Is the thylacine really extinct?

Discuss natural history subjects not strictly related to birds. Reports of interesting mammal, reptile, and invertebrate sightings are welcome.
User avatar
Neil Fitzgerald
Site Admin
Posts: 3077
Joined: Mon May 18, 2009 10:20 am
Location: Hamilton, New Zealand
Contact:

Is the thylacine really extinct?

Postby Neil Fitzgerald » Mon Mar 27, 2017 9:11 pm

Seems like a stretch, but it would be amazing if the Tasmanian tiger was still alive. Apparently there have been some credible sightings.
https://uk.news.yahoo.com/scientists-hu ... 49399.html
User avatar
David Riddell
Posts: 651
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2009 3:46 pm

Re: Is the thylacine really extinct?

Postby David Riddell » Wed Mar 29, 2017 10:04 am

Cape York (north-east Australian mainland) seems a strange place for a "Tasmanian" tiger to turn up, but there have been quite a few mainland thylacine reports over the years. I remember a photo from back in the 1980s from Western Australia, though the provenance of that was rather dubious - see http://www.naturalworlds.org/thylacine/ ... ings_3.htm. There's quite an interesting one from Adelaide, with some poor quality video, at https://www.google.co.nz/url?sa=t&rct=j ... Go&cad=rja - the article talks about more footage to come from the Nannup area of Western Australia, but I can't find any subsequent mention of that. Nannup is apparently a hotspot for thylacine sightings however. There's a good review of thylacine mainland sightings at http://www.naturalworlds.org/thylacine/ ... ings_1.htm, and Tasmanian sightings at http://www.naturalworlds.org/thylacine/ ... ivor_1.htm. There's a paper on Western Australia sightings at https://www.dpaw.wa.gov.au/images/docum ... les/90.pdf. I'm not sure what to make of these - some look like hoaxes (e.g. there's a CGI thylacine from the film The Hunter presented as a sighting on YouTube) or misidentifications, but some seem credible. I'll reserve judgement at this stage, but would love to see its continued survival confirmed by actual physical evidence.

Return to “Other Natural History”