=36677#p36677 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Barn owls at Waotu? :: Author Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-04-17T13:55:26+12:00 2018-04-17T13:55:26+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7707&p=36706#p36706
The 25-hectare Jim Barnett Reserve sits alongside the Waikato River in Te Waotu region.

There are four walking tracks in this reserve
It is home to trees such as totara, rimu, tawa, mangeao and rewarewa and to birds such as the tui, fantail, kereru, bell bird, morepork, barn owl and the grey warbler.

Does anyone know anything about this? I presume it is an old sighting of a temporary vagrant, or perhaps a misidentification.

http://www.forestandbird.org.nz/branche ... tt-reserve]]>

The 25-hectare Jim Barnett Reserve sits alongside the Waikato River in Te Waotu region.

There are four walking tracks in this reserve
It is home to trees such as totara, rimu, tawa, mangeao and rewarewa and to birds such as the tui, fantail, kereru, bell bird, morepork, barn owl and the grey warbler.

Does anyone know anything about this? I presume it is an old sighting of a temporary vagrant, or perhaps a misidentification.

http://www.forestandbird.org.nz/branche ... tt-reserve]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Barn owls at Waotu? :: Reply by TheBirderman]]> 2018-04-17T19:07:46+12:00 2018-04-17T19:07:46+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7707&p=36709#p36709 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Barn owls at Waotu? :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-04-17T20:02:20+12:00 2018-04-17T20:02:20+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7707&p=36710#p36710 Will pass on anything useful I can find from the Forest and Bird contact.]]> Will pass on anything useful I can find from the Forest and Bird contact.]]> <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Ruru Nesting Boxes :: Reply by Joanna10]]> 2018-04-05T21:46:00+12:00 2018-04-05T21:46:00+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=4822&p=36599#p36599 Cheers, Joanna]]> Cheers, Joanna]]> <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Ruru Nesting Boxes :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-04-06T08:26:45+12:00 2018-04-06T08:26:45+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=4822&p=36601#p36601
I'm sure there was a piece in a recent F&B magazine about a guy in Coopers Beach using them.
My copy has mysteriously vanished ..so can't provide any more details sorry

cheers
Jim]]>

I'm sure there was a piece in a recent F&B magazine about a guy in Coopers Beach using them.
My copy has mysteriously vanished ..so can't provide any more details sorry

cheers
Jim]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Ruru Nesting Boxes :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-04-06T10:30:43+12:00 2018-04-06T10:30:43+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=4822&p=36602#p36602 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Ruru Nesting Boxes :: Reply by Joanna10]]> 2018-04-06T17:33:03+12:00 2018-04-06T17:33:03+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=4822&p=36603#p36603 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Ruru Nesting Boxes :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-04-10T22:32:55+12:00 2018-04-10T22:32:55+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=4822&p=36659#p36659 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Ruru Nesting Boxes :: Reply by Boris]]> 2018-04-19T11:59:30+12:00 2018-04-19T11:59:30+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=4822&p=36714#p36714
You need to place them away from direct sunlight, and with plenty of height. My starlings now do very well since I relocated the boxes.
Its also a good idea to mount them very strongly with steel straps and coach bolts. They can otherwise bounce around horribly in a gale. None of mine have ever come down thankfully. A good hole size for starlings is 44~45 mm (no smaller). If you want to keep starlings out, anything smaller than 35mm would be plenty small enough.]]>

You need to place them away from direct sunlight, and with plenty of height. My starlings now do very well since I relocated the boxes.
Its also a good idea to mount them very strongly with steel straps and coach bolts. They can otherwise bounce around horribly in a gale. None of mine have ever come down thankfully. A good hole size for starlings is 44~45 mm (no smaller). If you want to keep starlings out, anything smaller than 35mm would be plenty small enough.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Ruru Nesting Boxes :: Reply by zarkov]]> 2018-04-19T16:27:37+12:00 2018-04-19T16:27:37+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=4822&p=36716#p36716
Most people can't keep them out of their eaves, etc.]]>

Most people can't keep them out of their eaves, etc.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Morepork spotting locations in Auckland :: Reply by TheBirderman]]> 2018-04-19T20:11:09+12:00 2018-04-19T20:11:09+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7006&p=36718#p36718 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Flock of tui :: Author fras444]]> 2018-04-20T13:03:11+12:00 2018-04-20T13:03:11+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7709&p=36720#p36720 Taupo]]> Taupo]]> <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Birds that have not reached NZ, but should :: Reply by TheBirderman]]> 2018-04-20T15:19:51+12:00 2018-04-20T15:19:51+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=2649&p=36721#p36721 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Little egret - Mangere Sewage Ponds :: Reply by Wayfarer]]> 2018-03-23T13:45:43+13:00 2018-03-23T13:45:43+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7641&p=36466#p36466
We saw this bird on Wednesday afternoon last, a couple of hours after high tide. It flew in and landed at the far end of the storage pond, where it stayed (reasonably stationery) before relocating to the far bank, thereafter making its way around the fringes of the pond. We could see it making strikes into the water through our binos. After a time, in heavy rains, it took off and flew behind the row of large trees in the direction of the interior of Puketutu Island.
Beautiful little bird. Thanks for the posting/tip :)
LittleEgret.jpg

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We saw this bird on Wednesday afternoon last, a couple of hours after high tide. It flew in and landed at the far end of the storage pond, where it stayed (reasonably stationery) before relocating to the far bank, thereafter making its way around the fringes of the pond. We could see it making strikes into the water through our binos. After a time, in heavy rains, it took off and flew behind the row of large trees in the direction of the interior of Puketutu Island.
Beautiful little bird. Thanks for the posting/tip :)
LittleEgret.jpg

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Pied Stilt Hybrid :: Author Mike Vincent]]> 2018-03-23T19:12:24+13:00 2018-03-23T19:12:24+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7650&p=36468#p36468

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Pied Stilt Hybrid :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-03-24T11:09:23+13:00 2018-03-24T11:09:23+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7650&p=36471#p36471 http://notornis.osnz.org.nz/system/file ... s_31_2.pdf
Regards, Grahame]]>
http://notornis.osnz.org.nz/system/file ... s_31_2.pdf
Regards, Grahame]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Maketu and Little Waihi Update :: Author Tim Barnard]]> 2018-03-24T20:08:20+13:00 2018-03-24T20:08:20+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7652&p=36472#p36472
Cheers

Tim

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Cheers

Tim

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 2 Greater sand plover - Big Sand Island :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-03-24T20:41:26+13:00 2018-03-24T20:41:26+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7539&p=36473#p36473
Fingers crossed for a drier day tomorrow off Tutukaka+

Russ Cannings & Harry Boorman]]>

Fingers crossed for a drier day tomorrow off Tutukaka+

Russ Cannings & Harry Boorman]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Strange gull Akaroa 25 Feb :: Author Nick Allen]]> 2018-03-25T22:55:22+13:00 2018-03-25T22:55:22+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7660&p=36485#p36485
It had a black beak, which is strange in Akaroa, as I've only seen Red-billed & Black-backed Gulls there before. The legs seemed to be red. However check out the strange wingtip pattern... The bird was in moult, but it still looked weird.

Any thoughts as to what it is?

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It had a black beak, which is strange in Akaroa, as I've only seen Red-billed & Black-backed Gulls there before. The legs seemed to be red. However check out the strange wingtip pattern... The bird was in moult, but it still looked weird.

Any thoughts as to what it is?

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Strange gull Akaroa 250218 b

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Strange gull Akaroa 25 Feb :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-03-25T23:40:07+13:00 2018-03-25T23:40:07+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7660&p=36486#p36486 Black-billed gulls have expanded their range around banks peninsula and are regular at port levy, pigeon bay, little akaloa, okains bay and now akaroa harbour. So the first question is - if you ignore plumage did the structure and size of this bird match black-billed gull? At this time of year red legs on black bills is commonplace so nothing odd there, but that wing pattern is very odd.
If the head had some smudges and the bird's structure was more delicate than red or black billed gull, then the far eastern form of black- headed gull could be considered but the head looks all white and the bird is overall too pale.]]>
Black-billed gulls have expanded their range around banks peninsula and are regular at port levy, pigeon bay, little akaloa, okains bay and now akaroa harbour. So the first question is - if you ignore plumage did the structure and size of this bird match black-billed gull? At this time of year red legs on black bills is commonplace so nothing odd there, but that wing pattern is very odd.
If the head had some smudges and the bird's structure was more delicate than red or black billed gull, then the far eastern form of black- headed gull could be considered but the head looks all white and the bird is overall too pale.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Strange gull Akaroa 25 Feb :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-03-26T01:39:07+13:00 2018-03-26T01:39:07+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7660&p=36487#p36487 So this two photos were of two moulting adult Black-billed gulls and one moulting adult Red-billed gull.]]> So this two photos were of two moulting adult Black-billed gulls and one moulting adult Red-billed gull.]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Otago (Stewart Island) Shag Ashburton rivermouth :: Author andrewcrossland]]> 2018-03-26T22:29:50+13:00 2018-03-26T22:29:50+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7663&p=36496#p36496 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Otago (Stewart Island) Shag Ashburton rivermouth :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-03-27T10:27:30+13:00 2018-03-27T10:27:30+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7663&p=36497#p36497 Can you confirm that's 7000 (not 700)?
That amount of shags flying in would be an impressive sight

cheers
jim]]>
Can you confirm that's 7000 (not 700)?
That amount of shags flying in would be an impressive sight

cheers
jim]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Otago (Stewart Island) Shag Ashburton rivermouth :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-03-27T11:04:18+13:00 2018-03-27T11:04:18+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7663&p=36498#p36498
Ash S shag roost.jpg



And here's a pic (cell phone camera thru scope) of the Stewart Island Shag
Otago shag1.jpg

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Ash S shag roost.jpg



And here's a pic (cell phone camera thru scope) of the Stewart Island Shag
Otago shag1.jpg

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Otago (Stewart Island) Shag Ashburton rivermouth :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-03-27T14:28:42+13:00 2018-03-27T14:28:42+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7663&p=36501#p36501 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Little Waihi/Maketu - E7 :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-03-28T12:59:38+13:00 2018-03-28T12:59:38+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=435&p=36508#p36508 Just been handed a copy of this months National Geographic ... great to see the NZ Godwit's in the limelight and a mention of E7. The legend continues.
Cheers
Tim]]>
Just been handed a copy of this months National Geographic ... great to see the NZ Godwit's in the limelight and a mention of E7. The legend continues.
Cheers
Tim]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Little Waihi/Maketu - E7 :: Reply by philbattley]]> 2018-03-29T10:48:57+13:00 2018-03-29T10:48:57+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=435&p=36517#p36517 Phil]]> Phil]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tattler at Waikuku Beach :: Reply by Bev Alexander]]> 2018-03-29T18:46:36+13:00 2018-03-29T18:46:36+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7257&p=36519#p36519 Grey-Tailed Tattler still present at the Ashley estuary. Seen feeding along waters edge with 1 B.T.Godwit (mid in coming tide) today.
Happy Birding this weekend.
Bev. Alexander.]]>
Grey-Tailed Tattler still present at the Ashley estuary. Seen feeding along waters edge with 1 B.T.Godwit (mid in coming tide) today.
Happy Birding this weekend.
Bev. Alexander.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Kookaburra, Candia Road Henderson :: Author Chris Bindon]]> 2018-03-30T06:32:57+13:00 2018-03-30T06:32:57+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7666&p=36525#p36525 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Black Kite -Waihopai Valley :: Reply by Paul Gibson]]> 2018-03-30T09:47:05+13:00 2018-03-30T09:47:05+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7568&p=36526#p36526 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Falcon in Whakatane :: Author erikforsyth]]> 2018-03-31T09:46:02+13:00 2018-03-31T09:46:02+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7667&p=36531#p36531
NZ Falcon hunting through the gardens at the top end of Gorge Road this morning. Was also seen heading into the Mokorua Bush reserve on Thursday the 29th.

Best wishes
Erik Forsyth
Rockjumper Birding Tours
www.rockjumperbirding.com]]>

NZ Falcon hunting through the gardens at the top end of Gorge Road this morning. Was also seen heading into the Mokorua Bush reserve on Thursday the 29th.

Best wishes
Erik Forsyth
Rockjumper Birding Tours
www.rockjumperbirding.com]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Any news from Ellesmere this weekend? :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-03-31T13:54:27+13:00 2018-03-31T13:54:27+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7604&p=36532#p36532 The standout location at present is Jarvis rd whete there remains some great wader habitat and hundreds of both pied stilt and banded dotterel.
Still many migratory waders around - arctics seen today were:
2 red knot
4 Turnstone
14 pacific golden plover
4 curlew sandpiper (1 in breeding plumage )
4 sharp-tailed sandpiper
8 red necked stint
194 wrybill]]>
The standout location at present is Jarvis rd whete there remains some great wader habitat and hundreds of both pied stilt and banded dotterel.
Still many migratory waders around - arctics seen today were:
2 red knot
4 Turnstone
14 pacific golden plover
4 curlew sandpiper (1 in breeding plumage )
4 sharp-tailed sandpiper
8 red necked stint
194 wrybill]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Late show in cuckoos :: Author andrewcrossland]]> 2018-03-25T10:18:58+13:00 2018-03-25T10:18:58+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7656&p=36477#p36477 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Late show in cuckoos :: Reply by Steve Wood]]> 2018-03-25T17:47:07+13:00 2018-03-25T17:47:07+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7656&p=36482#p36482 One seen last weekend also in Kowhai tree, and silent. (Motueka)
Steve]]>
One seen last weekend also in Kowhai tree, and silent. (Motueka)
Steve]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Late show in cuckoos :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-03-31T13:57:47+13:00 2018-03-31T13:57:47+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7656&p=36533#p36533 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Common Tern - Kaipara North Head :: Author sav]]> 2018-03-31T17:55:31+13:00 2018-03-31T17:55:31+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7669&p=36535#p36535
There was a Common Tern with about 1500 White-fronted Terns on the beach at Pouto - on North Head Kaipara Harbour, this afternoon.

Not quite in full breeding plumage, with some white still on the forehead, but no carpal bar showing, and lovely silver-washed primaries. One really strange thing was that it stood in a completely different direction to the other terns (which were all facing into a light breeze). Pale rump showed well in flight, along with the diagnostic underwing pattern.

This location is about 15km away from Rauwai wharf where there was a Common Tern earlier in the Summer, but it is the same body of water.

cheers]]>

There was a Common Tern with about 1500 White-fronted Terns on the beach at Pouto - on North Head Kaipara Harbour, this afternoon.

Not quite in full breeding plumage, with some white still on the forehead, but no carpal bar showing, and lovely silver-washed primaries. One really strange thing was that it stood in a completely different direction to the other terns (which were all facing into a light breeze). Pale rump showed well in flight, along with the diagnostic underwing pattern.

This location is about 15km away from Rauwai wharf where there was a Common Tern earlier in the Summer, but it is the same body of water.

cheers]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lake Ellesmere, Canterbury March 31 2018 :: Reply by Steve Wratten]]> 2018-04-01T10:46:34+12:00 2018-04-01T10:46:34+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7582&p=36540#p36540 Jarvis Road was great: 8 Pacific golden Plovers (2 in ad. plumage), 150 Banded Dotterels, I NZ Pipit and 11 (eleven!) sharp-tailed sandpipers]]> Jarvis Road was great: 8 Pacific golden Plovers (2 in ad. plumage), 150 Banded Dotterels, I NZ Pipit and 11 (eleven!) sharp-tailed sandpipers]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Kawhia Harbour- Black Stilt & Bittern :: Author RussCannings]]> 2018-04-01T20:09:33+12:00 2018-04-01T20:09:33+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7670&p=36542#p36542
Lisa and I enjoyed a very pleasant day exploring the Kawhia Harbour area today. At high tide we strolled south down Ocean Beach to the mouth of the harbour where ~360 Banded Dots were roosting along with 7 NZ Dots. As the tide fell we skirted the north side of the harbour back east and lucked into a BITTERN hunting in a wet paddock beside the road not far from the Aotea turnoff. We then returned home to Cambridge via a long scenic route along the south side of the harbour, Te Anga, and Waitomo. The clear highlight along this route was an apparent BLACK STILT which we scoped out in the inlet mudflats near Kinohaku. After noting that there were 250+ Pieds present I commented to Lisa that, "This might be a good area to check for Black Stilts in winter." Well within about 20 seconds, in comes a black stilt! It was banded though unfortunately we couldn't get the combo due to backlighting. Will aim to post a photo once I get to my laptop.

Great day to be out and about.

Russ and Lisa C]]>

Lisa and I enjoyed a very pleasant day exploring the Kawhia Harbour area today. At high tide we strolled south down Ocean Beach to the mouth of the harbour where ~360 Banded Dots were roosting along with 7 NZ Dots. As the tide fell we skirted the north side of the harbour back east and lucked into a BITTERN hunting in a wet paddock beside the road not far from the Aotea turnoff. We then returned home to Cambridge via a long scenic route along the south side of the harbour, Te Anga, and Waitomo. The clear highlight along this route was an apparent BLACK STILT which we scoped out in the inlet mudflats near Kinohaku. After noting that there were 250+ Pieds present I commented to Lisa that, "This might be a good area to check for Black Stilts in winter." Well within about 20 seconds, in comes a black stilt! It was banded though unfortunately we couldn't get the combo due to backlighting. Will aim to post a photo once I get to my laptop.

Great day to be out and about.

Russ and Lisa C]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Three Royal spoonbills in Firth of Thames :: Author Clinton9]]> 2018-04-01T22:19:04+12:00 2018-04-01T22:19:04+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7671&p=36545#p36545
Spoonbills are on centre of this photo below blue patch.

20180331_182207.jpg

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Spoonbills are on centre of this photo below blue patch.

20180331_182207.jpg

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20180331_182207.jpg (141.89 KiB)


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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Four cattle egrets, south-east of Waitakaruru. :: Author Clinton9]]> 2018-04-01T22:29:48+12:00 2018-04-01T22:29:48+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7672&p=36546#p36546
I had photographed the egrets and I videoed the egrets, but sadly this website do not allow videos.

These egrets were 30 yards from me and are wary, then they took off and flew to drinking trough to drink.

20180401_161445.jpg

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I had photographed the egrets and I videoed the egrets, but sadly this website do not allow videos.

These egrets were 30 yards from me and are wary, then they took off and flew to drinking trough to drink.

20180401_161445.jpg

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20180401_161445.jpg (242.91 KiB)


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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Spotless crake & Banded rail - Tuff Crater, Auckland :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-04-01T23:40:47+12:00 2018-04-01T23:40:47+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7609&p=36547#p36547 Over the last week during high tide there has been a Banded dotterel flock on the grass at Warehouse Way nearby, varying from 10-15 birds.]]> Over the last week during high tide there has been a Banded dotterel flock on the grass at Warehouse Way nearby, varying from 10-15 birds.]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Ohiwa - update :: Author Tim Barnard]]> 2018-04-02T16:35:26+12:00 2018-04-02T16:35:26+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7676&p=36554#p36554 Tim]]> Tim]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Gull billed Tern - Motueka Spit. :: Author Steve Wood]]> 2018-04-02T18:37:47+12:00 2018-04-02T18:37:47+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7677&p=36555#p36555
Steve]]>

Steve]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Lake Ellesmere birding :: Author andrewcrossland]]> 2018-04-02T19:01:06+12:00 2018-04-02T19:01:06+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7678&p=36556#p36556 13 pacific golden plover
2 sharp-tailed sandpiper
1 godwit
2 red-necked stint.
This is the time of year (late feb to late April ) when all the good stuff turns up sp folks, keep your eyes open....]]>
13 pacific golden plover
2 sharp-tailed sandpiper
1 godwit
2 red-necked stint.
This is the time of year (late feb to late April ) when all the good stuff turns up sp folks, keep your eyes open....]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Petrel Dunedin :: Author Matthias]]> 2018-04-02T19:33:02+12:00 2018-04-03T09:21:14+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7680&p=36559#p36559 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Petrel Dunedin :: Reply by philbattley]]> 2018-04-02T20:00:09+12:00 2018-04-02T20:00:09+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7680&p=36561#p36561 Cheers, Phi]]> Cheers, Phi]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Petrel Dunedin :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-04-03T13:30:15+12:00 2018-04-03T13:30:15+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7680&p=36573#p36573 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Petrel Dunedin :: Reply by George Hobson]]> 2018-04-03T14:04:29+12:00 2018-04-03T14:04:29+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7680&p=36574#p36574
philbattley wrote:Hi Matthias, left-field suggestion is Black-fronted Tern. I think the white rump and contrasting light and dark around the face would fit.
Cheers, Phi

Picture seems to be gone, but from when I saw it last night, I'd agree with you on Black-fronted Tern.]]>
philbattley wrote:Hi Matthias, left-field suggestion is Black-fronted Tern. I think the white rump and contrasting light and dark around the face would fit.
Cheers, Phi

Picture seems to be gone, but from when I saw it last night, I'd agree with you on Black-fronted Tern.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Pink-footed Shearwater at Kaikoura :: Reply by Matthias]]> 2018-04-02T20:18:14+12:00 2018-04-03T09:20:19+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7565&p=36562#p36562 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Pink-footed Shearwater at Kaikoura :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-04-03T07:10:36+12:00 2018-04-03T18:36:20+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7565&p=36566#p36566 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Pink-footed Shearwater at Kaikoura :: Reply by erikforsyth]]> 2018-04-03T11:47:41+12:00 2018-04-03T11:47:41+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7565&p=36572#p36572
here is the bird from Kaikoura taken 13th February 2018 by Matt Anderson and my strange bird from the Hauraki Gulf in October 2017 below.

cheers
Erik Forsyth
Rockjumper Birding Tours
http://www.rockjumperbirding.com

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Shearwater species Hauraki Gulf
IMG_4862.JPG (196.94 KiB)
Shearwater species Hauraki Gulf

Pink-footed Shearwater Kaikoura
27750647_1657992367572667_7080916015851752196_n.jpg (58.77 KiB)
Pink-footed Shearwater Kaikoura

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here is the bird from Kaikoura taken 13th February 2018 by Matt Anderson and my strange bird from the Hauraki Gulf in October 2017 below.

cheers
Erik Forsyth
Rockjumper Birding Tours
http://www.rockjumperbirding.com

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Shearwater species Hauraki Gulf
IMG_4862.JPG (196.94 KiB)
Shearwater species Hauraki Gulf

Pink-footed Shearwater Kaikoura
27750647_1657992367572667_7080916015851752196_n.jpg (58.77 KiB)
Pink-footed Shearwater Kaikoura

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Pink-footed Shearwater at Kaikoura :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-04-03T16:45:15+12:00 2018-04-03T16:45:15+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7565&p=36575#p36575 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: stonking good day at L Ellesmere this arvo :: Author andrewcrossland]]> 2018-04-04T19:30:30+12:00 2018-04-04T19:30:30+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7685&p=36589#p36589
There's been a big influx of Red-necked Stints at Jarvis Road and now the full summer flock has revealed that every bird is still here - many of which were showing partial or full breeding plumage).

Birds at Jarvis Rd today were:

57 Red-necked Stint
710 Banded Dotterel
150+ Wrybill
400+ Pied Stilt
4 Pacific Golden Plover
2 Curlew Sandpiper (1 in good breeding plumage)
3 Sharp-tailed sandpiper
2 Bar-tailed Godwit

Over in the section between the Selwyn rivermouth and the LII rivermouth water levels were high, but interesting birds included:

1 Gull-billed Tern
11 Mute Swan
46 Royal Spoonbill
and these 3 Cape Barren Geese - good candidates for wild birds as they were flushed alongside other waterfowl by a passing Harrier and flew a good 1.5 km out over the lake and back to land well away from where they'd been. (Captive escapes tend more often to stand and look, then waddle around).
CB Goose 1.jpg


GB Tern.jpg

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CB Goose 1.jpg (103.78 KiB)


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There's been a big influx of Red-necked Stints at Jarvis Road and now the full summer flock has revealed that every bird is still here - many of which were showing partial or full breeding plumage).

Birds at Jarvis Rd today were:

57 Red-necked Stint
710 Banded Dotterel
150+ Wrybill
400+ Pied Stilt
4 Pacific Golden Plover
2 Curlew Sandpiper (1 in good breeding plumage)
3 Sharp-tailed sandpiper
2 Bar-tailed Godwit

Over in the section between the Selwyn rivermouth and the LII rivermouth water levels were high, but interesting birds included:

1 Gull-billed Tern
11 Mute Swan
46 Royal Spoonbill
and these 3 Cape Barren Geese - good candidates for wild birds as they were flushed alongside other waterfowl by a passing Harrier and flew a good 1.5 km out over the lake and back to land well away from where they'd been. (Captive escapes tend more often to stand and look, then waddle around).
CB Goose 1.jpg


GB Tern.jpg

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GB Tern.jpg (143.26 KiB)



CB Goose 1.jpg (103.78 KiB)


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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: New breeding species for New Zealand - Leach's Storm Petrel :: Reply by Colin Miskelly]]> 2018-04-05T19:43:19+12:00 2018-04-05T19:43:19+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7577&p=36598#p36598
The nest site was checked the day after we arrived (7 March) and found to contain a pair of broad-billed prions with no sign of a storm petrel egg or chick. Once the prions were removed, I found the desiccated remains of a banded Leach's storm petrel incorporated in the nest lining.

A barricade intended to exclude larger species but let storm petrels in was fitted to the entrance tunnel (Novacoil) a few days later, with an internal stick fence to detect any birds entering the burrow. The fence had not been disturbed at the last check 3 weeks later.

Play-back of Leach's storm petrel calls near the nest site and at rock tumbles within 100 m of the site on several fine nights failed to elicit a response.

And so the status of Leach's storm petrel as a breeding species in New Zealand is back to square zero.

Cheers
Colin]]>

The nest site was checked the day after we arrived (7 March) and found to contain a pair of broad-billed prions with no sign of a storm petrel egg or chick. Once the prions were removed, I found the desiccated remains of a banded Leach's storm petrel incorporated in the nest lining.

A barricade intended to exclude larger species but let storm petrels in was fitted to the entrance tunnel (Novacoil) a few days later, with an internal stick fence to detect any birds entering the burrow. The fence had not been disturbed at the last check 3 weeks later.

Play-back of Leach's storm petrel calls near the nest site and at rock tumbles within 100 m of the site on several fine nights failed to elicit a response.

And so the status of Leach's storm petrel as a breeding species in New Zealand is back to square zero.

Cheers
Colin]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-03-22T19:41:50+13:00 2018-03-22T19:41:50+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36463#p36463 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-03-23T19:40:44+13:00 2018-03-23T19:40:44+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36469#p36469 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Chris Bindon]]> 2018-03-26T11:47:50+13:00 2018-03-26T11:47:50+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36489#p36489
Does this seem a reasonable scenario? If so, how could this be organised, maybe via one of the Naval vessels that carry DOC staff etc?

Many thanks,

Chris]]>

Does this seem a reasonable scenario? If so, how could this be organised, maybe via one of the Naval vessels that carry DOC staff etc?

Many thanks,

Chris]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-03-26T14:05:22+13:00 2018-03-26T14:05:22+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36490#p36490
Very concerned to see the suggestions on the Forum from Chris Bindon.

There is no good reason to transport the Frigate anywhere. Doing-so would result in it's disorientation when turned-out in a different location to where it landed, especially on the opposite coast to where it thinks it is located.

Moving the bird would stress it and probably result in it flying off in the wrong direction to it's death. It should be taken back to Muriwai where it was found, a nice short distance away.

We've witnessed the tragic outcomes of previous misguided 'repatriations' of rare species like this before. 'Happy Feet' the Emperor Penguin is a recent example, and so are both of the UK Frigates that were 'helped' back to where the rescuers assumed they'd originated from, only to perish because the birds were totally lost and confused when released somewhere unfamiliar.

Not only is Muriwai close to the centre and on the correct coast, it offers suitable perches for this tree-landing avian species and an immediate food source amongst the local ternery.

Keep it simple and the right thing for the birds, please. Just do the right thing and let nature take it's course.]]>

Very concerned to see the suggestions on the Forum from Chris Bindon.

There is no good reason to transport the Frigate anywhere. Doing-so would result in it's disorientation when turned-out in a different location to where it landed, especially on the opposite coast to where it thinks it is located.

Moving the bird would stress it and probably result in it flying off in the wrong direction to it's death. It should be taken back to Muriwai where it was found, a nice short distance away.

We've witnessed the tragic outcomes of previous misguided 'repatriations' of rare species like this before. 'Happy Feet' the Emperor Penguin is a recent example, and so are both of the UK Frigates that were 'helped' back to where the rescuers assumed they'd originated from, only to perish because the birds were totally lost and confused when released somewhere unfamiliar.

Not only is Muriwai close to the centre and on the correct coast, it offers suitable perches for this tree-landing avian species and an immediate food source amongst the local ternery.

Keep it simple and the right thing for the birds, please. Just do the right thing and let nature take it's course.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Chris Bindon]]> 2018-03-26T14:44:15+13:00 2018-03-26T14:44:15+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36491#p36491
Many thanks,

Chris]]>

Many thanks,

Chris]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-04-03T18:01:12+12:00 2018-04-03T18:01:12+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36576#p36576
Just reporting that the bird was released successfully today from the Muriwai Gannet Colony. It immediately took off and after a bit of trouble from the gulls, circled high into the sky. I was lucky enough to be invited as the photographer (which will come later) but a big effort was made by the centre to keep the event under wraps. Apologies to all those who wanted to view the release, and hopefully if history repeats itself they will be a bit more open to spectators.]]>

Just reporting that the bird was released successfully today from the Muriwai Gannet Colony. It immediately took off and after a bit of trouble from the gulls, circled high into the sky. I was lucky enough to be invited as the photographer (which will come later) but a big effort was made by the centre to keep the event under wraps. Apologies to all those who wanted to view the release, and hopefully if history repeats itself they will be a bit more open to spectators.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-04-03T18:35:04+12:00 2018-04-03T18:35:04+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36577#p36577
Paul has asked me to post this email from.

Well, in New Zealand birding, things quite often happen that shake you to your foundations
and make you question your own faith in people, and the mad, mad place we live.
Today was the ‘stand-out’ occasion in 45 years of birding for me, in that respect.

On receipt of my email, Green Bay Bird Rescue Centre finally accepted that the Lesser Frigate
was wasting-away due to mis-handling, and being kept so long. (not to mention the excessive
examinations, photographing, and drawing of extreme quantities of blood as shown on Facebook!).

They were hanging onto it because they mistakenly thought it still had to re-gain waterproofing
in it’s plumage (Frigates don’t have waterproof plumage!!), and they needed a prevailing wind
to take it north. It was no longer thriving, and with muscular degeneration from it’s extended
confinement, I informed them, it’s chances of survival were falling day-by-day.

In addition to pleading with them to inform me so we could observe the release from a distance with
binoculars, I personally pledged a couple of hundred dollars donation to bird welfare funds.

I provided them with weather maps for today, and documents about the plumage issue to urge
consideration of immediate release on welfare grounds.

So today they released it at Muriwai, in exactly the place and time I’d suggested…. but with one difference:

They specifically withheld this information from those who had requested (nee, pleaded) to be there!!

Fully aware of the critical desire of three or four dedicated birders to watch from a distance, they
deliberately withheld the news and set off in secret despite having my full contact details.

The bird was released in full public gaze next to the busy Muriwai Gannet Colony viewing platform,
and placed on the branch where the Red-Footed Booby was enjoyed by so many of us last year.

They even took along a film crew from TVNZ ‘Seven Sharp’!! Non-birders standing-about everywhere!

Far from this being an issue of welfare of the bird, the exclusion of those of us to whom this was a
once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, was an act of such maliciousness and bad faith, that I was moved to tears.

In order to deceive birders, they were prepared to fore-go hundreds, perhaps thousands of dollars
in gratefully-given donations that would have benefitted birds in future.

There’s no mistake here. This was a deliberate act of extreme malice and spite directed against
birders. It came as no surprise to those who’ve been following this bird’s progress for the last month.

The Centre’s staff have been surly, unhelpful and downright hostile at all times, refusing all attempts
to offer vital advice or in fact, even engage in a polite or positive conversation with anyone identified
as a birder. To quote Sav….” WHY???”

I can’t answer Sav’s question. It’s a mystery why birders, and twitchers in particular, are so reviled and
discriminated-against in New Zealand….to the point of others harming birds rather than address a birder.

We were at Miranda when the Centre let slip that their team had left the building and set off for Muriwai.

A two-hour dash through the Auckland traffic saw us arrive 90 minutes too late.

The bird had sat for thirty seconds on the release branch then flown high and straight, away to the south
where is was lost as a tiny black dot in the distance at high altitude.

It’s all over for birders. And to quote Sav again…”WHY???”.

You can see it on ‘Seven Sharp’ tonight or on Weds. In fact anyone who was standing-around on the
public viewing platform could have seen it. And so could any Tom, Dick, or Harry.
…..so long as they weren’t a birder.

Nasty. Very nasty.]]>

Paul has asked me to post this email from.

Well, in New Zealand birding, things quite often happen that shake you to your foundations
and make you question your own faith in people, and the mad, mad place we live.
Today was the ‘stand-out’ occasion in 45 years of birding for me, in that respect.

On receipt of my email, Green Bay Bird Rescue Centre finally accepted that the Lesser Frigate
was wasting-away due to mis-handling, and being kept so long. (not to mention the excessive
examinations, photographing, and drawing of extreme quantities of blood as shown on Facebook!).

They were hanging onto it because they mistakenly thought it still had to re-gain waterproofing
in it’s plumage (Frigates don’t have waterproof plumage!!), and they needed a prevailing wind
to take it north. It was no longer thriving, and with muscular degeneration from it’s extended
confinement, I informed them, it’s chances of survival were falling day-by-day.

In addition to pleading with them to inform me so we could observe the release from a distance with
binoculars, I personally pledged a couple of hundred dollars donation to bird welfare funds.

I provided them with weather maps for today, and documents about the plumage issue to urge
consideration of immediate release on welfare grounds.

So today they released it at Muriwai, in exactly the place and time I’d suggested…. but with one difference:

They specifically withheld this information from those who had requested (nee, pleaded) to be there!!

Fully aware of the critical desire of three or four dedicated birders to watch from a distance, they
deliberately withheld the news and set off in secret despite having my full contact details.

The bird was released in full public gaze next to the busy Muriwai Gannet Colony viewing platform,
and placed on the branch where the Red-Footed Booby was enjoyed by so many of us last year.

They even took along a film crew from TVNZ ‘Seven Sharp’!! Non-birders standing-about everywhere!

Far from this being an issue of welfare of the bird, the exclusion of those of us to whom this was a
once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, was an act of such maliciousness and bad faith, that I was moved to tears.

In order to deceive birders, they were prepared to fore-go hundreds, perhaps thousands of dollars
in gratefully-given donations that would have benefitted birds in future.

There’s no mistake here. This was a deliberate act of extreme malice and spite directed against
birders. It came as no surprise to those who’ve been following this bird’s progress for the last month.

The Centre’s staff have been surly, unhelpful and downright hostile at all times, refusing all attempts
to offer vital advice or in fact, even engage in a polite or positive conversation with anyone identified
as a birder. To quote Sav….” WHY???”

I can’t answer Sav’s question. It’s a mystery why birders, and twitchers in particular, are so reviled and
discriminated-against in New Zealand….to the point of others harming birds rather than address a birder.

We were at Miranda when the Centre let slip that their team had left the building and set off for Muriwai.

A two-hour dash through the Auckland traffic saw us arrive 90 minutes too late.

The bird had sat for thirty seconds on the release branch then flown high and straight, away to the south
where is was lost as a tiny black dot in the distance at high altitude.

It’s all over for birders. And to quote Sav again…”WHY???”.

You can see it on ‘Seven Sharp’ tonight or on Weds. In fact anyone who was standing-around on the
public viewing platform could have seen it. And so could any Tom, Dick, or Harry.
…..so long as they weren’t a birder.

Nasty. Very nasty.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-04-03T19:02:42+12:00 2018-04-03T19:02:42+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36578#p36578 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-04-03T20:54:53+12:00 2018-04-04T21:40:54+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36579#p36579 The birders who tried so hard to find an opportunity to see it are people that care a great deal about this bird and in no way want it to come to any harm. They are not part of the touchy feely brigade. They don't want to cuddle it, put it in a box and show it off as some kind of rescued damsel in distress avian trophy on social media. They, I assume, are also not part of the "we must document everything brigade" and desire everyone else to step aside while they take 110 photos of every possible angle. I suggest that these birders would be far more sensitive to the bird's fears and anxiety than all the joe public onlookers, media stars, and officiendos
I'm not sure that NZers have a prejudice against twitchers. Does the prejudice perhaps have its source in the influential non-birding ex-pat Brit community in NZ? Have they imported a mindset based on urban legends of the ugly twitcher?
Anyway final thought. I do hope those birders who did in fact get to see this frigatebird released did their best to have their excluded comrades included? I think if it were me I'd feel a duty to try and make peace between the groups and try to bring some inclusiveness. Because after all every birder there (whether on the invite list or not) was essentially into twitching this bird, right?]]>
The birders who tried so hard to find an opportunity to see it are people that care a great deal about this bird and in no way want it to come to any harm. They are not part of the touchy feely brigade. They don't want to cuddle it, put it in a box and show it off as some kind of rescued damsel in distress avian trophy on social media. They, I assume, are also not part of the "we must document everything brigade" and desire everyone else to step aside while they take 110 photos of every possible angle. I suggest that these birders would be far more sensitive to the bird's fears and anxiety than all the joe public onlookers, media stars, and officiendos
I'm not sure that NZers have a prejudice against twitchers. Does the prejudice perhaps have its source in the influential non-birding ex-pat Brit community in NZ? Have they imported a mindset based on urban legends of the ugly twitcher?
Anyway final thought. I do hope those birders who did in fact get to see this frigatebird released did their best to have their excluded comrades included? I think if it were me I'd feel a duty to try and make peace between the groups and try to bring some inclusiveness. Because after all every birder there (whether on the invite list or not) was essentially into twitching this bird, right?]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-04-03T21:18:33+12:00 2018-04-03T21:18:33+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36580#p36580 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Steve Wood]]> 2018-04-03T21:35:50+12:00 2018-04-03T21:35:50+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36581#p36581
I have to say, I do agree with Paul: it does defy belief why the rescue centre have been so secretive and anti and totally unwilling to have any interested people attending the release.
I can't work out what logical reason they would have had not to include the few keen people that had shown serious interest, even at the early stages.... With people even donating money it surely it would have been a win win all round?

Seeing now that they let it go at a public sight anyway, it is a complete enigma to me why the Rescue Centre couldn’t grant our birders the option of attending the release of the frigate bird by notifying someone, but they could invite Seven Sharp and had no worries about any ‘Joe’ public being there.

I’m very disappointed at the decision of the Rescue Centre and it has also been very worrying to read Paul’s words about the deteriorating health status of the bird, caused by possible mishandling and lack of knowledge.

Very disappointing attitude by the Rescue Centre overall.

Steve]]>

I have to say, I do agree with Paul: it does defy belief why the rescue centre have been so secretive and anti and totally unwilling to have any interested people attending the release.
I can't work out what logical reason they would have had not to include the few keen people that had shown serious interest, even at the early stages.... With people even donating money it surely it would have been a win win all round?

Seeing now that they let it go at a public sight anyway, it is a complete enigma to me why the Rescue Centre couldn’t grant our birders the option of attending the release of the frigate bird by notifying someone, but they could invite Seven Sharp and had no worries about any ‘Joe’ public being there.

I’m very disappointed at the decision of the Rescue Centre and it has also been very worrying to read Paul’s words about the deteriorating health status of the bird, caused by possible mishandling and lack of knowledge.

Very disappointing attitude by the Rescue Centre overall.

Steve]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-04-03T22:06:34+12:00 2018-04-03T22:06:34+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36582#p36582 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Ian McLean]]> 2018-04-04T12:52:12+12:00 2018-04-04T12:52:12+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36586#p36586 In regard to the Frigatebird & the NZ Bird Rescue Charitable Trust in Green Bay, can people please refrain from sending them any direct criticism over this episode. The reason I ask is that as the Auckland Regional Representative from Birds New Zealand I am currently trying to build some bridges with them in order to have a mutually beneficial relationship that will benefit both birders, the volunteers & the birds !
There appears to be some previous history that has soured things a bit, I am not familiar with any episode but it is likely to have been a personality clash between cantankerous individuals from a long time ago that has been responsible.
My hope is that a relationship will be developed that will allow for more openness, less secrecy & greater co-operation. If relations were to be soured further, it could mean that rarities taken there by the public go completely unrecorded & that would be most regrettable from both a birding interest & a scientific point of view.
Cheers
Ian McLean
Auckland Regional Representative
Birds New Zealand]]>
In regard to the Frigatebird & the NZ Bird Rescue Charitable Trust in Green Bay, can people please refrain from sending them any direct criticism over this episode. The reason I ask is that as the Auckland Regional Representative from Birds New Zealand I am currently trying to build some bridges with them in order to have a mutually beneficial relationship that will benefit both birders, the volunteers & the birds !
There appears to be some previous history that has soured things a bit, I am not familiar with any episode but it is likely to have been a personality clash between cantankerous individuals from a long time ago that has been responsible.
My hope is that a relationship will be developed that will allow for more openness, less secrecy & greater co-operation. If relations were to be soured further, it could mean that rarities taken there by the public go completely unrecorded & that would be most regrettable from both a birding interest & a scientific point of view.
Cheers
Ian McLean
Auckland Regional Representative
Birds New Zealand]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by sav]]> 2018-04-04T19:02:01+12:00 2018-04-04T19:02:01+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36587#p36587
Oscar Thomas wrote:No birders were present apart from me, but the bird rescue asked me to be present for photographs. I was only told it was going to be released an hour prior so couldn’t exactly get the word out, and was strictly instructed not to share any information about it.


Hi Oscar,

Did they explain WHY you were not allowed to share the information? If they didn't, would you be able to ask the question? I guess that Ian's request means that none of us wicked twitchers are able to.

It beggars belief that a charity has so much money that donations of several hundred dollars can be turned down in the way that they did.

And BTW if anyone asks you to suppress information about a rarity in the future, my advise would be to ignore the instruction - "publish and be damned!!" (Ask anyone that was birding in the UK in the early 1980s if the name Barry Spence rings any bells!!).

And I guess your latest lifer ought to be Lesser Frigatebird...........

cheers,]]>
Oscar Thomas wrote:No birders were present apart from me, but the bird rescue asked me to be present for photographs. I was only told it was going to be released an hour prior so couldn’t exactly get the word out, and was strictly instructed not to share any information about it.


Hi Oscar,

Did they explain WHY you were not allowed to share the information? If they didn't, would you be able to ask the question? I guess that Ian's request means that none of us wicked twitchers are able to.

It beggars belief that a charity has so much money that donations of several hundred dollars can be turned down in the way that they did.

And BTW if anyone asks you to suppress information about a rarity in the future, my advise would be to ignore the instruction - "publish and be damned!!" (Ask anyone that was birding in the UK in the early 1980s if the name Barry Spence rings any bells!!).

And I guess your latest lifer ought to be Lesser Frigatebird...........

cheers,]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-04-04T19:28:04+12:00 2018-04-04T19:28:04+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36588#p36588
And I guess your latest lifer ought to be Lesser Frigatebird...........


Not wanting to beat up this topic too much more--but out of interest--does NZ accept captive-released birds as wild and countable on one's list? I would have thought you'd have to wait a little longer but maybe not?]]>
And I guess your latest lifer ought to be Lesser Frigatebird...........


Not wanting to beat up this topic too much more--but out of interest--does NZ accept captive-released birds as wild and countable on one's list? I would have thought you'd have to wait a little longer but maybe not?]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Steve Wood]]> 2018-04-04T20:04:42+12:00 2018-04-04T20:04:42+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36590#p36590 Not sure exactly if there are any rules of engagement for NZ. We very rarely get the chance to benefit from a "bonus" bird as you are aware.
But I guess it boils down to how much of a purist you are. It was a wild bird and went back into the wild albeit a little tainted you might say... (AC!)
Personally if I had the opportunity, I would have gone to the release site, and if it flew of, fit and well, as it did, I would have claimed it.
Don't forget all those translocated birds spread all around the offshore Islands.... not a great deal of difference and manhandled at some point.
Or Penguins that have been shifted from one beach to another.... would you still count that?... probably yup.
If it was a lifer that might be a different story??
And for those wondering if I claimed the Kerguelen Pet a year or so back. I was privileged to see one released but the bird was not up to it and was recaptured and subsequently died shortly after. No, still waiting for a real one.]]>
Not sure exactly if there are any rules of engagement for NZ. We very rarely get the chance to benefit from a "bonus" bird as you are aware.
But I guess it boils down to how much of a purist you are. It was a wild bird and went back into the wild albeit a little tainted you might say... (AC!)
Personally if I had the opportunity, I would have gone to the release site, and if it flew of, fit and well, as it did, I would have claimed it.
Don't forget all those translocated birds spread all around the offshore Islands.... not a great deal of difference and manhandled at some point.
Or Penguins that have been shifted from one beach to another.... would you still count that?... probably yup.
If it was a lifer that might be a different story??
And for those wondering if I claimed the Kerguelen Pet a year or so back. I was privileged to see one released but the bird was not up to it and was recaptured and subsequently died shortly after. No, still waiting for a real one.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by sav]]> 2018-04-04T20:17:04+12:00 2018-04-04T20:17:04+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36591#p36591
RussCannings wrote:
And I guess your latest lifer ought to be Lesser Frigatebird...........


Not wanting to beat up this topic too much more--but out of interest--does NZ accept captive-released birds as wild and countable on one's list? I would have thought you'd have to wait a little longer but maybe not?


Hey Russ,

Like many other things in birding, there isn't a "NZ Standard" for this, nor anywhere else I guess. I know that lots of UK birders will go for a released bird, but it really is a matter of personal choice, and I'll go on the record to say that I wouldn't do it myself. (Unless it was something really, really cool of course!)

cheers]]>
RussCannings wrote:
And I guess your latest lifer ought to be Lesser Frigatebird...........


Not wanting to beat up this topic too much more--but out of interest--does NZ accept captive-released birds as wild and countable on one's list? I would have thought you'd have to wait a little longer but maybe not?


Hey Russ,

Like many other things in birding, there isn't a "NZ Standard" for this, nor anywhere else I guess. I know that lots of UK birders will go for a released bird, but it really is a matter of personal choice, and I'll go on the record to say that I wouldn't do it myself. (Unless it was something really, really cool of course!)

cheers]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-04-04T21:38:49+12:00 2018-04-04T21:38:49+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36592#p36592 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-04-05T06:54:26+12:00 2018-04-05T06:54:26+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36593#p36593
In general though I'd probably ere on the ABA side of things (my usual bias) of waiting 24 hours after release. To me that's a key difference between a frigatebird flying away from a box and a stitchbird that has settled into it's new island home. We don't have this problem here but I have heard of mistnet banders/ringers in Europe keeping healthy vagrants in bags over night to give twitchers a chance to drive down and see the release.

More importantly though, I hope we do find a way to develop a more open and trusting relationship with care facilities and other auxiliary wildlife organisations in NZ.

Ta
Russ]]>

In general though I'd probably ere on the ABA side of things (my usual bias) of waiting 24 hours after release. To me that's a key difference between a frigatebird flying away from a box and a stitchbird that has settled into it's new island home. We don't have this problem here but I have heard of mistnet banders/ringers in Europe keeping healthy vagrants in bags over night to give twitchers a chance to drive down and see the release.

More importantly though, I hope we do find a way to develop a more open and trusting relationship with care facilities and other auxiliary wildlife organisations in NZ.

Ta
Russ]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Steve Wood]]> 2018-04-05T11:56:01+12:00 2018-04-05T11:56:01+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36594#p36594
Do you think we would be able to see any of the images from the release ? or is that going to antagonize some people.

thanks
Steve]]>

Do you think we would be able to see any of the images from the release ? or is that going to antagonize some people.

thanks
Steve]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-04-05T12:14:01+12:00 2018-04-05T12:14:01+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36595#p36595

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-04-05T14:42:02+12:00 2018-04-05T14:42:02+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36596#p36596
Grahame]]>

Grahame]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Steve Wood]]> 2018-04-05T17:06:36+12:00 2018-04-05T17:06:36+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36597#p36597
Steve]]>

Steve]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-04-06T19:30:37+12:00 2018-04-06T19:30:37+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36609#p36609 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-04-06T19:54:47+12:00 2018-04-06T19:54:47+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36613#p36613 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-04-06T19:57:02+12:00 2018-04-06T19:57:02+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36614#p36614 https://www.tvnz.co.nz/shows/seven-shar ... rigatebird]]> https://www.tvnz.co.nz/shows/seven-shar ... rigatebird]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Frigatebird in care in Auckland :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-04-06T20:04:05+12:00 2018-04-06T20:04:05+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7628&p=36615#p36615
It's a nice bird ... would be great if one turns up in future and stays around for a bit.
You never know. We've had some interesting weather patterns this summer. I'm sure they will be repeated.
Cheers
Tim]]>

It's a nice bird ... would be great if one turns up in future and stays around for a bit.
You never know. We've had some interesting weather patterns this summer. I'm sure they will be repeated.
Cheers
Tim]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Glossy ibis :: Reply by Will Parsons]]> 2018-03-28T09:52:11+13:00 2018-03-28T09:52:11+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4072&p=36507#p36507 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Glossy ibis :: Reply by Paul Gibson]]> 2018-03-28T15:32:42+13:00 2018-03-28T15:32:42+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4072&p=36509#p36509 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Glossy ibis :: Reply by GKincaid]]> 2018-03-28T19:00:10+13:00 2018-03-28T19:00:10+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4072&p=36511#p36511 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Glossy ibis :: Reply by boneywhitefoot]]> 2018-03-28T22:18:58+13:00 2018-03-28T22:18:58+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4072&p=36512#p36512 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Glossy ibis :: Reply by Will Parsons]]> 2018-03-30T22:07:17+13:00 2018-03-30T22:07:17+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4072&p=36528#p36528 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Glossy ibis :: Reply by GKincaid]]> 2018-04-02T11:44:40+12:00 2018-04-02T11:44:40+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4072&p=36550#p36550 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Glossy ibis :: Reply by imogen]]> 2018-04-07T18:03:02+12:00 2018-04-07T18:03:02+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4072&p=36618#p36618 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: White variable oyster catcher - not Blanche :: Reply by jdowding]]> 2018-04-07T21:22:47+12:00 2018-04-07T21:22:47+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7453&p=36621#p36621 I think I may have found your bird. On 06 April, there was a flock of about 35 VOC on the lawn at Orapiu Lodge. As the tide dropped, they gradually wandered out onto the beach and started to feed - all very slow and relaxed. Among them was this one. After a while, a group of them (including this one) flew around the point towards Te Matuku.

John

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I think I may have found your bird. On 06 April, there was a flock of about 35 VOC on the lawn at Orapiu Lodge. As the tide dropped, they gradually wandered out onto the beach and started to feed - all very slow and relaxed. Among them was this one. After a while, a group of them (including this one) flew around the point towards Te Matuku.

John

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Bittern - at last! :: Author GrahamB]]> 2018-03-29T09:37:43+13:00 2018-03-29T09:37:43+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7664&p=36515#p36515 Sad really.]]> Sad really.]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Bittern - at last! :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-03-29T11:13:02+13:00 2018-03-29T11:13:02+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7664&p=36518#p36518 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Bittern - at last! :: Reply by zarkov]]> 2018-03-29T20:06:51+13:00 2018-03-29T20:06:51+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7664&p=36522#p36522
Same with lots of things I guess, it's certainly true of trout.]]>

Same with lots of things I guess, it's certainly true of trout.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Bittern - at last! :: Reply by Will Parsons]]> 2018-03-30T22:10:01+13:00 2018-03-30T22:10:01+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7664&p=36529#p36529 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Bittern - at last! :: Reply by boneywhitefoot]]> 2018-03-31T19:59:53+13:00 2018-03-31T19:59:53+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7664&p=36538#p36538 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Bittern - at last! :: Reply by Will Parsons]]> 2018-04-08T17:13:40+12:00 2018-04-08T17:13:40+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7664&p=36631#p36631 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Manawatu Estuary terns :: Reply by imogen]]> 2018-04-07T18:05:35+12:00 2018-04-07T18:05:35+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7580&p=36619#p36619
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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Manawatu Estuary terns :: Reply by philbattley]]> 2018-04-08T19:46:55+12:00 2018-04-08T19:46:55+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7580&p=36632#p36632 Phil]]> Phil]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Anyone count wrybill at ki-wainono in spring 2013? :: Author andrewcrossland]]> 2018-04-09T17:02:50+12:00 2018-04-09T17:02:50+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7692&p=36647#p36647 Thanks]]> Thanks]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Terns :: Author Pistolero1920]]> 2018-04-08T08:40:14+12:00 2018-04-08T08:40:14+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7687&p=36623#p36623 Can you advise if there are any other pure white, black eyed, black beaked birds I might be mistaking these for?
cheers.
ps, I'm new to bird watching.]]>
Can you advise if there are any other pure white, black eyed, black beaked birds I might be mistaking these for?
cheers.
ps, I'm new to bird watching.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Terns :: Reply by George Hobson]]> 2018-04-08T09:34:04+12:00 2018-04-08T09:34:04+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7687&p=36624#p36624 If you're not sure how to, there's a guide in the help section, or you're welcome to email them to me and I can do it :)
White Tern is unlikely as they're a very rare tropical seabird, is Black-billed gull a possibility?]]>
If you're not sure how to, there's a guide in the help section, or you're welcome to email them to me and I can do it :)
White Tern is unlikely as they're a very rare tropical seabird, is Black-billed gull a possibility?]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Terns :: Reply by tim]]> 2018-04-08T13:29:47+12:00 2018-04-08T13:29:47+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7687&p=36628#p36628 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Terns :: Reply by Pistolero1920]]> 2018-04-09T09:30:28+12:00 2018-04-09T09:30:28+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7687&p=36636#p36636 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Terns :: Reply by nzsam]]> 2018-04-09T18:15:12+12:00 2018-04-09T18:15:12+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7687&p=36648#p36648
Pistolero1920 wrote:Definitely not a black billed gull, we have plenty of those here. Where do I find the help section, to find out how to post photos?


Try this link - viewtopic.php?f=5&t=5744]]>
Pistolero1920 wrote:Definitely not a black billed gull, we have plenty of those here. Where do I find the help section, to find out how to post photos?


Try this link - viewtopic.php?f=5&t=5744]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Fernbird, Waitangi Hawkes Bay :: Author tim]]> 2018-04-08T12:52:15+12:00 2018-04-08T12:52:15+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7689&p=36626#p36626 It wasn't there yesterday but it was a very nice surprise this morning and possible first fernbird at this site ever!
I am not sure if it is going to stick around but good to see one crossing lots of farmland to get to this wetland.]]>
It wasn't there yesterday but it was a very nice surprise this morning and possible first fernbird at this site ever!
I am not sure if it is going to stick around but good to see one crossing lots of farmland to get to this wetland.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Fernbird, Waitangi Hawkes Bay :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-04-09T06:48:20+12:00 2018-04-09T06:48:20+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7689&p=36635#p36635 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Fernbird, Waitangi Hawkes Bay :: Reply by tim]]> 2018-04-09T13:55:09+12:00 2018-04-09T13:55:09+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7689&p=36641#p36641 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Fernbird, Waitangi Hawkes Bay :: Reply by Michael Szabo]]> 2018-04-09T14:25:03+12:00 2018-04-09T14:25:03+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7689&p=36642#p36642 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Fernbird, Waitangi Hawkes Bay :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-04-10T07:00:34+12:00 2018-04-10T07:00:34+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7689&p=36653#p36653
Russ C]]>

Russ C]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Cool Strait Ferry Crossing :: Author Davidthomas]]> 2018-04-10T13:44:04+12:00 2018-04-10T13:44:04+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7693&p=36654#p36654
1 BROWN SKUA
2 Grey backed storm petrel
1 Northern Royal Albatross
1 Juvenile Campbell/Black-Browed Albatross (didn’t see underwing)
15+ NZ White-Capped Albatross
15+ Cape Petrels (I didn’t see anything but snares sub spp.)
2 short tailed shearwater
1 sooty shearwater (showing white wingflashes)
5+ Westland/White-Chinned Petrels
20+ Bullers Shearwaters
100+ Fluttering Shearwaters
5+ Huttons Shearwaters
100+ Fairy Prion
1 Possible Broad-billed prion
1 possible soft plumage petrel
20+ Common Diving Petrel

Just inside the sounds there was a large mixed flock of terns, with atleast 10 Black-Fronted terns, and a single Arctic Skua, and quite a few gulls.

Worth getting out for a sea watch if you’re in the Wellington area over the next two days I’d say! Cape Palliser would be pumping today, with surprisingly good visibility considering the storm.

David

Edit:

Did a quick seawatch from Kaikoura in a break in the weather, and it was rather quiet considering. A single Large Procellaria petrel was seen and some fluttons l and that was it in 5 minutes, so decided I’d rather be warm!

A few turnstones, banded Dotterels and oystercatchers on the rocky platforms at the peninsular carpark among the gulls seals and whitefaced herons.]]>

1 BROWN SKUA
2 Grey backed storm petrel
1 Northern Royal Albatross
1 Juvenile Campbell/Black-Browed Albatross (didn’t see underwing)
15+ NZ White-Capped Albatross
15+ Cape Petrels (I didn’t see anything but snares sub spp.)
2 short tailed shearwater
1 sooty shearwater (showing white wingflashes)
5+ Westland/White-Chinned Petrels
20+ Bullers Shearwaters
100+ Fluttering Shearwaters
5+ Huttons Shearwaters
100+ Fairy Prion
1 Possible Broad-billed prion
1 possible soft plumage petrel
20+ Common Diving Petrel

Just inside the sounds there was a large mixed flock of terns, with atleast 10 Black-Fronted terns, and a single Arctic Skua, and quite a few gulls.

Worth getting out for a sea watch if you’re in the Wellington area over the next two days I’d say! Cape Palliser would be pumping today, with surprisingly good visibility considering the storm.

David

Edit:

Did a quick seawatch from Kaikoura in a break in the weather, and it was rather quiet considering. A single Large Procellaria petrel was seen and some fluttons l and that was it in 5 minutes, so decided I’d rather be warm!

A few turnstones, banded Dotterels and oystercatchers on the rocky platforms at the peninsular carpark among the gulls seals and whitefaced herons.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Another interesting VOC :: Author jdowding]]> 2018-04-10T17:02:21+12:00 2018-04-10T17:02:21+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7694&p=36655#p36655

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Rainbow Lorikeets, Mt Albert, Auckland :: Author Michael Szabo]]> 2018-04-13T10:03:45+12:00 2018-04-13T10:03:45+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7699&p=36678#p36678 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Black-fronted Terns, Island Bay :: Author Michael Szabo]]> 2018-04-14T18:01:43+12:00 2018-04-14T18:01:43+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7701&p=36688#p36688
Link to photo: https://scontent.fpmr1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/ ... e=5B5A6B5C

Link to photo: https://scontent.fpmr1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/ ... e=5B5DEC96]]>

Link to photo: https://scontent.fpmr1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/ ... e=5B5A6B5C

Link to photo: https://scontent.fpmr1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/ ... e=5B5DEC96]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Cattle Egret, S Otago :: Author Richard Schofield]]> 2018-04-14T18:08:41+12:00 2018-04-14T18:08:41+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7702&p=36689#p36689 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Huntly Lakes & Morrinsville Birding :: Author RussCannings]]> 2018-04-14T18:34:52+12:00 2018-04-14T18:34:52+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7703&p=36690#p36690
Today Lisa was at a Hen's Due so... Translation: Birding day for me!

It has been a while since I've birded around Huntly so I decided to patrol some of the lakes in that area (Horseshoe, Rotokauri, Waahi, Puketirini, Rotongaroiti, Whangape, Waikare), then I stopped in at the Morrinsville poo ponds on the way home.

Horseshoe and Rotokauri in NW Hamilton were pretty quiet but the diversity was a bit better up in Huntly. Many of these lakes are nutrient-rich so are often algae-choked, high in sediment (and introduced fish) so a far cry from what they would have been like 100 years ago--so anything on the water is a good day! In general there were typically all 4 species of shag present in most areas, lots of Canada Geese (Including 800+ on Waikare), Black Swan, Mallard/hybrids, and Grey Teal. ~25 (two groups) and a single Caspian Tern were on Waahi, and there was a group of 17 ducks on Whangape that looked very Grey-like which is quite a count for dark-bodied/bold-faced/green+black speculum birds. Whangape also had 9 Royal Spoonbill in addition to other usuals.

On my way back south I stopped in at 3 access points to the large Lake Waikare. The surprise here was no less than 44 Caspian Terns either fishing or loafing on some islets in the NE corner of the lake. Caspian Terns are always in the Huntly area but usually in 1s, 2s, or 3s. The other high count was over 60 peafowl wandering in rough pasture on the east side of Waikare Rd (along with 50+ turkey). Probably many more but I only started carefully counting after the first 40 (spread out over a 5+km stretch of the road toward the SE end).

Finally, the Morrinsville WTP did not disappoint as I found my first ever BANDED DOTTEREL for the Waikato interior along with a leucistic Grey Teal--similar to a bird I saw at Maketu in the summer. Check out photos and the full checklist here:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44547528

I put everything else into eBird as well so you can find more specific numbers if you play around with the hotspots there. Let me know if you're not sure how to do that.

Russ C
Currently in Matangi, NZ]]>

Today Lisa was at a Hen's Due so... Translation: Birding day for me!

It has been a while since I've birded around Huntly so I decided to patrol some of the lakes in that area (Horseshoe, Rotokauri, Waahi, Puketirini, Rotongaroiti, Whangape, Waikare), then I stopped in at the Morrinsville poo ponds on the way home.

Horseshoe and Rotokauri in NW Hamilton were pretty quiet but the diversity was a bit better up in Huntly. Many of these lakes are nutrient-rich so are often algae-choked, high in sediment (and introduced fish) so a far cry from what they would have been like 100 years ago--so anything on the water is a good day! In general there were typically all 4 species of shag present in most areas, lots of Canada Geese (Including 800+ on Waikare), Black Swan, Mallard/hybrids, and Grey Teal. ~25 (two groups) and a single Caspian Tern were on Waahi, and there was a group of 17 ducks on Whangape that looked very Grey-like which is quite a count for dark-bodied/bold-faced/green+black speculum birds. Whangape also had 9 Royal Spoonbill in addition to other usuals.

On my way back south I stopped in at 3 access points to the large Lake Waikare. The surprise here was no less than 44 Caspian Terns either fishing or loafing on some islets in the NE corner of the lake. Caspian Terns are always in the Huntly area but usually in 1s, 2s, or 3s. The other high count was over 60 peafowl wandering in rough pasture on the east side of Waikare Rd (along with 50+ turkey). Probably many more but I only started carefully counting after the first 40 (spread out over a 5+km stretch of the road toward the SE end).

Finally, the Morrinsville WTP did not disappoint as I found my first ever BANDED DOTTEREL for the Waikato interior along with a leucistic Grey Teal--similar to a bird I saw at Maketu in the summer. Check out photos and the full checklist here:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44547528

I put everything else into eBird as well so you can find more specific numbers if you play around with the hotspots there. Let me know if you're not sure how to do that.

Russ C
Currently in Matangi, NZ]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Grey-tailed Tattler still at Ashley Estuary :: Author mikullashbee]]> 2018-04-13T17:03:25+12:00 2018-04-13T17:03:25+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7700&p=36683#p36683 Image
Grey-tailed Tattler
https://mikeashbee.smugmug.com
Cheers
Mike Ashbee]]>
Image
Grey-tailed Tattler
https://mikeashbee.smugmug.com
Cheers
Mike Ashbee]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Grey-tailed Tattler still at Ashley Estuary :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-04-13T22:52:33+12:00 2018-04-13T22:52:33+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7700&p=36685#p36685 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Grey-tailed Tattler still at Ashley Estuary :: Reply by mikullashbee]]> 2018-04-14T10:02:36+12:00 2018-04-14T10:02:36+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7700&p=36687#p36687 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Grey-tailed Tattler still at Ashley Estuary :: Reply by mikullashbee]]> 2018-04-15T13:24:25+12:00 2018-04-15T13:24:25+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7700&p=36692#p36692 Good birding
Mike Ashbee]]>
Good birding
Mike Ashbee]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington City biodiversity :: Reply by ledzep]]> 2018-03-25T16:47:36+13:00 2018-03-25T16:47:36+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=694&p=36480#p36480 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington City biodiversity :: Reply by sandyw]]> 2018-03-25T20:20:47+13:00 2018-03-25T20:20:47+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=694&p=36484#p36484

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington City biodiversity :: Reply by ledzep]]> 2018-03-29T21:00:43+13:00 2018-03-29T21:00:43+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=694&p=36523#p36523 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington City biodiversity :: Reply by sandyw]]> 2018-04-01T19:55:02+12:00 2018-04-01T19:55:02+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=694&p=36541#p36541
I've heard there are cirl buntings in the area, but no sign today. Anyone know if there have been any seen recently in Te Kopahou?

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I've heard there are cirl buntings in the area, but no sign today. Anyone know if there have been any seen recently in Te Kopahou?

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington City biodiversity :: Reply by ledzep]]> 2018-04-01T21:19:56+12:00 2018-04-01T21:19:56+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=694&p=36543#p36543 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington City biodiversity :: Reply by George Hobson]]> 2018-04-02T15:22:12+12:00 2018-04-02T15:22:12+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=694&p=36553#p36553
ledzep wrote:Baring Head yes, and further north Green Point to Titahi Bay area. But no reason why they shouldn't be in the Te Kopahau area as well.

Slightly off topic, but any tips for seeing them at baring head, pleasseee? I've tried there a large number of times, with no success. Thanks!]]>
ledzep wrote:Baring Head yes, and further north Green Point to Titahi Bay area. But no reason why they shouldn't be in the Te Kopahau area as well.

Slightly off topic, but any tips for seeing them at baring head, pleasseee? I've tried there a large number of times, with no success. Thanks!]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington City biodiversity :: Reply by CMKMStephens]]> 2018-04-02T19:19:45+12:00 2018-04-02T19:19:45+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=694&p=36558#p36558
Sunday walking from Ōtari-Wilton Bush to Wadestown, saw what looks more like a Harrier at extreme range, before it headed up towards Te Ahumairangi Hill. (2)

(1)
Image
(2)
Image]]>

Sunday walking from Ōtari-Wilton Bush to Wadestown, saw what looks more like a Harrier at extreme range, before it headed up towards Te Ahumairangi Hill. (2)

(1)
Image
(2)
Image]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington City biodiversity :: Reply by berle]]> 2018-04-04T11:23:03+12:00 2018-04-04T11:23:03+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=694&p=36585#p36585
The first was on the track near Table Hut, in from Otaki Forks.
Second was this weekend, at the southern end of the Big Bend Track in the Orongorongo Valley.

Leon]]>

The first was on the track near Table Hut, in from Otaki Forks.
Second was this weekend, at the southern end of the Big Bend Track in the Orongorongo Valley.

Leon]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington City biodiversity :: Reply by sandyw]]> 2018-04-06T19:12:02+12:00 2018-04-06T19:12:02+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=694&p=36607#p36607 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington City biodiversity :: Reply by Shamus]]> 2018-04-09T10:32:55+12:00 2018-04-09T10:32:55+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=694&p=36637#p36637
ledzep wrote:A pair of Falcons today sitting on a bare tree branch on the Belmont Trig Bridleway. Both appeared to be adult birds. Both flew off, but returned to the tree later so it may be a favourite vantage point. GPS 174.865634 -41.191401. Also some Whiteheads in a bush with Silvereyes about 100 metres further up. Whiteheads and Bellbirds calling from near Belmont Trig.
Video: https://youtu.be/pFrXoIPh9Dc
]]>

ledzep wrote:A pair of Falcons today sitting on a bare tree branch on the Belmont Trig Bridleway. Both appeared to be adult birds. Both flew off, but returned to the tree later so it may be a favourite vantage point. GPS 174.865634 -41.191401. Also some Whiteheads in a bush with Silvereyes about 100 metres further up. Whiteheads and Bellbirds calling from near Belmont Trig.
Video: https://youtu.be/pFrXoIPh9Dc
]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington City biodiversity :: Reply by CMKMStephens]]> 2018-04-15T14:13:07+12:00 2018-04-15T14:13:07+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=694&p=36693#p36693
Image

I hate to be that person with the blurry photos, but looking at a couple of photos from the end of the day at Pariwhero / Red Rocks, are these just Caspian terns or something more interesting? Looks like red/orange bill, black head, long neck

https://i.imgur.com/M7uMMjM.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/kCt9z4I.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/RUpeqsy.jpg

Image

Similarly, together with a couple hundred White-fronted terns, there were a few on the taller rock that looked a little different (is there a technical term for tern-based wishful thinking?)

https://i.imgur.com/LWKFPhk.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/Xnw81tY.jpg

centre and top right
Image]]>

Image

I hate to be that person with the blurry photos, but looking at a couple of photos from the end of the day at Pariwhero / Red Rocks, are these just Caspian terns or something more interesting? Looks like red/orange bill, black head, long neck

https://i.imgur.com/M7uMMjM.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/kCt9z4I.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/RUpeqsy.jpg

Image

Similarly, together with a couple hundred White-fronted terns, there were a few on the taller rock that looked a little different (is there a technical term for tern-based wishful thinking?)

https://i.imgur.com/LWKFPhk.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/Xnw81tY.jpg

centre and top right
Image]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Pure white seagull :: Reply by Remi]]> 2018-04-15T18:40:39+12:00 2018-04-15T18:40:39+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4603&p=36695#p36695 I Just saw that pure white gull today at Nelson and I took a picture as it is the first time I se a similar bird
20180414_174328.jpg

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I Just saw that pure white gull today at Nelson and I took a picture as it is the first time I se a similar bird
20180414_174328.jpg

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Two Black kites - Northland :: Author Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-04-16T07:15:14+12:00 2018-04-16T07:15:14+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7705&p=36696#p36696
Saw 2 black kites yesterday on Hway 12 between Kaikohe and Rawene turnoff. They were near turn off to Otua ora place similar. I have a witness to the 2nd bird too.]]>

Saw 2 black kites yesterday on Hway 12 between Kaikohe and Rawene turnoff. They were near turn off to Otua ora place similar. I have a witness to the 2nd bird too.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Two Black kites - Northland :: Reply by sav]]> 2018-04-16T09:52:41+12:00 2018-04-16T09:52:41+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7705&p=36698#p36698
Before you race up there, show him a photo of a juv Swamp Harrier.

cheers]]>

Before you race up there, show him a photo of a juv Swamp Harrier.

cheers]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Two Black kites - Northland :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-04-16T21:42:13+12:00 2018-04-16T21:42:13+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7705&p=36701#p36701
Hi Oscar. I see zillions of trillions juv harriers. Plenty around ATM but no way juv harriers. I think a few or a flock must have come over and maybe fragmented on the way as a guess of course. I will be up there again and will keep my eye out. I have also seen harriers recently with split tails eg a feather or 2 missing in the middle. I also saw the kite at Meremere 15 plus years ago and the one near Blenhiem several years ago too plus hoards overseas.]]>

Hi Oscar. I see zillions of trillions juv harriers. Plenty around ATM but no way juv harriers. I think a few or a flock must have come over and maybe fragmented on the way as a guess of course. I will be up there again and will keep my eye out. I have also seen harriers recently with split tails eg a feather or 2 missing in the middle. I also saw the kite at Meremere 15 plus years ago and the one near Blenhiem several years ago too plus hoards overseas.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Two Black kites - Northland :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-04-16T22:59:03+12:00 2018-04-16T22:59:03+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7705&p=36702#p36702 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Lake Ellesmere birding :: Author andrewcrossland]]> 2018-04-02T19:05:34+12:00 2018-04-02T19:05:34+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7679&p=36557#p36557 13 pacific golden plover
2 sharp-tailed sandpiper
1 godwit
2 red-necked stint.
This is the time of year (late feb to late April ) when all the good stuff turns up sp folks, keep your eyes open....]]>
13 pacific golden plover
2 sharp-tailed sandpiper
1 godwit
2 red-necked stint.
This is the time of year (late feb to late April ) when all the good stuff turns up sp folks, keep your eyes open....]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lake Ellesmere birding :: Reply by mikullashbee]]> 2018-04-03T08:22:31+12:00 2018-04-03T08:22:31+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7679&p=36569#p36569 Cheers
Mike Ashbee
https://mikeashbee.smugmug.com
Image
Curlew Sandpiper
Image
Red Knot showing rhynchokinesis
Image
Red Knot
Image
Red-necked Stint
Image
Pied StiltXBlack Stilt]]>
Cheers
Mike Ashbee
https://mikeashbee.smugmug.com
Image
Curlew Sandpiper
Image
Red Knot showing rhynchokinesis
Image
Red Knot
Image
Red-necked Stint
Image
Pied StiltXBlack Stilt]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lake Ellesmere birding :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-04-03T08:54:09+12:00 2018-04-03T08:54:09+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7679&p=36571#p36571 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lake Ellesmere birding :: Reply by mikullashbee]]> 2018-04-06T18:21:33+12:00 2018-04-06T18:21:33+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7679&p=36604#p36604 On Wednesday morning I had a group of 10 Sharp-tailed Sandpipers and they are well on their way into breeding plumage and looking rather sharp i might add.This was a huge highlight for me as i have never seen them in this stage. I am use to seeing the odd juvenile in Canada, and since moving here i haven't seen them with this much colour or black chevrons on the flanks. 3 Curlew Sandpipers, one in full breeding plumage, the one i posted the other day going into breeding plumage, and one in non-breeding plumage. 50 or so Red-necked Stint and 4 PGP all on the way into breeding plumage but seemingly a ways off yet.
This morning i was joined by my friend Ben for another go. The only bird we were able to add onto this tally was a lone Pectoral Sandpiper, a lifer for Ben, and the first time I have managed to get on one this season. I will attach a record shot just incase its some weird hybrid i've never heard of, you know like a bloody Cox's Sandpiper.lol. Speaking of which where did his internal compass drop him this year.
Image
Pectoral Sandpiper
Image
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper breeding plumage
Image
Red-necked Stint
https://mikeashbee.smugmug.com
Good Birding
Mike Ashbee]]>
On Wednesday morning I had a group of 10 Sharp-tailed Sandpipers and they are well on their way into breeding plumage and looking rather sharp i might add.This was a huge highlight for me as i have never seen them in this stage. I am use to seeing the odd juvenile in Canada, and since moving here i haven't seen them with this much colour or black chevrons on the flanks. 3 Curlew Sandpipers, one in full breeding plumage, the one i posted the other day going into breeding plumage, and one in non-breeding plumage. 50 or so Red-necked Stint and 4 PGP all on the way into breeding plumage but seemingly a ways off yet.
This morning i was joined by my friend Ben for another go. The only bird we were able to add onto this tally was a lone Pectoral Sandpiper, a lifer for Ben, and the first time I have managed to get on one this season. I will attach a record shot just incase its some weird hybrid i've never heard of, you know like a bloody Cox's Sandpiper.lol. Speaking of which where did his internal compass drop him this year.
Image
Pectoral Sandpiper
Image
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper breeding plumage
Image
Red-necked Stint
https://mikeashbee.smugmug.com
Good Birding
Mike Ashbee]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lake Ellesmere birding :: Reply by mikullashbee]]> 2018-04-08T16:59:46+12:00 2018-04-08T16:59:46+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7679&p=36630#p36630 Image]]> Image]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lake Ellesmere birding :: Reply by mikullashbee]]> 2018-04-18T11:05:39+12:00 2018-04-18T11:05:39+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7679&p=36711#p36711 Image
Red-necked Stint
Image
Red-necked Stint
Good birding
Mike Ashbee
Christchurch]]>
Image
Red-necked Stint
Image
Red-necked Stint
Good birding
Mike Ashbee
Christchurch]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Author pfe92nz]]> 2018-04-09T12:04:48+12:00 2018-04-09T12:04:48+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36639#p36639 On the red zone land in the block bordered by New Brighton Road, Hawke Street, Keyes Road, Pratt Street.
Was quite happy feeding in the grass with a few starlings nearby.
Maybe an escapee.

John Stewart]]>
On the red zone land in the block bordered by New Brighton Road, Hawke Street, Keyes Road, Pratt Street.
Was quite happy feeding in the grass with a few starlings nearby.
Maybe an escapee.

John Stewart]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by pfe92nz]]> 2018-04-09T12:20:03+12:00 2018-04-09T12:20:03+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36640#p36640 20180409_7402_Canon EOS 7D Mark II-400 mm.jpg

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by Michael Szabo]]> 2018-04-09T14:36:18+12:00 2018-04-09T14:36:18+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36643#p36643 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by pfe92nz]]> 2018-04-09T15:47:53+12:00 2018-04-09T15:47:53+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36644#p36644 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-04-09T16:58:37+12:00 2018-04-09T16:58:37+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36646#p36646 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by pfe92nz]]> 2018-04-10T17:49:43+12:00 2018-04-10T17:49:43+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36656#p36656 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by pfe92nz]]> 2018-04-11T11:51:04+12:00 2018-04-11T11:51:04+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36661#p36661 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-04-11T20:01:36+12:00 2018-04-11T20:01:36+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36665#p36665 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by Davidthomas]]> 2018-04-11T20:46:22+12:00 2018-04-11T20:46:22+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36667#p36667 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by pfe92nz]]> 2018-04-12T09:27:04+12:00 2018-04-12T09:27:04+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36670#p36670 20180409_7402_Canon EOS 7D Mark II-400 mm-3.jpg

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20180409_7402_Canon EOS 7D Mark II-400 mm-3.jpg

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by GrahameNZ]]> 2018-04-12T12:26:24+12:00 2018-04-12T12:26:24+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36672#p36672 When a Harrier came through I'm pretty sure it went into the Phoenix plam on the roundabout.
Thanks for the heads up pfe92nz, another oddball for my ChCh list :D]]>
When a Harrier came through I'm pretty sure it went into the Phoenix plam on the roundabout.
Thanks for the heads up pfe92nz, another oddball for my ChCh list :D]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by GrahameNZ]]> 2018-04-12T16:04:06+12:00 2018-04-12T16:04:06+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36674#p36674
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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by Paul Scofield]]> 2018-04-13T15:42:38+12:00 2018-04-13T15:42:38+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36679#p36679 By the way it is worth mentioning that there is nothing to categorically determine this bird came from the North Island. Indeed a look at the shipping schedule for Lyttleton shows ships from Hong Kong, Australia, Suva and the Middle East in the last couple of weeks. Ships entering the port sit off New Brighton sometimes for several days and its only a hop skip and a jump for a hungry bird from a ship to this site. Furthermore ports such as Hong Kong are literally crawling with mynas whereas Auckland is rather quiet. New Zealand coastal shipping operators may also more inclined to note a itinerant bird given NZ concerns over biosecurity. As an aside I suspect another New Zealand House Crow is only a matter of time - the 1945 & 1949 records of unidentified corvids in the outer Hauraki Gulf seem almost certainly to be ship assisted House Crows.
P]]>
By the way it is worth mentioning that there is nothing to categorically determine this bird came from the North Island. Indeed a look at the shipping schedule for Lyttleton shows ships from Hong Kong, Australia, Suva and the Middle East in the last couple of weeks. Ships entering the port sit off New Brighton sometimes for several days and its only a hop skip and a jump for a hungry bird from a ship to this site. Furthermore ports such as Hong Kong are literally crawling with mynas whereas Auckland is rather quiet. New Zealand coastal shipping operators may also more inclined to note a itinerant bird given NZ concerns over biosecurity. As an aside I suspect another New Zealand House Crow is only a matter of time - the 1945 & 1949 records of unidentified corvids in the outer Hauraki Gulf seem almost certainly to be ship assisted House Crows.
P]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by GrahameNZ]]> 2018-04-13T15:51:07+12:00 2018-04-13T15:51:07+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36680#p36680 ]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by pfe92nz]]> 2018-04-13T16:08:30+12:00 2018-04-14T08:09:49+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36681#p36681
And a lot around the port of Suva too.]]>

And a lot around the port of Suva too.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-04-13T16:43:58+12:00 2018-04-13T16:43:58+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36682#p36682
Note lack of black colour at base of yellow beak, instead it is pink.

In adult the yellow beak have black base.


GrahameNZ wrote:Is this a young bird ?

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Note lack of black colour at base of yellow beak, instead it is pink.

In adult the yellow beak have black base.


GrahameNZ wrote:Is this a young bird ?

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-04-13T17:16:31+12:00 2018-04-13T17:16:31+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36684#p36684
Indian myna...how to age..jpg

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Indian myna...how to age..jpg

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by GrahameNZ]]> 2018-04-14T08:44:11+12:00 2018-04-14T08:44:11+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36686#p36686 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-04-16T23:07:42+12:00 2018-04-16T23:07:42+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36703#p36703 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by pfe92nz]]> 2018-04-17T09:45:19+12:00 2018-04-17T09:45:19+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36704#p36704
John (pfe92nz)]]>

John (pfe92nz)]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by TheBirderman]]> 2018-04-17T19:05:41+12:00 2018-04-17T19:05:41+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36708#p36708 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by pfe92nz]]> 2018-04-19T11:52:32+12:00 2018-04-19T11:52:32+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36713#p36713 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by GrahameNZ]]> 2018-04-19T18:49:03+12:00 2018-04-19T18:49:03+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=36717#p36717 One of the joys of urban birding.
I'd spent five or so minutes going away from it and then using trees to work back close.
Plan A worked well.
It then took flight and as I turned to watch it fly across the river a large dog bounded up to say hi.
Closely followed by its owner.
He asked me what I was taking pics of and appeared rather bemused when I replied nothing :)
We've all been ther and will again, guess it will always give me a bit of an inner smile.

Myna_GNZ20180419-7921.jpg

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One of the joys of urban birding.
I'd spent five or so minutes going away from it and then using trees to work back close.
Plan A worked well.
It then took flight and as I turned to watch it fly across the river a large dog bounded up to say hi.
Closely followed by its owner.
He asked me what I was taking pics of and appeared rather bemused when I replied nothing :)
We've all been ther and will again, guess it will always give me a bit of an inner smile.

Myna_GNZ20180419-7921.jpg

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Author Tim Barnard]]> 2018-03-25T17:16:08+13:00 2018-03-25T17:16:08+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36481#p36481 Tim]]> Tim]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by erikforsyth]]> 2018-03-26T15:53:16+13:00 2018-03-26T15:53:16+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36492#p36492
fantastic find Tim! keen to hear your update, I will head there on Saturday and try locate

cheers
Erik

Rockjumper Birding Tours
www.rockjumperbirding.com]]>

fantastic find Tim! keen to hear your update, I will head there on Saturday and try locate

cheers
Erik

Rockjumper Birding Tours
www.rockjumperbirding.com]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-03-26T18:31:10+13:00 2018-03-26T18:31:10+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36494#p36494 It was a day I won't forget. Torrential rain all the way from Okere Falls to Little Waihi. Nearly turned back several times. The LSP was feeding in those soft sinky muds in the SW corner (which you know well). To be honest it isn't hard to distinguish from the bandies. I spotted it from 50m. Its clean white breast and pronounced shoulder tabs, stubby bill, longish legs compared to the bandies - does stand out. Has none of the warm tones either. Nice bird. I got within 20m but in the driving monsoon rain my little digicamera gave up and died. I'll be back on Wednesday night. Very keen to get some shots. Marsh sands were there and the hudwit too (and that is looking stunning). About 70 Godwit and 40 knot also present.

On the way out and in a moment of relatively less rain I found this character stuck and alive in the channel. Little I could do to help .. . But the tide was coming in and a big tide too. I went passed the spot on the way back and it had gone ... hopefully out to sea. But. For those of you that know the site, the wade back from the island to the jetty, through chest high water, was a little more interesting than usual. I may have done it in record time ...

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It was a day I won't forget. Torrential rain all the way from Okere Falls to Little Waihi. Nearly turned back several times. The LSP was feeding in those soft sinky muds in the SW corner (which you know well). To be honest it isn't hard to distinguish from the bandies. I spotted it from 50m. Its clean white breast and pronounced shoulder tabs, stubby bill, longish legs compared to the bandies - does stand out. Has none of the warm tones either. Nice bird. I got within 20m but in the driving monsoon rain my little digicamera gave up and died. I'll be back on Wednesday night. Very keen to get some shots. Marsh sands were there and the hudwit too (and that is looking stunning). About 70 Godwit and 40 knot also present.

On the way out and in a moment of relatively less rain I found this character stuck and alive in the channel. Little I could do to help .. . But the tide was coming in and a big tide too. I went passed the spot on the way back and it had gone ... hopefully out to sea. But. For those of you that know the site, the wade back from the island to the jetty, through chest high water, was a little more interesting than usual. I may have done it in record time ...

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by philbattley]]> 2018-03-27T12:50:48+13:00 2018-03-27T12:50:48+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36499#p36499 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by philbattley]]> 2018-03-27T12:53:00+13:00 2018-03-27T12:53:00+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36500#p36500 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by Steve Wood]]> 2018-03-27T16:33:20+13:00 2018-03-27T16:33:20+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36502#p36502 ]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by philbattley]]> 2018-03-27T16:36:16+13:00 2018-03-27T16:36:16+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36503#p36503 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-03-27T18:20:59+13:00 2018-03-27T18:20:59+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36504#p36504 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by Wandoona]]> 2018-03-27T19:32:12+13:00 2018-03-27T19:32:12+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36505#p36505 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-03-28T07:15:00+13:00 2018-03-28T07:15:00+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36506#p36506
Bandies were roosting on Pukehina Spit on Saturday with Wrybill. It could drop in there. It could be in the wet fields at the back of Little Waihi down Wharere Rd. Or over at Maketu - there were 80 bandies in the fields at the corner of Kaituna and Ford Rds with 86 PGPs. All those fields are good and wet.

Or try Te Paika further down the road ... there are bandies in those fields too.

I still think that muddy corner an hour before high tide is the best before they lift and roost. Always been good. Birds concentrate there. But its thick stinky muds and means a kayak or wading.

Just need a working camera.]]>

Bandies were roosting on Pukehina Spit on Saturday with Wrybill. It could drop in there. It could be in the wet fields at the back of Little Waihi down Wharere Rd. Or over at Maketu - there were 80 bandies in the fields at the corner of Kaituna and Ford Rds with 86 PGPs. All those fields are good and wet.

Or try Te Paika further down the road ... there are bandies in those fields too.

I still think that muddy corner an hour before high tide is the best before they lift and roost. Always been good. Birds concentrate there. But its thick stinky muds and means a kayak or wading.

Just need a working camera.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by wghabbott]]> 2018-03-28T17:47:33+13:00 2018-03-28T17:47:33+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36510#p36510 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-03-29T07:16:11+13:00 2018-03-29T07:16:11+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36513#p36513 Excellent.
027 475 8979]]>
Excellent.
027 475 8979]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by wghabbott]]> 2018-03-29T09:51:02+13:00 2018-03-29T09:51:02+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36516#p36516 Thanks Tim]]> Thanks Tim]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-03-30T12:49:03+13:00 2018-03-30T12:49:03+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36527#p36527 Good luck to those searching over the weekend.]]> Good luck to those searching over the weekend.]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-03-31T09:19:25+13:00 2018-03-31T09:19:25+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36530#p36530 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-03-31T18:52:50+13:00 2018-03-31T18:52:50+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36536#p36536
David Thomas, some visiting Canadian friends and I birded the Little Waihi and Maketu area for most of Saturday. We started at Pukehina Spit around high tide where a good assortment of birds were roosting including 2 Little Tern (1 ad 1 imm) and 1 RN Stint.

We then patrolled the fields and Maketu estuary without turning up to much. After lunch we hit the mudflats of Little Waihi around low tide and refound 1 Little Tern and the stint along with a juv Black-fronted Tern near the holiday park. A Marsh Sandpiper was picked out in the SW corner and after a few hums, haws, and false alarms, we spotted the Lesser Sand Plover near the maimai in th3 middle if the bay. Unfortunately due tithe wind the bird mainly faced away from us which frustrated my digiscoping attempts. We did however make careful nite of the larger size to nearby bandies, very well defined dark grey shoulder tabs, pure white and grey appearance, darker mask, etc.

No sign of the hudwit or second marshie. Will post full ebird list later.

AC--Tim and others do a fairly decent job of adding sightings to ebird but perhaps a more formal count could be a great idea.

Russ C]]>

David Thomas, some visiting Canadian friends and I birded the Little Waihi and Maketu area for most of Saturday. We started at Pukehina Spit around high tide where a good assortment of birds were roosting including 2 Little Tern (1 ad 1 imm) and 1 RN Stint.

We then patrolled the fields and Maketu estuary without turning up to much. After lunch we hit the mudflats of Little Waihi around low tide and refound 1 Little Tern and the stint along with a juv Black-fronted Tern near the holiday park. A Marsh Sandpiper was picked out in the SW corner and after a few hums, haws, and false alarms, we spotted the Lesser Sand Plover near the maimai in th3 middle if the bay. Unfortunately due tithe wind the bird mainly faced away from us which frustrated my digiscoping attempts. We did however make careful nite of the larger size to nearby bandies, very well defined dark grey shoulder tabs, pure white and grey appearance, darker mask, etc.

No sign of the hudwit or second marshie. Will post full ebird list later.

AC--Tim and others do a fairly decent job of adding sightings to ebird but perhaps a more formal count could be a great idea.

Russ C]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-03-31T19:08:09+13:00 2018-03-31T19:08:09+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36537#p36537 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-03-31T22:36:42+13:00 2018-03-31T22:36:42+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36539#p36539 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-04-02T15:16:00+12:00 2018-04-02T15:16:00+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36552#p36552
With regard to census data. There are very few birders in the BoP, and even fewer that do local patch work. We struggle to get enough people to do the 'official' census let alone monthly counts. There are few sites that get more regular updates than Maketu and LW in NZ. Birding is passion for me, its not a job, I don't get paid to do it, I do it because I love it. I submit ebird data, UBRs, photos and band data wherever and whenever I can but like I said, I have a job to hold down and time can be pressured.

Little Waihi is one the best little estuaries in NZ, its produced some stunning birds in recent times and I am more than happy to show people around. If either of you are up this way, you are more than welcome to join me for an afternoon. If there are any birders in the BoP who are keen to help collect data or just look and explore some amazing places - get in touch.

Awesome to hear you had a great day Russell, David et al ...]]>

With regard to census data. There are very few birders in the BoP, and even fewer that do local patch work. We struggle to get enough people to do the 'official' census let alone monthly counts. There are few sites that get more regular updates than Maketu and LW in NZ. Birding is passion for me, its not a job, I don't get paid to do it, I do it because I love it. I submit ebird data, UBRs, photos and band data wherever and whenever I can but like I said, I have a job to hold down and time can be pressured.

Little Waihi is one the best little estuaries in NZ, its produced some stunning birds in recent times and I am more than happy to show people around. If either of you are up this way, you are more than welcome to join me for an afternoon. If there are any birders in the BoP who are keen to help collect data or just look and explore some amazing places - get in touch.

Awesome to hear you had a great day Russell, David et al ...]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by philbattley]]> 2018-04-02T19:56:29+12:00 2018-04-02T19:56:29+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36560#p36560 Cheers, Phil]]> Cheers, Phil]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-04-02T20:31:47+12:00 2018-04-02T20:31:47+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36563#p36563
Here's the Black-fronted Tern--a Bay of Plenty lifer for me.
BFTE_LW.jpg


The next two should be of the Lesser Sand Plover, though it was a battle to get a shot when this bird wasn't preening or facing directly away into the wind. I worry that what I do have is misleading given the poor resolution and harsh lighting. Still, the first shot shows the short but thick bill, broad white forehead, and grey-white appearance compared to the brown/buff/golden tones of the Bandies.
LSPL2.jpg

This second (and even worse resolution) pic shows the contrast in overall colour and breast pattern between the sand plover (right) and Bandie (left). Size/structure is misleading as we all noted the larger size and slightly taller stance in the field (Which is not at all evident in this photo--perhaps due to deep mud and angle?). I had expected to find a taller, more horizontal bird--however after studying the 2 Big Sand Island Greaters, which were barely larger than Bandies, this would seem to be within range of variation for Lessers. Also note the clean white underparts and chest, and grey shoulder tabs.
LSPL.jpg


So take the above how you will. Field notes might be more valuable in cases like this as our scope views were far superior to these photos. Unfortunately a harrier flushed the dotterels and wrybills about 5min after we found it and we could not relocate the bird after the birds re-settled.

Thanks Tim for getting the word out on this awesome place.

Russ C
Cambridge, NZ

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Here's the Black-fronted Tern--a Bay of Plenty lifer for me.
BFTE_LW.jpg


The next two should be of the Lesser Sand Plover, though it was a battle to get a shot when this bird wasn't preening or facing directly away into the wind. I worry that what I do have is misleading given the poor resolution and harsh lighting. Still, the first shot shows the short but thick bill, broad white forehead, and grey-white appearance compared to the brown/buff/golden tones of the Bandies.
LSPL2.jpg

This second (and even worse resolution) pic shows the contrast in overall colour and breast pattern between the sand plover (right) and Bandie (left). Size/structure is misleading as we all noted the larger size and slightly taller stance in the field (Which is not at all evident in this photo--perhaps due to deep mud and angle?). I had expected to find a taller, more horizontal bird--however after studying the 2 Big Sand Island Greaters, which were barely larger than Bandies, this would seem to be within range of variation for Lessers. Also note the clean white underparts and chest, and grey shoulder tabs.
LSPL.jpg


So take the above how you will. Field notes might be more valuable in cases like this as our scope views were far superior to these photos. Unfortunately a harrier flushed the dotterels and wrybills about 5min after we found it and we could not relocate the bird after the birds re-settled.

Thanks Tim for getting the word out on this awesome place.

Russ C
Cambridge, NZ

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BFTE_LW.jpg (174.54 KiB)



LSPL2.jpg (118.64 KiB)



LSPL.jpg (112.55 KiB)


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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-04-17T18:39:10+12:00 2018-04-17T18:39:10+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36707#p36707 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by Michael Szabo]]> 2018-04-18T20:39:27+12:00 2018-04-18T20:39:27+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36712#p36712 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-04-19T13:00:19+12:00 2018-04-19T13:00:19+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36715#p36715 Cheers
Grahame]]>
Cheers
Grahame]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Lesser Sand Plover - Little Waihi :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-04-20T18:50:54+12:00 2018-04-20T18:50:54+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7659&p=36723#p36723 Where was it?
I will be up there sometime this weekend.
T]]>
Where was it?
I will be up there sometime this weekend.
T]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: 8 Cape Barren Geese in Omata, Taranaki :: Author RussCannings]]> 2018-04-20T19:33:45+12:00 2018-04-20T19:33:45+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7710&p=36724#p36724
Interesting report of 8 Cape Barren Geese in the New Plymouth area:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42736860

I'll be in the area in the next few days so will take a closer look to see if any providence clues are on offer.

Russ C
Waikato]]>

Interesting report of 8 Cape Barren Geese in the New Plymouth area:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42736860

I'll be in the area in the next few days so will take a closer look to see if any providence clues are on offer.

Russ C
Waikato]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 8 Cape Barren Geese in Omata, Taranaki :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-04-20T19:45:45+12:00 2018-04-20T19:45:45+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7710&p=36725#p36725 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Long-tailed Skua - Bay of Islands :: Author sav]]> 2018-04-16T09:50:22+12:00 2018-04-16T09:50:22+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7706&p=36697#p36697
Ross Silcock has alerted me to a photo of a Long-tailed Skua off Cape Brett in the BoI last week (11 April) - the eBird link is https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44484406

Originally described as a Wedge-tailed Shearwater (??) it is now captioned as a Parasitic Jaeger ( aka Arctic Skua)..

cheers]]>

Ross Silcock has alerted me to a photo of a Long-tailed Skua off Cape Brett in the BoI last week (11 April) - the eBird link is https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44484406

Originally described as a Wedge-tailed Shearwater (??) it is now captioned as a Parasitic Jaeger ( aka Arctic Skua)..

cheers]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Long-tailed Skua - Bay of Islands :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-04-16T19:25:51+12:00 2018-04-16T19:25:51+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7706&p=36699#p36699
So why isn't this a Parasitic/Arctic Skua? Appears to be a dark morph adult which is extremely rare in Long-tailed, there appear to be pale shafts visible in the underwing, the bill seems biggish for LT (and possibly bicoloured) and the tail doesn't seem to rule out Arctic in central primary projection.

Russ C]]>

So why isn't this a Parasitic/Arctic Skua? Appears to be a dark morph adult which is extremely rare in Long-tailed, there appear to be pale shafts visible in the underwing, the bill seems biggish for LT (and possibly bicoloured) and the tail doesn't seem to rule out Arctic in central primary projection.

Russ C]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Long-tailed Skua - Bay of Islands :: Reply by Steve Wood]]> 2018-04-16T20:16:13+12:00 2018-04-16T20:16:13+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7706&p=36700#p36700
If the pic was not so underexposed I think it would be a more obvious that it is indeed a Long Tailed (for me anyway).
Only three pale primary shafts visible on the upper wing , no visible marking on the underwing apart from one smallest glint on one primary.I would expect more even on the darkest Skua. Hugely variable I know.
I confident, if it was "lightened up " you would see much better that is actually steel grey coloured above with a dark trailing edge to the upper inner wing which would be diagnostic alone. Bill and head shape fine.]]>

If the pic was not so underexposed I think it would be a more obvious that it is indeed a Long Tailed (for me anyway).
Only three pale primary shafts visible on the upper wing , no visible marking on the underwing apart from one smallest glint on one primary.I would expect more even on the darkest Skua. Hugely variable I know.
I confident, if it was "lightened up " you would see much better that is actually steel grey coloured above with a dark trailing edge to the upper inner wing which would be diagnostic alone. Bill and head shape fine.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Long-tailed Skua - Bay of Islands :: Reply by sav]]> 2018-04-17T10:02:32+12:00 2018-04-17T10:02:32+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7706&p=36705#p36705
Thanks for the message. To my mind this just looks like a Long-tailed, and I know it is hard to get jizz from a single shot, but this one has it for me.

Just ignore the colour for a moment (because I think the exposure is clouding the issue) and there is the silhouette of a Long-tail. Small head and bill, that hunched appearance which is just right, broad based wings with slightly rounded tips (which is how they often look even though no literature will support that!) and a tail that is proportionally way too long for Arctic.

The 2 and a bit white upperwing primary shafts are more or less diagnostic and the single underwing shaft says nothing. I think that lightening the image will probably show that the belly is pale, and the trailing edge of the upperwing is dark. So maybe not a dark morph adult at all?

If the guy has any other, even out of focus, shots they would help.]]>

Thanks for the message. To my mind this just looks like a Long-tailed, and I know it is hard to get jizz from a single shot, but this one has it for me.

Just ignore the colour for a moment (because I think the exposure is clouding the issue) and there is the silhouette of a Long-tail. Small head and bill, that hunched appearance which is just right, broad based wings with slightly rounded tips (which is how they often look even though no literature will support that!) and a tail that is proportionally way too long for Arctic.

The 2 and a bit white upperwing primary shafts are more or less diagnostic and the single underwing shaft says nothing. I think that lightening the image will probably show that the belly is pale, and the trailing edge of the upperwing is dark. So maybe not a dark morph adult at all?

If the guy has any other, even out of focus, shots they would help.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Long-tailed Skua - Bay of Islands :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-04-20T19:55:19+12:00 2018-04-20T19:55:19+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7706&p=36726#p36726
I contacted the observer was able to send me some lightened up additional photos. To my eyes they seem to show a dark/intermediate adult (He did not note any white belly in the field) with over 3 white shafts on the upperside and definite covert contrast in the underparts along with a nape pattern unlike typical LTs. Tail also looks shorter with more side-on angle. Whaddya think?

Parasitic Jaeger (1 of 1)-2.jpg

Parasitic Jaeger (1 of 1).jpg

Attachments



Parasitic Jaeger (1 of 1).jpg (103.05 KiB)



Parasitic Jaeger (1 of 1)-2.jpg (80.46 KiB)


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I contacted the observer was able to send me some lightened up additional photos. To my eyes they seem to show a dark/intermediate adult (He did not note any white belly in the field) with over 3 white shafts on the upperside and definite covert contrast in the underparts along with a nape pattern unlike typical LTs. Tail also looks shorter with more side-on angle. Whaddya think?

Parasitic Jaeger (1 of 1)-2.jpg

Parasitic Jaeger (1 of 1).jpg

Attachments



Parasitic Jaeger (1 of 1).jpg (103.05 KiB)



Parasitic Jaeger (1 of 1)-2.jpg (80.46 KiB)


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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Kookaburra Matakana road :: Reply by TheBirderman]]> 2018-04-20T15:26:25+12:00 2018-04-20T15:26:25+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4695&p=36722#p36722 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Kookaburra Matakana road :: Reply by chris]]> 2018-04-20T20:06:00+12:00 2018-04-20T20:06:00+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4695&p=36727#p36727 Are the northland kookies blue wings.it looks like it in your photos. If so and im probably mistaken. Blue wings dont have the famous bush cry of the old tarzan movies. Which mystifies me because im sure i have read posts of annoyed locals complaining about the noise. I lived in a part of australia for many years which had both species and unlike the browns the bluewings were mainly solitary and quiet and call less.]]> Are the northland kookies blue wings.it looks like it in your photos. If so and im probably mistaken. Blue wings dont have the famous bush cry of the old tarzan movies. Which mystifies me because im sure i have read posts of annoyed locals complaining about the noise. I lived in a part of australia for many years which had both species and unlike the browns the bluewings were mainly solitary and quiet and call less.]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Kookaburra Matakana road :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-04-20T20:52:38+12:00 2018-04-20T20:52:38+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4695&p=36728#p36728 Dacelo novaeguineae), not the blue-winged (Dacelo leachii).]]> Dacelo novaeguineae), not the blue-winged (Dacelo leachii).]]> <![CDATA[Young Birders :: No posts here for a long time? :: Author andrewcrossland]]> 2018-03-31T14:00:51+13:00 2018-03-31T14:00:51+13:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=7668&p=36534#p36534 <![CDATA[South Pacific Birds :: Phylogeography of Indo-Pacific Cicadabirds :: Author Michael Szabo]]> 2018-04-15T10:10:21+12:00 2018-04-15T10:10:21+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=7704&p=36691#p36691
Aim: We derive a new phylogenetic framework of the Indo-Pacific avian genus Edolisoma based on a dense taxon sampling and use it in an explicit spatiotemporal framework to understand the history of intraspecific diversification dynamics in a ‘great speciator’, the Cicadabird Edolisoma tenuirostre/remotum complex.

Methods: We used Bayesian phylogenetic methods (BEAST) to construct a time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of all 19 species in the genus
Edolisoma and 27 of 29 subspecies of the E. tenuirostre/remotum complex (previously Coracina tenuirostris) primarily based on one mitochondrial DNA marker. Ancestral area reconstruction methods (‘BioGeoBEARS’) were used to infer the historical biogeography of the genus. We used population-level analyses to assess intraspecific phylogeography and a molecular species delimitation test to evaluate the current taxonomy. A morphometric dataset was used to discuss differential dispersal ability among taxa.

Results: Edolisoma originated in the late Miocene and diversification within the E. tenuirostre/remotum complex began in the Pleistocene. Within the North Melanesian and North Wallacean archipelagos, which have experienced several waves of diversification, we find significant patterns of genetic isolation by distance, but not within the Australo-Papuan ‘mainland’, which was recently back-colonised from these archipelagos. Based on the phylogeny, we suggest several taxonomic changes. We also discuss evidence of taxon cycles within Edolisoma based on correlations of species age, elevational ranges and dispersal ability.

Main conclusions: The biogeographical history and patterns of differentiation between phylogroups within E. tenuirostre support the importance of barriers to gene flow in island systems. Examples of both recent genetic exchange across significant sea barriers and differentiation across much smaller water gaps suggest complex dispersal and diversification dynamics. The capacity for dispersal away from islands, and gradual shifts in dispersal ability in relation to the geographical setting, is supported as important factors in generating a ‘great speciator'.

Link to the full study + maps: http://macroecointern.dk/pdf-reprints/P ... B_2018.pdf]]>

Aim: We derive a new phylogenetic framework of the Indo-Pacific avian genus Edolisoma based on a dense taxon sampling and use it in an explicit spatiotemporal framework to understand the history of intraspecific diversification dynamics in a ‘great speciator’, the Cicadabird Edolisoma tenuirostre/remotum complex.

Methods: We used Bayesian phylogenetic methods (BEAST) to construct a time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of all 19 species in the genus
Edolisoma and 27 of 29 subspecies of the E. tenuirostre/remotum complex (previously Coracina tenuirostris) primarily based on one mitochondrial DNA marker. Ancestral area reconstruction methods (‘BioGeoBEARS’) were used to infer the historical biogeography of the genus. We used population-level analyses to assess intraspecific phylogeography and a molecular species delimitation test to evaluate the current taxonomy. A morphometric dataset was used to discuss differential dispersal ability among taxa.

Results: Edolisoma originated in the late Miocene and diversification within the E. tenuirostre/remotum complex began in the Pleistocene. Within the North Melanesian and North Wallacean archipelagos, which have experienced several waves of diversification, we find significant patterns of genetic isolation by distance, but not within the Australo-Papuan ‘mainland’, which was recently back-colonised from these archipelagos. Based on the phylogeny, we suggest several taxonomic changes. We also discuss evidence of taxon cycles within Edolisoma based on correlations of species age, elevational ranges and dispersal ability.

Main conclusions: The biogeographical history and patterns of differentiation between phylogroups within E. tenuirostre support the importance of barriers to gene flow in island systems. Examples of both recent genetic exchange across significant sea barriers and differentiation across much smaller water gaps suggest complex dispersal and diversification dynamics. The capacity for dispersal away from islands, and gradual shifts in dispersal ability in relation to the geographical setting, is supported as important factors in generating a ‘great speciator'.

Link to the full study + maps: http://macroecointern.dk/pdf-reprints/P ... B_2018.pdf]]>
<![CDATA[South Pacific Birds :: eBird taxonomy update 2017 - South Pacific :: Author Michael Szabo]]> 2018-04-20T12:09:54+12:00 2018-04-20T12:09:54+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=7708&p=36719#p36719 https://ebird.org/news/taxonomy-update-for-2017/]]> https://ebird.org/news/taxonomy-update-for-2017/]]> <![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Re: Whale Shark sightings, Bay of Islands :: Reply by Hypno]]> 2018-04-01T21:48:03+12:00 2018-04-01T21:48:03+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=7624&p=36544#p36544 <![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Re: Papamoa/Tauranga - Blue Moon/Painted Lady butterfly invasion :: Reply by Olwen]]> 2018-04-02T21:41:40+12:00 2018-04-02T21:41:40+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=3535&p=36564#p36564 <![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Re: Papamoa/Tauranga - Blue Moon/Painted Lady butterfly invasion :: Reply by David Riddell]]> 2018-04-03T07:52:45+12:00 2018-04-03T07:52:45+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=3535&p=36567#p36567 https://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/102 ... golden-bay]]> https://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/102 ... golden-bay]]> <![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Whale Shark sighting, Bay of Plenty :: Author Michael Szabo]]> 2018-04-04T10:45:11+12:00 2018-04-04T10:45:11+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=7684&p=36584#p36584 http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/artic ... ref=NZH_fb]]> http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/artic ... ref=NZH_fb]]> <![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Subantarctic fur seals on Rangatira Island, Chatham Islands :: Author Colin Miskelly]]> 2018-04-06T18:56:18+12:00 2018-04-06T18:56:18+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=7686&p=36606#p36606 Arctocephalus tropicalis were seen on Rangatira (South East) Island in the Chatham Islands last month, one at West Landing on 20 March and one at East Clears on 24 March (images below).

This species breeds in the southern Indian and Atlantic Oceans (on Ile Amsterdam, St Paul, Prince Edward, Crozet, Gough and Tristan da Cunha Islands), with a few at Macquarie Island (where they hybridise with Antarctic fur seals A. gazella and New Zealand fur seals A. forsteri). The largest populations are on Gough Island (63%), Prince Edward Islands (including Marion Island) (25%) and Ile Amsterdam (11%), with less than 1% of the population shared at other sites. It has been recorded vagrant in New Zealand since at least 1977 (Snares Islands) and 1978 (Antipodes Island), with more recent records from the two main islands.

The first record that I am aware of from Rangatira was March 1996, and the hut log books record sightings (mainly of bulls) in Feb 2003, Apr 2003, Dec 2003, Feb 2008 (at least 2), Sep 2010 (female & pup), Nov 2012, Oct 2013, Sep 2016, Apr 2017 (male + female) and Oct 2017 (2 or 3).

Cheers
Colin

Attachments



West landing A. tropicalis.jpg (159.95 KiB)



East Clears A. tropicalis.jpg (166.82 KiB)


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Arctocephalus tropicalis were seen on Rangatira (South East) Island in the Chatham Islands last month, one at West Landing on 20 March and one at East Clears on 24 March (images below).

This species breeds in the southern Indian and Atlantic Oceans (on Ile Amsterdam, St Paul, Prince Edward, Crozet, Gough and Tristan da Cunha Islands), with a few at Macquarie Island (where they hybridise with Antarctic fur seals A. gazella and New Zealand fur seals A. forsteri). The largest populations are on Gough Island (63%), Prince Edward Islands (including Marion Island) (25%) and Ile Amsterdam (11%), with less than 1% of the population shared at other sites. It has been recorded vagrant in New Zealand since at least 1977 (Snares Islands) and 1978 (Antipodes Island), with more recent records from the two main islands.

The first record that I am aware of from Rangatira was March 1996, and the hut log books record sightings (mainly of bulls) in Feb 2003, Apr 2003, Dec 2003, Feb 2008 (at least 2), Sep 2010 (female & pup), Nov 2012, Oct 2013, Sep 2016, Apr 2017 (male + female) and Oct 2017 (2 or 3).

Cheers
Colin

Attachments



West landing A. tropicalis.jpg (159.95 KiB)



East Clears A. tropicalis.jpg (166.82 KiB)


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<![CDATA[Events :: The Great Hihi Sperm Race (seriously) :: Author Peter Frost]]> 2018-04-02T14:07:20+12:00 2018-04-02T14:07:20+12:00 http://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7675&p=36551#p36551 GHSR_postcard.jpg
Here is one for those of you who like a flutter (an appropriate term for birders).

Helen Taylor at the University of Otago has been studying hihi sperm to determine if there are any issues with infertility in male hihi as a result of the species’ overall small population size (~3500 individuals) and potential inbreeding among birds at the few sites sites where the species has been re-established. Two of the potential indicators are a higher-than-normal incidence of deformed sperm and slow-swimming sperm.

Over the 2017/18 breeding season, Helen collected sperm from 128 male hihi across four sites (Hauturu/Little Barrier Island, the original source population; Tiritiri Matangi, the first of the re-established populations and the source of birds for most subsequent translocations; Zealandia; and Bushy Park). Among other things, she measured the swimming speed of each male’s sperm. During this process, she and her colleagues came up with the idea of betting on which individual has the fastest sperm. They decided to set up a website where people can bet on the answer as a way of raising funds for hihi conservation. (All provisions for this initiative have been cleared with the relevant regulatory authorities.)

The mechanism is simple: go to http://www.hihispermrace.nz and pay $10 to bet on whichever bird you think will have the fastest sperm. You can bet on as many birds as you like, as often as you like. All the money goes to hihi conservation (see http://www.hihiconservation.com/, the website of the Hihi Recovery Group). Whoever selects the bird that Helen’s analyses show has the fastest sperm will win one of a number of donated prizes:
    • Family passes on 360 Discovery Ferries to Tiritiri Matangi Island, Auckland
    • Family passes to ZEALANDIA ecosanctuary, Wellington
    • Family tour packages for Sanctuary Mountain Maungatautari, Pukeatua
    • Cases of Hihi Wines
    • Hihi t-shirts from Tumbleweed Tees
    • Honey from Rotokare Scenic Reserve's own hives
    • Sets of native bird art cards from Bushy Park Sanctuary, Whanganui
Betting closes at midnight on Sunday 22nd April NZ time.

Hihi are extremely reliant on conservation actions: supplementary feeding, nest boxes and other forms of intensive management at most sites, as well as regular monitoring. This makes them an expensive species to conserve. The Hihi Recovery Group would like to involve as many people as possible---placing bets and spreading the word---so any publicity that you can give to this initiative would be greatly appreciated, including on Facebook and other social media. Many thanks and good luck.

Peter Frost

Attachments



GHSR_postcard.jpg (374.04 KiB)


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GHSR_postcard.jpg
Here is one for those of you who like a flutter (an appropriate term for birders).

Helen Taylor at the University of Otago has been studying hihi sperm to determine if there are any issues with infertility in male hihi as a result of the species’ overall small population size (~3500 individuals) and potential inbreeding among birds at the few sites sites where the species has been re-established. Two of the potential indicators are a higher-than-normal incidence of deformed sperm and slow-swimming sperm.

Over the 2017/18 breeding season, Helen collected sperm from 128 male hihi across four sites (Hauturu/Little Barrier Island, the original source population; Tiritiri Matangi, the first of the re-established populations and the source of birds for most subsequent translocations; Zealandia; and Bushy Park). Among other things, she measured the swimming speed of each male’s sperm. During this process, she and her colleagues came up with the idea of betting on which individual has the fastest sperm. They decided to set up a website where people can bet on the answer as a way of raising funds for hihi conservation. (All provisions for this initiative have been cleared with the relevant regulatory authorities.)

The mechanism is simple: go to http://www.hihispermrace.nz and pay $10 to bet on whichever bird you think will have the fastest sperm. You can bet on as many birds as you like, as often as you like. All the money goes to hihi conservation (see http://www.hihiconservation.com/, the website of the Hihi Recovery Group). Whoever selects the bird that Helen’s analyses show has the fastest sperm will win one of a number of donated prizes:
    • Family passes on 360 Discovery Ferries to Tiritiri Matangi Island, Auckland
    • Family passes to ZEALANDIA ecosanctuary, Wellington
    • Family tour packages for Sanctuary Mountain Maungatautari, Pukeatua
    • Cases of Hihi Wines
    • Hihi t-shirts from Tumbleweed Tees
    • Honey from Rotokare Scenic Reserve's own hives
    • Sets of native bird art cards from Bushy Park Sanctuary, Whanganui
Betting closes at midnight on Sunday 22nd April NZ time.

Hihi are extremely reliant on conservation actions: supplementary feeding, nest boxes and other forms of intensive management at most sites, as well as regular monitoring. This makes them an expensive species to conserve. The Hihi Recovery Group would like to involve as many people as possible---placing bets and spreading the word---so any publicity that you can give to this initiative would be greatly appreciated, including on Facebook and other social media. Many thanks and good luck.

Peter Frost

Attachments



GHSR_postcard.jpg (374.04 KiB)


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