<![CDATA[BirdingNZ.net]]> https://www.birdingnz.net/forum 2018-10-22T18:26:47+13:00 Smartfeed Extension for phpBB 3.1 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Dabchick from Floating hide. :: Author Bill F Cash]]> 2018-09-26T16:46:44+12:00 2018-09-26T16:46:44+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7949&p=37902#p37902 Below is hide with a dabchick in the foreground.
A couple of things I think he has flippers on and paddles it that way.
Plus that is a rather expensive lenses poking out the front, even though my camera is very much cheaper I think I will remain on drylands.
Oh and the road is immediately behind him, only the odd person noted this strange object floating in the water, most just drove past.
Bill

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Below is hide with a dabchick in the foreground.
A couple of things I think he has flippers on and paddles it that way.
Plus that is a rather expensive lenses poking out the front, even though my camera is very much cheaper I think I will remain on drylands.
Oh and the road is immediately behind him, only the odd person noted this strange object floating in the water, most just drove past.
Bill

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<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Nesting Swallows :: Author flossiepip]]> 2018-09-28T11:43:51+12:00 2018-09-28T11:43:51+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7951&p=37912#p37912 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Unusual bird watching locations :: Author zarkov]]> 2018-09-28T16:05:04+12:00 2018-09-28T16:05:04+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7954&p=37914#p37914
Pictured are only two examples of many species observed in this ideal situation on a very hot day.

There was a band, bistro and even the Aussies were fairly well behaved.

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Pictured are only two examples of many species observed in this ideal situation on a very hot day.

There was a band, bistro and even the Aussies were fairly well behaved.

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<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Kleptoparasitism by Kingfisher versus Song Thrush :: Author Ian McLean]]> 2018-10-05T12:08:07+13:00 2018-10-05T12:08:07+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7959&p=37965#p37965 Yesterday morning, whilst waiting for the Britomart train at Sunnyvale Railway Station in West Auckland, I noted a Kingfisher perched on one of the overhead electric cables. The Kingfisher was being mobbed by a Song Thrush with loud alarm calls & much wing flapping. Whilst this was happening, another Song Thrush appeared carrying an earthworm & flew down to the side of the rail tracks & attempted to feed a large & begging Song Thrush fledgling. Next the perched Kingfisher flew down to the Song Thrush fledgling & attempted to steal the earthworm now followed by two protesting adult Song Thrushes. By now there was much alarm calling & a second Kingfisher appeared, but I was unable to see whether the Kingfishers had snatched the earthworm from the Song Thrush fledgling. Unfortunately, my train then arrived & I was unable to observe any further action.
Just wondering whether anyone else has seen any similar interactions ?
It appeared that the Kingfishers intent was Kleptoparasitism rather than attempted predation of the Song Thrush fledgling, as the Song Thrush fledgling appeared larger than the Kingfisher !
Cheers
Ian]]>
Yesterday morning, whilst waiting for the Britomart train at Sunnyvale Railway Station in West Auckland, I noted a Kingfisher perched on one of the overhead electric cables. The Kingfisher was being mobbed by a Song Thrush with loud alarm calls & much wing flapping. Whilst this was happening, another Song Thrush appeared carrying an earthworm & flew down to the side of the rail tracks & attempted to feed a large & begging Song Thrush fledgling. Next the perched Kingfisher flew down to the Song Thrush fledgling & attempted to steal the earthworm now followed by two protesting adult Song Thrushes. By now there was much alarm calling & a second Kingfisher appeared, but I was unable to see whether the Kingfishers had snatched the earthworm from the Song Thrush fledgling. Unfortunately, my train then arrived & I was unable to observe any further action.
Just wondering whether anyone else has seen any similar interactions ?
It appeared that the Kingfishers intent was Kleptoparasitism rather than attempted predation of the Song Thrush fledgling, as the Song Thrush fledgling appeared larger than the Kingfisher !
Cheers
Ian]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Long tailed cuckoo locations :: Author Ben Volpicelli]]> 2018-09-28T12:17:40+12:00 2018-09-28T12:17:40+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7952&p=37913#p37913
Thanks
Ben!]]>

Thanks
Ben!]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Long tailed cuckoo locations :: Reply by Colin Miskelly]]> 2018-09-29T08:55:09+12:00 2018-09-29T08:55:09+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7952&p=37919#p37919
You have touched on an interesting question - namely why long-tailed cuckoos aren't breeding in Zealandia (or on Tiritiri Matangi, or any of the ten or so other sites that whiteheads have been successfully translocated to). The cuckoos can and do (occasionally) reach these sites, and so individual cuckoos would discover that they are full of potential hosts. But there is not yet a single record of long-tailed cuckoos breeding at a host translocation site. They must be incredibly philopatric to their natal sites, which is quite extraordinary for such an ultra-long distance migrant. It will be a conservation milestone achieved when long-tailed cuckoos are found breeding at a restoration site.

The situation is more complex in the South Island, where most mohua release sites had resident brown creeper, and so long-tailed cuckoos were already present. But another unknown with long-tailed cuckoos is whether they have separate gentes that specialise in different hosts. Will a 'brown creeper' cuckoo lay in a mohua nest? with the added complication that mohua are hole-nesters (cf. brown creepers and whiteheads having open cup nests), and so laying an egg in a mohua nest requires specialised behaviour on the part of the female cuckoo (and a thick-shelled egg).

Cheers
Colin]]>

You have touched on an interesting question - namely why long-tailed cuckoos aren't breeding in Zealandia (or on Tiritiri Matangi, or any of the ten or so other sites that whiteheads have been successfully translocated to). The cuckoos can and do (occasionally) reach these sites, and so individual cuckoos would discover that they are full of potential hosts. But there is not yet a single record of long-tailed cuckoos breeding at a host translocation site. They must be incredibly philopatric to their natal sites, which is quite extraordinary for such an ultra-long distance migrant. It will be a conservation milestone achieved when long-tailed cuckoos are found breeding at a restoration site.

The situation is more complex in the South Island, where most mohua release sites had resident brown creeper, and so long-tailed cuckoos were already present. But another unknown with long-tailed cuckoos is whether they have separate gentes that specialise in different hosts. Will a 'brown creeper' cuckoo lay in a mohua nest? with the added complication that mohua are hole-nesters (cf. brown creepers and whiteheads having open cup nests), and so laying an egg in a mohua nest requires specialised behaviour on the part of the female cuckoo (and a thick-shelled egg).

Cheers
Colin]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Long tailed cuckoo locations :: Reply by Ben Volpicelli]]> 2018-09-29T09:57:36+12:00 2018-09-29T09:57:36+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7952&p=37920#p37920
Cheers
Ben]]>

Cheers
Ben]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Long tailed cuckoo locations :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-09-29T13:23:48+12:00 2018-09-29T13:23:48+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7952&p=37924#p37924 Hard to spot, semi nocturnal and not much research to go on!
Translocation of some eggs from kapitI to a host (volunteer of course...) in Zealand is???
Locations in Wellington- heard them at holdsworth and otaki forks and kapit Island

Cheers Jim]]>
Hard to spot, semi nocturnal and not much research to go on!
Translocation of some eggs from kapitI to a host (volunteer of course...) in Zealand is???
Locations in Wellington- heard them at holdsworth and otaki forks and kapit Island

Cheers Jim]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Long tailed cuckoo locations :: Reply by Ben Volpicelli]]> 2018-09-29T15:01:05+12:00 2018-09-29T15:01:05+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7952&p=37925#p37925 Ben]]> Ben]]> <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Long tailed cuckoo locations :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-09-29T16:09:53+12:00 2018-09-29T16:09:53+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7952&p=37926#p37926 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Long tailed cuckoo locations :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-09-29T19:40:42+12:00 2018-09-29T19:40:42+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7952&p=37928#p37928 Cheers Jim]]> Cheers Jim]]> <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Long tailed cuckoo locations :: Reply by Nikki McArthur]]> 2018-09-30T14:53:43+13:00 2018-09-30T14:53:43+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7952&p=37932#p37932
LTCs are fairly conspicuous at higher altitudes on GBI each summer, and calling rates seem fairly uniform throughout this summer, giving me the impression that these birds are resident rather than passing through. But...whiteheads aren't present on GBI. So, are these LTC parasitising another species on GBI (and if so, what?), or have they not figured out that there are no local whitehead nests to find?]]>

LTCs are fairly conspicuous at higher altitudes on GBI each summer, and calling rates seem fairly uniform throughout this summer, giving me the impression that these birds are resident rather than passing through. But...whiteheads aren't present on GBI. So, are these LTC parasitising another species on GBI (and if so, what?), or have they not figured out that there are no local whitehead nests to find?]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Long tailed cuckoo locations :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-09-30T16:20:03+13:00 2018-09-30T16:20:03+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7952&p=37933#p37933 I guess they could use hosts on say LBI then just migrate out to GBI to feed?
Just shows how little anyone knows about these birds.
Cheers Jim]]>
I guess they could use hosts on say LBI then just migrate out to GBI to feed?
Just shows how little anyone knows about these birds.
Cheers Jim]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Long tailed cuckoo locations :: Reply by Nikki McArthur]]> 2018-09-30T20:32:07+13:00 2018-09-30T20:32:07+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7952&p=37934#p37934
So, whiteheads probably died out on GBI well beyond a LTC's lifespan-ago, which points to a possibility that this local population has found an alternate host, or the birds are just 'visiting' as you say Jim. If the birds are highly philopatric to their natal sites, then its perhaps unlikely that GBI is acting as a habitat trap (i.e. birds are being attracted to suitable forest habitat, but not figuring out that their host is absent), as you'd assume their 'homing' instinct would override the attractiveness of any forest habitat they happen to pass through, or over.

Another thought I had about Colin's observation that LTCs are absent from sites to which whiteheads have been re-introduced: If they are highly philopatric, then it would be interesting to try a LTC translocation - by harvesting LTC eggs from parasitised nests at a mainland source site and fostering them into whitehead nests at the reintroduction site. It would be fiendishly difficult to do, but a great challenge! Or...an alternative option might be to set up speakers to broadcast LTC calls to try to entice passage birds in.... Or maybe just wait for them to find the place themselves...]]>

So, whiteheads probably died out on GBI well beyond a LTC's lifespan-ago, which points to a possibility that this local population has found an alternate host, or the birds are just 'visiting' as you say Jim. If the birds are highly philopatric to their natal sites, then its perhaps unlikely that GBI is acting as a habitat trap (i.e. birds are being attracted to suitable forest habitat, but not figuring out that their host is absent), as you'd assume their 'homing' instinct would override the attractiveness of any forest habitat they happen to pass through, or over.

Another thought I had about Colin's observation that LTCs are absent from sites to which whiteheads have been re-introduced: If they are highly philopatric, then it would be interesting to try a LTC translocation - by harvesting LTC eggs from parasitised nests at a mainland source site and fostering them into whitehead nests at the reintroduction site. It would be fiendishly difficult to do, but a great challenge! Or...an alternative option might be to set up speakers to broadcast LTC calls to try to entice passage birds in.... Or maybe just wait for them to find the place themselves...]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Long tailed cuckoo locations :: Reply by Michael Szabo]]> 2018-10-02T12:30:39+13:00 2018-10-02T12:30:39+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7952&p=37946#p37946 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Long tailed cuckoo locations :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-10-02T14:08:17+13:00 2018-10-02T14:08:17+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7952&p=37948#p37948 Monitor 20-30 whitehead nests with cameras and use bird recognition software to identify LTC visits.
Would also give a good indication of the level of parasitism
I don't know if there is any research (I doubt it) on whether there is a specific window of time as to when LTC eggs have to be introduced to Whitehard nests.
I imagine a first step would be to band or fit tracking devices to confirm that LTC do in fact return to their place of birth...
I think somewhere like Kapiti or Mt Bruce would be an easier option than LBI....
All in all an expensive exercise....!

cheers
Jim]]>
Monitor 20-30 whitehead nests with cameras and use bird recognition software to identify LTC visits.
Would also give a good indication of the level of parasitism
I don't know if there is any research (I doubt it) on whether there is a specific window of time as to when LTC eggs have to be introduced to Whitehard nests.
I imagine a first step would be to band or fit tracking devices to confirm that LTC do in fact return to their place of birth...
I think somewhere like Kapiti or Mt Bruce would be an easier option than LBI....
All in all an expensive exercise....!

cheers
Jim]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Long tailed cuckoo locations :: Reply by Nikki McArthur]]> 2018-10-03T12:47:46+13:00 2018-10-03T12:47:46+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7952&p=37955#p37955 https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/cuckoo-9781408856567/), which was probably the source of inspiration behind my earlier post.

In this book the author describes a number of clever tricks that he'd developed to predict where and when female cuckoos would parasitise host nests - getting to the point where he could predict both the nest in which a particular cuckoo would lay in, and on what day. Admittedly though, this work was carried out in a fen wetland (host nests were easily accessible) and a lot more is known about the breeding biology of the European cuckoo, but nonetheless they showed it was possible, albeit with a lot of time and perseverance!]]>
https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/cuckoo-9781408856567/), which was probably the source of inspiration behind my earlier post.

In this book the author describes a number of clever tricks that he'd developed to predict where and when female cuckoos would parasitise host nests - getting to the point where he could predict both the nest in which a particular cuckoo would lay in, and on what day. Admittedly though, this work was carried out in a fen wetland (host nests were easily accessible) and a lot more is known about the breeding biology of the European cuckoo, but nonetheless they showed it was possible, albeit with a lot of time and perseverance!]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Long tailed cuckoo locations :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-10-04T11:02:41+13:00 2018-10-04T11:02:41+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7952&p=37956#p37956
cheers
Jim]]>

cheers
Jim]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Long tailed cuckoo locations :: Reply by ledzep]]> 2018-10-05T20:46:33+13:00 2018-10-05T20:46:33+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7952&p=37971#p37971 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Long tailed cuckoo locations :: Reply by Ben Volpicelli]]> 2018-10-06T13:08:49+13:00 2018-10-06T13:08:49+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7952&p=37973#p37973 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Long tailed cuckoo locations :: Reply by Roblyn]]> 2018-10-06T13:25:22+13:00 2018-10-06T13:25:22+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7952&p=37974#p37974 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Long tailed cuckoo locations :: Reply by Nikki McArthur]]> 2018-10-09T16:05:52+13:00 2018-10-09T16:05:52+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7952&p=38008#p38008 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Female Tui targeting spiders :: Author Weka1]]> 2018-10-04T11:31:52+13:00 2018-10-04T11:31:52+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7957&p=37957#p37957 I assume the extra nutrients may help with breeding/egg laying and wonder if this behaviour has been recorded before.

Likewise it is more noticeable at this time of year that females and less often males are working across the top of the kanuka canopy, and other trees where they are through the canopy, and appear to be engaged in feeding behaviour. They are not getting nectar nor nesting material, but are methodically searching through the canopy top.

We have in past years had two attempts by tui to nest within two metres of our house. Both nesting attempts have been abandoned and a nest eventually built further away from the house. Maybe we were too noisy, but it did give a unique opportunity to observe nest building from the comfort of our house 'hide'.]]>
I assume the extra nutrients may help with breeding/egg laying and wonder if this behaviour has been recorded before.

Likewise it is more noticeable at this time of year that females and less often males are working across the top of the kanuka canopy, and other trees where they are through the canopy, and appear to be engaged in feeding behaviour. They are not getting nectar nor nesting material, but are methodically searching through the canopy top.

We have in past years had two attempts by tui to nest within two metres of our house. Both nesting attempts have been abandoned and a nest eventually built further away from the house. Maybe we were too noisy, but it did give a unique opportunity to observe nest building from the comfort of our house 'hide'.]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Female Tui targeting spiders :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-10-04T22:12:39+13:00 2018-10-04T22:12:39+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7957&p=37959#p37959 Somehow it managed to cling to the narrow struts, looking on the underside of the rail and making its way a meter or two along - I could see it clearly caught a couple of things.


cheers
Jim]]>
Somehow it managed to cling to the narrow struts, looking on the underside of the rail and making its way a meter or two along - I could see it clearly caught a couple of things.


cheers
Jim]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Female Tui targeting spiders :: Reply by Olwen]]> 2018-10-09T20:42:07+13:00 2018-10-09T20:42:07+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7957&p=38009#p38009 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Birdwatching on the South Island and Chatham Island :: Author matsbrage@gmail.com]]> 2018-10-16T03:18:47+13:00 2018-10-16T03:18:47+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7974&p=38058#p38058
I would greatly appreciate a little help on where to go for birding in NZ South Island and Chatham Island.

I will be arriving shortly after christmas and leaving on the 11th of January.

I am a rather experienced birder, but have also travel companions that are beginners, so I am looking for good spots on the South Island (mainly from Dunedin and north) and also had the idea to bring the whole bunch to go to Chatham Island (if that make sense).

It was more than 30 yrs back when I last visited NZ so I really need to freshen up my knowledge on where to go.

Thank in advance fr your input and suggestions

Mats

(from Sweden)]]>

I would greatly appreciate a little help on where to go for birding in NZ South Island and Chatham Island.

I will be arriving shortly after christmas and leaving on the 11th of January.

I am a rather experienced birder, but have also travel companions that are beginners, so I am looking for good spots on the South Island (mainly from Dunedin and north) and also had the idea to bring the whole bunch to go to Chatham Island (if that make sense).

It was more than 30 yrs back when I last visited NZ so I really need to freshen up my knowledge on where to go.

Thank in advance fr your input and suggestions

Mats

(from Sweden)]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Is this a Domestic Mallard ? :: Reply by TheBirderman]]> 2018-10-11T19:32:37+13:00 2018-10-11T19:32:37+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=6415&p=38037#p38037 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Is this a Domestic Mallard ? :: Reply by Liam Ballard]]> 2018-10-11T21:02:42+13:00 2018-10-11T21:02:42+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=6415&p=38040#p38040 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Is this a Domestic Mallard ? :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-10-12T23:16:15+13:00 2018-10-12T23:16:15+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=6415&p=38044#p38044
Liam Ballard wrote:Cannot procreate, Clinton? Maybe it is a different breed, but there is a biggish brown/black domestic duck with a bib near my house with three large ducklings - two of which are ordinary Greylard colouration and one just like its mother.
]]>

Liam Ballard wrote:Cannot procreate, Clinton? Maybe it is a different breed, but there is a biggish brown/black domestic duck with a bib near my house with three large ducklings - two of which are ordinary Greylard colouration and one just like its mother.
]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Is this a Domestic Mallard ? :: Reply by Liam Ballard]]> 2018-10-14T08:51:10+13:00 2018-10-14T08:51:10+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=6415&p=38048#p38048 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Is this a Domestic Mallard ? :: Reply by les]]> 2018-10-15T22:10:09+13:00 2018-10-15T22:10:09+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=6415&p=38057#p38057 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Is this a Domestic Mallard ? :: Reply by Raewyn]]> 2018-10-16T19:50:48+13:00 2018-10-16T19:50:48+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=6415&p=38065#p38065

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<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Who is using white alphanumeric flags on knots?? :: Author andrewcrossland]]> 2018-10-06T14:09:40+13:00 2018-10-06T14:09:40+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7963&p=37977#p37977 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Who is using white alphanumeric flags on knots?? :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-10-06T14:24:35+13:00 2018-10-06T14:24:35+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7963&p=37978#p37978 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Who is using white alphanumeric flags on knots?? :: Reply by GrahameNZ]]> 2018-10-07T09:20:04+13:00 2018-10-07T09:20:04+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7963&p=37984#p37984 While not answering your question there is a pic of a Red Knot with a white flag on it's right tibia with 3 letters (BJB) in a paper on R Knot migration on the East Asian Australian flyway.
The image is dated March 2010.
http://globalflywaynetwork.com.au/wp-co ... d-Knot.pdf]]>
While not answering your question there is a pic of a Red Knot with a white flag on it's right tibia with 3 letters (BJB) in a paper on R Knot migration on the East Asian Australian flyway.
The image is dated March 2010.
http://globalflywaynetwork.com.au/wp-co ... d-Knot.pdf]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Who is using white alphanumeric flags on knots?? :: Reply by GrahameNZ]]> 2018-10-07T09:32:25+13:00 2018-10-07T09:32:25+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7963&p=37985#p37985 "Most of the banding and travel flag placement is done in Argentina on their wintering grounds (orange flags), in the Delaware Bay, a prime stop-over on their migration north (lime green flags), and in Canada on their breeding grounds (white flags). "
From
https://stlucieaudubon.org/hartBeat/hb2 ... 5flag.html
The birds shown in the pics have alphanumeric flags.
Have fun]]>
"Most of the banding and travel flag placement is done in Argentina on their wintering grounds (orange flags), in the Delaware Bay, a prime stop-over on their migration north (lime green flags), and in Canada on their breeding grounds (white flags). "
From
https://stlucieaudubon.org/hartBeat/hb2 ... 5flag.html
The birds shown in the pics have alphanumeric flags.
Have fun]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Who is using white alphanumeric flags on knots?? :: Reply by gillianv]]> 2018-10-07T20:32:22+13:00 2018-10-07T20:32:22+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7963&p=37990#p37990 We do - white flags with 3 black letters. Another option could be Chongming Dao if it’s lost the black flag. Their white flags are often squarer than ours - ours tend to long and narrow.
Cheers]]>
We do - white flags with 3 black letters. Another option could be Chongming Dao if it’s lost the black flag. Their white flags are often squarer than ours - ours tend to long and narrow.
Cheers]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Who is using white alphanumeric flags on knots?? :: Reply by Paul Gibson]]> 2018-10-08T09:24:59+13:00 2018-10-08T09:24:59+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7963&p=37995#p37995
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<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Who is using white alphanumeric flags on knots?? :: Reply by philbattley]]> 2018-10-08T10:24:17+13:00 2018-10-08T10:24:17+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7963&p=37997#p37997 Phil]]> Phil]]> <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Who is using white alphanumeric flags on knots?? :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-10-09T00:36:45+13:00 2018-10-09T00:36:45+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7963&p=38001#p38001 20181001_090255.jpgHi guys. The shape of the flag was longish like the NZ ones. Yellow sea and NW Australian red knots have been seen in sumatra and numbers of red knot coming to sumatra is much greater now that it used to be. I've been a regular wader watcher in sumatra since 1994.
I've passed this information on to local wader researchers who hopefully may be able to visit the area and try to refine the bird - although it is quite a distance for them to travel. I'll also hp thru the 50 or so photos I took to see if I managed to photograph it by chance.
Cheers from the wilds of sumatra.
Ac
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20181001_090255.jpgHi guys. The shape of the flag was longish like the NZ ones. Yellow sea and NW Australian red knots have been seen in sumatra and numbers of red knot coming to sumatra is much greater now that it used to be. I've been a regular wader watcher in sumatra since 1994.
I've passed this information on to local wader researchers who hopefully may be able to visit the area and try to refine the bird - although it is quite a distance for them to travel. I'll also hp thru the 50 or so photos I took to see if I managed to photograph it by chance.
Cheers from the wilds of sumatra.
Ac
20181001_081602.jpg

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<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Who is using white alphanumeric flags on knots?? :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-10-09T00:48:53+13:00 2018-10-09T00:48:53+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7963&p=38002#p38002 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: Who is using white alphanumeric flags on knots?? :: Reply by David Melville]]> 2018-10-17T22:31:05+13:00 2018-10-17T22:31:05+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7963&p=38076#p38076 If the flag really is a combination of letters and a number on a WHITE (rather than faded YELLOW) flag it is probably from Chongming Dongtan Nature Reserve, Shanghai. However there should be a BLACK flag above the WHITE.
David]]>
If the flag really is a combination of letters and a number on a WHITE (rather than faded YELLOW) flag it is probably from Chongming Dongtan Nature Reserve, Shanghai. However there should be a BLACK flag above the WHITE.
David]]>
<![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: ID thoughts on this strange passerine at Akaroa? :: Reply by TheBirderman]]> 2018-10-11T19:31:03+13:00 2018-10-11T19:31:03+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7901&p=38036#p38036 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: ID thoughts on this strange passerine at Akaroa? :: Reply by AlanShaw]]> 2018-10-14T06:41:57+13:00 2018-10-14T06:41:57+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7901&p=38046#p38046 <![CDATA[General Birding Discussion :: Re: ID thoughts on this strange passerine at Akaroa? :: Reply by andrewcrossland]]> 2018-10-21T03:58:42+13:00 2018-10-21T03:58:42+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7901&p=38102#p38102 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: White headed Blackbird :: Reply by Jake]]> 2018-09-25T23:10:31+12:00 2018-09-25T23:10:31+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7927&p=37897#p37897 viewtopic.php?f=3&t=247&start=70

Just posted a pic on the 'white birds' thread of a similar boy... not as stunning as your guy, Paul!]]>
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=247&start=70

Just posted a pic on the 'white birds' thread of a similar boy... not as stunning as your guy, Paul!]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Jan 12--Hoary-headed Grebe at Elterwater :: Reply by Les Feasey]]> 2018-09-26T09:57:54+12:00 2018-09-26T09:57:54+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7477&p=37899#p37899

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: NZ Dabchick Breeding again Taylor Dam. :: Reply by Bill F Cash]]> 2018-09-24T17:18:59+12:00 2018-09-24T17:18:59+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7937&p=37882#p37882

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: NZ Dabchick Breeding again Taylor Dam. :: Reply by Mtn Breeze]]> 2018-09-24T18:13:37+12:00 2018-09-24T18:13:37+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7937&p=37888#p37888 Matt.

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Matt.

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: NZ Dabchick Breeding again Taylor Dam. :: Reply by Jake]]> 2018-09-25T23:01:42+12:00 2018-09-25T23:01:42+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7937&p=37895#p37895 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: NZ Dabchick Breeding again Taylor Dam. :: Reply by Bill F Cash]]> 2018-09-26T16:36:16+12:00 2018-09-26T16:36:16+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7937&p=37901#p37901 Jake next time you are in Blenheim give me a call. I may be mistaken but I think your folk live just around the corner from me.
As for Matt's photos from his floating hide I will post a photo in the General Section showing how it is done.
Bill.]]>
Jake next time you are in Blenheim give me a call. I may be mistaken but I think your folk live just around the corner from me.
As for Matt's photos from his floating hide I will post a photo in the General Section showing how it is done.
Bill.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Rarangi Beach seawatching :: Reply by Olwen]]> 2018-09-26T19:56:01+12:00 2018-09-26T19:56:01+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7942&p=37904#p37904 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Godwit arrivals :: Reply by Jan]]> 2018-09-28T11:42:03+12:00 2018-09-28T11:42:03+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7932&p=37911#p37911 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Spoonbills Lake Ellesmere :: Author Anncm]]> 2018-09-26T07:11:50+12:00 2018-09-26T07:11:50+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7948&p=37898#p37898 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Spoonbills Lake Ellesmere :: Reply by Jan]]> 2018-09-28T11:37:37+12:00 2018-09-28T11:37:37+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7948&p=37910#p37910 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Spoonbills Lake Ellesmere :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-09-28T18:20:09+12:00 2018-09-28T18:20:09+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7948&p=37916#p37916 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 18 Glossy Ibis, Wairau Lagoons :: Reply by Les Feasey]]> 2018-09-23T19:30:17+12:00 2018-09-23T19:30:17+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7936&p=37872#p37872 After looking at the photos at home, eighteen doesn't surprise me. Good work.
There were 2 Glossy Ibis on the island when I was there on 18 September, and I went back to the car to get the camera. Another 8 flew in as I set up. I wrote up an observation and posted it, then some 12 Glossy Ibis took off, circled, and landed. There were still at least 2 on the island, and some must have been were hidden in the vegetation. A great photo op.
Many of those that landed did so on the vegetation and became completely concealed as they worked their way in. There were also Cattle Egret, and the Royal Spoonbill put on quite a display in their breeding plumage. I'll update my eBird observation now I've had a look at the photos back at home.
Cheers,
Les

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After looking at the photos at home, eighteen doesn't surprise me. Good work.
There were 2 Glossy Ibis on the island when I was there on 18 September, and I went back to the car to get the camera. Another 8 flew in as I set up. I wrote up an observation and posted it, then some 12 Glossy Ibis took off, circled, and landed. There were still at least 2 on the island, and some must have been were hidden in the vegetation. A great photo op.
Many of those that landed did so on the vegetation and became completely concealed as they worked their way in. There were also Cattle Egret, and the Royal Spoonbill put on quite a display in their breeding plumage. I'll update my eBird observation now I've had a look at the photos back at home.
Cheers,
Les

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Wairau Lagoon Glossy Ibis
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Wairau Lagoon Glossy Ibis

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 18 Glossy Ibis, Wairau Lagoons :: Reply by Christopher]]> 2018-09-23T22:43:07+12:00 2018-09-23T22:43:07+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7936&p=37873#p37873 Thanks!

Chris]]>
Thanks!

Chris]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 18 Glossy Ibis, Wairau Lagoons :: Reply by Ian Southey]]> 2018-09-24T06:52:33+12:00 2018-09-24T06:52:33+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7936&p=37875#p37875
Native (or indigenous) just means that nobody picked them up and brought them here. Glossy Ibises arrived naturally under their own steam so they are, and have always been native. The interesting thing will be whether or not they continue to breed, increase and spread. In Australia I think they are more of a nomadic inland bird with White Ibises more likely to be seen in habitats like we have in New Zealand. Maybe that's why they like Marlborough.

Ian]]>

Native (or indigenous) just means that nobody picked them up and brought them here. Glossy Ibises arrived naturally under their own steam so they are, and have always been native. The interesting thing will be whether or not they continue to breed, increase and spread. In Australia I think they are more of a nomadic inland bird with White Ibises more likely to be seen in habitats like we have in New Zealand. Maybe that's why they like Marlborough.

Ian]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 18 Glossy Ibis, Wairau Lagoons :: Reply by fras444]]> 2018-09-24T07:21:43+12:00 2018-09-24T07:21:43+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7936&p=37876#p37876 I think Christopher was meaning, how many times a new arrival needs to breed for it to be classed as a native species.
Regarding the status. Are they breeding still?]]>
I think Christopher was meaning, how many times a new arrival needs to breed for it to be classed as a native species.
Regarding the status. Are they breeding still?]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 18 Glossy Ibis, Wairau Lagoons :: Reply by Ian Southey]]> 2018-09-24T09:48:03+12:00 2018-09-24T09:48:03+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7936&p=37877#p37877
Ian]]>

Ian]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 18 Glossy Ibis, Wairau Lagoons :: Reply by Nikki McArthur]]> 2018-09-24T11:27:21+12:00 2018-09-24T11:27:21+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7936&p=37878#p37878
https://www.doc.govt.nz/Documents/science-and-technical/nztcs19entire.pdf

Cheers,
Nikki]]>

https://www.doc.govt.nz/Documents/science-and-technical/nztcs19entire.pdf

Cheers,
Nikki]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 18 Glossy Ibis, Wairau Lagoons :: Reply by fras444]]> 2018-09-24T15:09:06+12:00 2018-09-24T18:43:08+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7936&p=37880#p37880 I find that this subject can either be as straight forward or as clear as mud.......

For example.. Some sources describe the bartailed gotwit as a "native migrant...." others just as a migrant.... Some sources only lable a species as native only if it's currently breeding, some sources don't lable a species as native even if it just started breeding and has been mentioned to have bred after time of writing and some sources continue to describe species as a native even though a pair bred but no longer breeds
The field guide to nz birds....I always thought the labeling was very straightforward.... Vagrant (a random occurrence), straggler (a migrant blown of course), uncommon visitor??? Not sure exactly what makes a bird an uncomon visitor different to a vagrant??? ( that was used to describe the nakeen kestral) then there is migrant and then you have native...

Any bird that naturally arrives be it a migrant bird or any of those labels above, is fully protected and is classed as native as long as the bird turned up naturally unassisted. But to be actually labeled a native species... I always thought that bird must have breed and continually be breeding successfully...
Then you go into subspeciesand then endemic...
That's what I have always understood anyway...

Then you have birds that have bred very recently such as the horay grebe and the wood duck. Are they classed as native straight away or do they have to breed for a number of years and become established before they are labeled native, particularly nz birdsonline

Anyway how are those glossy Isbis doing regarding breeding??? Did they breed this season]]>
I find that this subject can either be as straight forward or as clear as mud.......

For example.. Some sources describe the bartailed gotwit as a "native migrant...." others just as a migrant.... Some sources only lable a species as native only if it's currently breeding, some sources don't lable a species as native even if it just started breeding and has been mentioned to have bred after time of writing and some sources continue to describe species as a native even though a pair bred but no longer breeds
The field guide to nz birds....I always thought the labeling was very straightforward.... Vagrant (a random occurrence), straggler (a migrant blown of course), uncommon visitor??? Not sure exactly what makes a bird an uncomon visitor different to a vagrant??? ( that was used to describe the nakeen kestral) then there is migrant and then you have native...

Any bird that naturally arrives be it a migrant bird or any of those labels above, is fully protected and is classed as native as long as the bird turned up naturally unassisted. But to be actually labeled a native species... I always thought that bird must have breed and continually be breeding successfully...
Then you go into subspeciesand then endemic...
That's what I have always understood anyway...

Then you have birds that have bred very recently such as the horay grebe and the wood duck. Are they classed as native straight away or do they have to breed for a number of years and become established before they are labeled native, particularly nz birdsonline

Anyway how are those glossy Isbis doing regarding breeding??? Did they breed this season]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 18 Glossy Ibis, Wairau Lagoons :: Reply by fras444]]> 2018-09-24T18:11:36+12:00 2018-09-24T18:11:36+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7936&p=37887#p37887
Any species that arrives here on its own becomes protected as it is instantly classed as native...

SO GUYS..... When do you personally describe a recent arrival to be a true native species??


As a vagrant/straggler/visitor or an annual migrant Or....

If either, a pair That has... attempted to nest/laid a clutch such as the white-winged black terns in the south island. When a clutch is laid and a brood is successfully raised such as the Horay grebe, or when a huge clutch/number has been successfully been raised such as the Aussie wood ducks or. More than a couple of breeding successes such as the Glossy Ibis or when the species is all but established and the broods are also breeding such as the Barn owl?]]>

Any species that arrives here on its own becomes protected as it is instantly classed as native...

SO GUYS..... When do you personally describe a recent arrival to be a true native species??


As a vagrant/straggler/visitor or an annual migrant Or....

If either, a pair That has... attempted to nest/laid a clutch such as the white-winged black terns in the south island. When a clutch is laid and a brood is successfully raised such as the Horay grebe, or when a huge clutch/number has been successfully been raised such as the Aussie wood ducks or. More than a couple of breeding successes such as the Glossy Ibis or when the species is all but established and the broods are also breeding such as the Barn owl?]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 18 Glossy Ibis, Wairau Lagoons :: Reply by tim]]> 2018-09-24T20:19:55+12:00 2018-09-24T20:19:55+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7936&p=37889#p37889 It might be when the population increases somewhat then they are moved to the not threatened native ranking that sits with other colonisers like spur winged plover and white faced heron etc.

below is the pdf and the ibis is on page 19
https://www.doc.govt.nz/Documents/scien ... entire.pdf]]>
It might be when the population increases somewhat then they are moved to the not threatened native ranking that sits with other colonisers like spur winged plover and white faced heron etc.

below is the pdf and the ibis is on page 19
https://www.doc.govt.nz/Documents/scien ... entire.pdf]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 18 Glossy Ibis, Wairau Lagoons :: Reply by Ian Southey]]> 2018-09-24T20:50:28+12:00 2018-09-24T20:50:28+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7936&p=37890#p37890
There are labels for everything. Sometimes they are "or" categories like native/indigenous or introduced/exotic. Everything is either one or the other. A sub-category of native is "endemic" which might be what are calling "true native".

A totally independent set of labels ("and"), but only applying to native birds, vagrant and straggler are loose terms sliding from rare to regular occurrence. Some of them might be best thought of as rare migrants, others are Aussie nomads responding to floods and droughts seabirds get pushed out of range by El Nino or La Nina conditions but there is some pattern behind most of them.

Is this making sense yet?

Ian]]>

There are labels for everything. Sometimes they are "or" categories like native/indigenous or introduced/exotic. Everything is either one or the other. A sub-category of native is "endemic" which might be what are calling "true native".

A totally independent set of labels ("and"), but only applying to native birds, vagrant and straggler are loose terms sliding from rare to regular occurrence. Some of them might be best thought of as rare migrants, others are Aussie nomads responding to floods and droughts seabirds get pushed out of range by El Nino or La Nina conditions but there is some pattern behind most of them.

Is this making sense yet?

Ian]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 18 Glossy Ibis, Wairau Lagoons :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-09-25T09:58:19+12:00 2018-09-25T09:58:19+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7936&p=37891#p37891 You can download the full 2008 revision of the manual from the DOC website: NZ Threat Classification System manual 2008. By Andrew J. Townsend, Peter J. de Lange, Clinton A.J. Duffy, Colin M. Miskelly, Janice Molloy and David A. Norton.
This chart from the manual shows where Migrant and Vagrant sit under Native. And yes, by default any such birds are fully protected under NZ law.

NZTCS.jpg


From page 25 the manual clarifies the categories for non-resident native species alive in the wild.
Migrant: Taxa that predictably and cyclically visit New Zealand as part of their normal life cycle (a minimum of 15 individuals known or presumed to visit per year), but do not breed here.
Vagrant: Taxa that are found unexpectedly in New Zealand and whose presence in this region is naturally transitory, or migratory species with fewer than 15 individuals known or presumed to visit per year.
Coloniser: Taxa that otherwise trigger ‘Threatened’ categories because of small population size, but have arrived in New Zealand without direct or indirect help from humans and have been successfully reproducing in the wild since 1950.

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Revised (2007) structure of the New Zealand Threat Classification System. From Townsend et al. 2008.
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Revised (2007) structure of the New Zealand Threat Classification System. From Townsend et al. 2008.

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You can download the full 2008 revision of the manual from the DOC website: NZ Threat Classification System manual 2008. By Andrew J. Townsend, Peter J. de Lange, Clinton A.J. Duffy, Colin M. Miskelly, Janice Molloy and David A. Norton.
This chart from the manual shows where Migrant and Vagrant sit under Native. And yes, by default any such birds are fully protected under NZ law.

NZTCS.jpg


From page 25 the manual clarifies the categories for non-resident native species alive in the wild.
Migrant: Taxa that predictably and cyclically visit New Zealand as part of their normal life cycle (a minimum of 15 individuals known or presumed to visit per year), but do not breed here.
Vagrant: Taxa that are found unexpectedly in New Zealand and whose presence in this region is naturally transitory, or migratory species with fewer than 15 individuals known or presumed to visit per year.
Coloniser: Taxa that otherwise trigger ‘Threatened’ categories because of small population size, but have arrived in New Zealand without direct or indirect help from humans and have been successfully reproducing in the wild since 1950.

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Revised (2007) structure of the New Zealand Threat Classification System. From Townsend et al. 2008.
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Revised (2007) structure of the New Zealand Threat Classification System. From Townsend et al. 2008.

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 18 Glossy Ibis, Wairau Lagoons :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-09-25T12:06:44+12:00 2018-09-25T12:06:44+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7936&p=37893#p37893
What is the difference between endemic and native?
In biology and ecology, endemic means exclusively native to the biota of a specific place. An indigenous species may occur in areas other than the one under consideration. The terms endemic and indigenous do not imply that an organism necessarily originated or evolved from where it is found.
Cheers, Grahame]]>

What is the difference between endemic and native?
In biology and ecology, endemic means exclusively native to the biota of a specific place. An indigenous species may occur in areas other than the one under consideration. The terms endemic and indigenous do not imply that an organism necessarily originated or evolved from where it is found.
Cheers, Grahame]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 18 Glossy Ibis, Wairau Lagoons :: Reply by Mtn Breeze]]> 2018-09-27T19:47:01+12:00 2018-09-27T19:47:01+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7936&p=37907#p37907
I spent a few hours down the end of Hardings Road over the last couple of days. Really good numbers of glossy Ibis around both on the island and on a couple of nearby shallow ponds.

I was interested to see in one of my images that one individual was flying with a 'droopy' leg. I'm picking this is the same bird as the very first one that showed up several years ago, which was always identifiable by that funny leg.

Matt.


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I spent a few hours down the end of Hardings Road over the last couple of days. Really good numbers of glossy Ibis around both on the island and on a couple of nearby shallow ponds.

I was interested to see in one of my images that one individual was flying with a 'droopy' leg. I'm picking this is the same bird as the very first one that showed up several years ago, which was always identifiable by that funny leg.

Matt.


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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 18 Glossy Ibis, Wairau Lagoons :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-09-27T21:55:09+12:00 2018-09-27T21:55:09+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7936&p=37908#p37908 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 18 Glossy Ibis, Wairau Lagoons :: Reply by Olwen]]> 2018-09-27T22:50:15+12:00 2018-09-27T22:50:15+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7936&p=37909#p37909 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 18 Glossy Ibis, Wairau Lagoons :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-09-28T21:02:38+12:00 2018-09-28T21:02:38+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7936&p=37918#p37918 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 18 Glossy Ibis, Wairau Lagoons :: Reply by boneywhitefoot]]> 2018-09-29T12:27:11+12:00 2018-09-29T12:27:11+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7936&p=37922#p37922 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: 18 Glossy Ibis, Wairau Lagoons :: Reply by Will Parsons]]> 2018-09-29T20:12:14+12:00 2018-09-29T20:12:14+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7936&p=37929#p37929 glossy dozen.JPG

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Big Sand Island :: Author phil hammond]]> 2018-09-29T12:00:28+12:00 2018-09-29T12:00:28+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7953&p=37921#p37921
Barwit-----3440
SIPO--------290
VOC--------18
R Knot------not counted---about 300-400
Turnstone--4
Whimbrel--1
Wrybill-----1
NZ Dott----15
M Lapwing-12
P Stilt------9
Kelp Gull---17
Black bill G-7
Caspian Tern-21
Little Tern--2

The Little Terns were moulting out of breeding plumage with black loral lines gone and receded crowns, but with more than 50% of their bills still showing some yellow

This is the first time I have been to Big Sand and not seen a single WF Tern ---obviously away breeding elsewhere. Also no Banded Dotts seen. and no birds at all in the sarcocornia across from the the causeway

Phil Hammond
Wrybill Birding Tours NZ
Great Birds, Real Birders]]>

Barwit-----3440
SIPO--------290
VOC--------18
R Knot------not counted---about 300-400
Turnstone--4
Whimbrel--1
Wrybill-----1
NZ Dott----15
M Lapwing-12
P Stilt------9
Kelp Gull---17
Black bill G-7
Caspian Tern-21
Little Tern--2

The Little Terns were moulting out of breeding plumage with black loral lines gone and receded crowns, but with more than 50% of their bills still showing some yellow

This is the first time I have been to Big Sand and not seen a single WF Tern ---obviously away breeding elsewhere. Also no Banded Dotts seen. and no birds at all in the sarcocornia across from the the causeway

Phil Hammond
Wrybill Birding Tours NZ
Great Birds, Real Birders]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Big Sand Island :: Reply by zarkov]]> 2018-09-29T16:45:04+12:00 2018-09-29T16:45:04+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7953&p=37927#p37927 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Big Sand Island :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-09-29T21:37:15+12:00 2018-09-29T21:37:15+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7953&p=37930#p37930 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Big Sand Island :: Reply by phil hammond]]> 2018-09-30T21:41:54+13:00 2018-09-30T21:41:54+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7953&p=37935#p37935
They were also not seen, at least not at the North end, at the OSNZ census 16/6/18. I have not checked the census data to see if they were picked up somewhere else.]]>

They were also not seen, at least not at the North end, at the OSNZ census 16/6/18. I have not checked the census data to see if they were picked up somewhere else.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Big Sand Island :: Reply by phil hammond]]> 2018-10-01T22:09:30+13:00 2018-10-01T22:09:30+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7953&p=37942#p37942
The reasoning being that the first arrivals of this species from the northern hemisphere [most of our Little Terns are northern hemisphere breeders] would not normally be here for another 3 weeks or so and more importantly when they do get here they have already lost all of the yellow on their bills ---you can see them getting some yellow on their bills before they leave in autumn but when they come back in spring the yellow has already gone

Will these be the only 2 Austral bred Little Terns in NZ this year ? ---happy to be corrected

One of them on Friday was a bit odd with what looked like a longer, finer bill than the other and may be a bird that has been followed by small Tern enthusiasts for 2 or 3 years, and one of them may have been the one we saw at distance up there during the OSNZ winter census]]>

The reasoning being that the first arrivals of this species from the northern hemisphere [most of our Little Terns are northern hemisphere breeders] would not normally be here for another 3 weeks or so and more importantly when they do get here they have already lost all of the yellow on their bills ---you can see them getting some yellow on their bills before they leave in autumn but when they come back in spring the yellow has already gone

Will these be the only 2 Austral bred Little Terns in NZ this year ? ---happy to be corrected

One of them on Friday was a bit odd with what looked like a longer, finer bill than the other and may be a bird that has been followed by small Tern enthusiasts for 2 or 3 years, and one of them may have been the one we saw at distance up there during the OSNZ winter census]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Kaka in Invercargill :: Author Phil Rhodes]]> 2018-10-02T12:43:04+13:00 2018-10-02T12:43:04+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7955&p=37947#p37947 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Otago Canyon Pelagic - Sept 29th. :: Author Steve Wood]]> 2018-10-02T20:14:23+13:00 2018-10-02T20:14:23+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7956&p=37950#p37950
After some what touch and go with the weather forecast we were finally granted a small window of opportunity on Sunday and were all treated to a great day out with some good birds - highlights being Broad billed Prion and non breeding [b]Antarctic Tern[/b] plus some good Cetaceans.
Good numbers of Albatross were present most of the day and increased in numbers as the weather picked up towards the end of the last chumming spot.
Salvin's Albatross - the most common, up to a dozen + at one stage and to a lesser extent were White capped Alberts. Juv of both were also present.
Southern Royals (7+) - were impressive as always, one exceptionally large individual.
Black browed type - at least 1 in the wake.
Northern Royal (1+) - soon after departing the headland.
Northern Giant Petrel (3+)
Cape Petrel (40+) ssp australe
Broad Billed Prion 1- fairly good but brief view.
Fairy Prion (-5)
Antarctic Tern - fairly brief view.
White fronts - (-5)
White Chinned Petrel- (-3)
Westland Petrel - (-5)
Sooty Shearwater.- (50+) steady stream of ones and twos heading south for most of the day.
Fluttering/Hutton's Shearwater- (5+) not seen well.
Spotted Shag
Otago Shag.
Red billed Gull.
Black Backed Gull.

Cetaceans

Hump backed Whale - One smallish individual seen close in shore amongst Dusky Dolphin's.

Shepard's Beaked Whale- (5+) - small group seen breaching at a distance and again seen for a short period on surface. A range in size noted.

Attachments


Hump backed Whale
DSC_6065 (2).jpg (163.71 KiB)
Hump backed Whale

Shepared's Beaked Whale
DSC_6184 (2).jpg (235.17 KiB)
Shepared's Beaked Whale

]]>

After some what touch and go with the weather forecast we were finally granted a small window of opportunity on Sunday and were all treated to a great day out with some good birds - highlights being Broad billed Prion and non breeding [b]Antarctic Tern[/b] plus some good Cetaceans.
Good numbers of Albatross were present most of the day and increased in numbers as the weather picked up towards the end of the last chumming spot.
Salvin's Albatross - the most common, up to a dozen + at one stage and to a lesser extent were White capped Alberts. Juv of both were also present.
Southern Royals (7+) - were impressive as always, one exceptionally large individual.
Black browed type - at least 1 in the wake.
Northern Royal (1+) - soon after departing the headland.
Northern Giant Petrel (3+)
Cape Petrel (40+) ssp australe
Broad Billed Prion 1- fairly good but brief view.
Fairy Prion (-5)
Antarctic Tern - fairly brief view.
White fronts - (-5)
White Chinned Petrel- (-3)
Westland Petrel - (-5)
Sooty Shearwater.- (50+) steady stream of ones and twos heading south for most of the day.
Fluttering/Hutton's Shearwater- (5+) not seen well.
Spotted Shag
Otago Shag.
Red billed Gull.
Black Backed Gull.

Cetaceans

Hump backed Whale - One smallish individual seen close in shore amongst Dusky Dolphin's.

Shepard's Beaked Whale- (5+) - small group seen breaching at a distance and again seen for a short period on surface. A range in size noted.

Attachments


Hump backed Whale
DSC_6065 (2).jpg (163.71 KiB)
Hump backed Whale

Shepared's Beaked Whale
DSC_6184 (2).jpg (235.17 KiB)
Shepared's Beaked Whale

]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Pelagic - Otago Canyon Sat- Sept 29th. :: Reply by Steve Wood]]> 2018-10-02T20:49:42+13:00 2018-10-02T20:49:42+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7956&p=37951#p37951

Attachments


Antarctic Tern
DSC_6084 (2).jpg (84.64 KiB)
Antarctic Tern

Broad billed Prion
DSC_6110 (3).jpg (160.22 KiB)
Broad billed Prion

]]>

Attachments


Antarctic Tern
DSC_6084 (2).jpg (84.64 KiB)
Antarctic Tern

Broad billed Prion
DSC_6110 (3).jpg (160.22 KiB)
Broad billed Prion

]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Otago Canyon Pelagic - Sept 29th. :: Reply by Davidthomas]]> 2018-10-02T21:32:31+13:00 2018-10-02T21:32:31+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7956&p=37953#p37953 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Otago Canyon Pelagic - Sept 29th. :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-10-03T10:14:59+13:00 2018-10-03T10:14:59+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7956&p=37954#p37954 Thanks
Tim

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Thanks
Tim

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IMG_4264.jpg (148.35 KiB)



IMG_4257.jpg (187.18 KiB)


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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Cirl Bunting in Halswell Quarry :: Author Jan]]> 2018-10-05T13:41:33+13:00 2018-10-05T13:41:33+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7960&p=37967#p37967 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Unusual bird - Vanellus Coronatus? :: Author Nizzy]]> 2018-10-05T09:59:47+13:00 2018-10-05T09:59:47+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7958&p=37964#p37964 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Unusual bird - Vanellus Coronatus? :: Reply by les]]> 2018-10-05T15:22:57+13:00 2018-10-05T15:22:57+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7958&p=37968#p37968 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Unusual bird - Vanellus Coronatus? :: Reply by Liam Ballard]]> 2018-10-06T12:49:10+13:00 2018-10-06T12:49:10+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7958&p=37972#p37972 ]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Glossy Ibis on Stewart Island :: Reply by Dean Hashmi]]> 2018-10-02T11:11:34+13:00 2018-10-02T11:11:34+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6892&p=37944#p37944 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Glossy Ibis on Stewart Island :: Reply by Phil Rhodes]]> 2018-10-06T13:40:33+13:00 2018-10-06T13:40:33+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6892&p=37976#p37976 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Brown teal joined domestic ducks in Thames. :: Author Clinton9]]> 2018-10-06T23:54:44+13:00 2018-10-06T23:54:44+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7964&p=37983#p37983
Have a look at photos of Brown teal, and male hybrid Mallard X Grey duck, with girlfriend...domestic Mallard duck, and two hybrid Mallard X Muscovy ducks., and domestic ducks.

20181006_143237.jpg


20181006_143237.jpg


20181006_143237.jpg


20181006_143237.jpg

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20181006_143227.jpg (492.98 KiB)


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Have a look at photos of Brown teal, and male hybrid Mallard X Grey duck, with girlfriend...domestic Mallard duck, and two hybrid Mallard X Muscovy ducks., and domestic ducks.

20181006_143237.jpg


20181006_143237.jpg


20181006_143237.jpg


20181006_143237.jpg

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20181006_143237.jpg (329.23 KiB)



20181006_143231.jpg (500.14 KiB)



20181006_143227.jpg (492.98 KiB)


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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Pomarine Skua, Island Bay :: Author Michael Szabo]]> 2018-10-07T11:34:13+13:00 2018-10-07T11:34:13+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7965&p=37986#p37986 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: New Zealand dotterel on the Whanganui Estuary :: Author Paul Gibson]]> 2018-10-08T09:30:05+13:00 2018-10-08T09:30:05+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7967&p=37996#p37996 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Blackbird on birdball and SWPlover nesting in Chch centra plus Bellbirds looking like nestingl :: Author Jan]]> 2018-09-25T16:51:43+12:00 2018-09-25T16:51:43+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7947&p=37894#p37894 He has been eyeing it up for weeks and perching close by, but now he's nailed it. His mate has a 4-egg nest that was buffeted around last night in the gale, but seems to be intact.

I've never heard of Blackbirds doing this before but please tell me if I'm wrong. We get sparrows and greenfinch regularly on it, and chaffinches that flap wildly but never perch. Mostly it's for Silvereyes.

There's a nest with 3 eggs at 237 Cambridge Tce next to the site of the Pyne Gould Guinness building that collapsed in 2012.
It's on the Otakaro Orchard land that is being developed as a community garden and food forest. Unfortunately there was a gathering at the site on Sunday where folk could pick up seed packets to get veg. germinating before returning the seedlings for planting and the birds may have been off the nest for maybe 2 hours. I guess it's a case of one good thing trumping another and SWPlover are on the pest list?]]>
He has been eyeing it up for weeks and perching close by, but now he's nailed it. His mate has a 4-egg nest that was buffeted around last night in the gale, but seems to be intact.

I've never heard of Blackbirds doing this before but please tell me if I'm wrong. We get sparrows and greenfinch regularly on it, and chaffinches that flap wildly but never perch. Mostly it's for Silvereyes.

There's a nest with 3 eggs at 237 Cambridge Tce next to the site of the Pyne Gould Guinness building that collapsed in 2012.
It's on the Otakaro Orchard land that is being developed as a community garden and food forest. Unfortunately there was a gathering at the site on Sunday where folk could pick up seed packets to get veg. germinating before returning the seedlings for planting and the birds may have been off the nest for maybe 2 hours. I guess it's a case of one good thing trumping another and SWPlover are on the pest list?]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Blackbird on birdball and SWPlover nesting in Chch centra plus Bellbirds looking like nestingl :: Reply by Jan]]> 2018-10-05T13:34:22+13:00 2018-10-05T13:34:22+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7947&p=37966#p37966 A pair? of Bellbird come around and quietly feed on the ground, not sure what on, they don't come together. They must have a nest nearby but it could be in the property opposite across the rd.]]> A pair? of Bellbird come around and quietly feed on the ground, not sure what on, they don't come together. They must have a nest nearby but it could be in the property opposite across the rd.]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Blackbird on birdball and SWPlover nesting in Chch centra plus Bellbirds looking like nestingl :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-10-08T12:22:54+13:00 2018-10-08T12:22:54+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7947&p=37998#p37998 Meant to say I always enjoy your posts - always interesting observations
Make a nice change from the speed birding 40 birds in 40 minutes (although they are interestimg too!)

cheers
jim]]>
Meant to say I always enjoy your posts - always interesting observations
Make a nice change from the speed birding 40 birds in 40 minutes (although they are interestimg too!)

cheers
jim]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Waikato Kaka :: Reply by David Riddell]]> 2018-09-28T18:15:20+12:00 2018-09-28T18:15:20+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6849&p=37915#p37915 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Waikato Kaka :: Reply by David Riddell]]> 2018-10-09T08:20:17+13:00 2018-10-09T08:20:17+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6849&p=38004#p38004 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Lots of Grey Petrels - Chatham :: Author sav]]> 2018-10-10T14:40:32+13:00 2018-10-10T14:40:32+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7970&p=38027#p38027
I just got a note from Hadoram Shirahai, who is currently in the Chathams. He had over 20 Grey Petrels attracted by chum off the SW corner of Main Chatham on Sunday. Big number of a scarce bird eh?

cheers]]>

I just got a note from Hadoram Shirahai, who is currently in the Chathams. He had over 20 Grey Petrels attracted by chum off the SW corner of Main Chatham on Sunday. Big number of a scarce bird eh?

cheers]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Putative chestnut teal and three chestnut-breasted shelduck, Tip Lagoon Invercargill :: Author sjacques]]> 2018-10-08T20:56:53+13:00 2018-10-08T20:56:53+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7968&p=37999#p37999

Scanning through the large flock of shoveler and grey teal, a strikingly dark teal stood out. Overall plumage tone was dark chocolate brown, slightly warmer on the chest. Head was dark, looking 'hooded' rather than the 'capped' look of grey teal. Palest part of the bird was a small patch on the lower neck sides and throat. Eye was red. My brother Paul joined me and had good views of the bird; he saw the wing pattern as it flapped and noted a green speculum and white bar, similar pattern to grey teal. Looking at images on the net we feel the bird is a strong candidate for female chestnut teal - any views welcome!

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IMG_7530.JPG (203.64 KiB)



IMG_7509.JPG (184.97 KiB)



IMG_7453.JPG (85.7 KiB)


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Scanning through the large flock of shoveler and grey teal, a strikingly dark teal stood out. Overall plumage tone was dark chocolate brown, slightly warmer on the chest. Head was dark, looking 'hooded' rather than the 'capped' look of grey teal. Palest part of the bird was a small patch on the lower neck sides and throat. Eye was red. My brother Paul joined me and had good views of the bird; he saw the wing pattern as it flapped and noted a green speculum and white bar, similar pattern to grey teal. Looking at images on the net we feel the bird is a strong candidate for female chestnut teal - any views welcome!

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IMG_7530.JPG (203.64 KiB)



IMG_7509.JPG (184.97 KiB)



IMG_7453.JPG (85.7 KiB)


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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Putative chestnut teal, Tip Lagoon Invercargill :: Reply by sjacques]]> 2018-10-09T22:20:55+13:00 2018-10-09T22:20:55+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7968&p=38012#p38012
Size; slightly larger than nearby grey teal.
Irridescence; in strong light the chest and breast sides shone bronzy, the long folded tertials and top of the tail shone dark green.
Head shape; different to grey teal, appearing more angular and less rounded, peak of head in front of eye rather than behind eye as grey teal.

Other features noted as yesterday; overall strikingly dark compared to surrounding grey teal, dark cap and rear of head, grading through dusky face down to small pale area on neck.

Having looked through images from Australia, I strongly believe this is a chestnut teal, any comments welcome.

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Chestnut vs Grey.JPG (247.78 KiB)


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Size; slightly larger than nearby grey teal.
Irridescence; in strong light the chest and breast sides shone bronzy, the long folded tertials and top of the tail shone dark green.
Head shape; different to grey teal, appearing more angular and less rounded, peak of head in front of eye rather than behind eye as grey teal.

Other features noted as yesterday; overall strikingly dark compared to surrounding grey teal, dark cap and rear of head, grading through dusky face down to small pale area on neck.

Having looked through images from Australia, I strongly believe this is a chestnut teal, any comments welcome.

Attachments



Chestnut vs Grey.JPG (247.78 KiB)


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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Putative chestnut teal and three chestnut-breasted shelduck, Tip Lagoon Invercargill :: Reply by sjacques]]> 2018-10-10T07:58:15+13:00 2018-10-10T07:58:15+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7968&p=38015#p38015
As you can see all plumage and structural features correspond to the tip lagoon bird.

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female chestnut teal aussie.jpg (107.27 KiB)


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As you can see all plumage and structural features correspond to the tip lagoon bird.

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female chestnut teal aussie.jpg (107.27 KiB)


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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Putative chestnut teal and three chestnut-breasted shelduck, Tip Lagoon Invercargill :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-10-10T08:21:31+13:00 2018-10-10T08:21:31+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7968&p=38016#p38016
Looks like you're onto a winner! Well sleuthed. I doubt there would be many single female records of Chestnut Teal that are as well documented as this bird.

Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>

Looks like you're onto a winner! Well sleuthed. I doubt there would be many single female records of Chestnut Teal that are as well documented as this bird.

Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Putative chestnut teal and three chestnut-breasted shelduck, Tip Lagoon Invercargill :: Reply by Colin Miskelly]]> 2018-10-10T08:47:56+13:00 2018-10-10T08:47:56+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7968&p=38017#p38017
Great images and research here. The sighting is certainly worthy of submitting to the Records Appraisal Committee as an Unusual Bird Report. If you are new to the New Zealand birding scene, these processes may also be new to you. You can find more information (including the online submission form) here:

https://www.osnz.org.nz/rarebirds.htm

Cheers
Colin]]>

Great images and research here. The sighting is certainly worthy of submitting to the Records Appraisal Committee as an Unusual Bird Report. If you are new to the New Zealand birding scene, these processes may also be new to you. You can find more information (including the online submission form) here:

https://www.osnz.org.nz/rarebirds.htm

Cheers
Colin]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Putative chestnut teal and three chestnut-breasted shelduck, Tip Lagoon Invercargill :: Reply by Phil Rhodes]]> 2018-10-10T12:31:11+13:00 2018-10-10T12:31:11+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7968&p=38020#p38020 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Putative chestnut teal and three chestnut-breasted shelduck, Tip Lagoon Invercargill :: Reply by sav]]> 2018-10-10T13:10:57+13:00 2018-10-10T13:10:57+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7968&p=38022#p38022
Just a word of caution. This would be as difficult as id problems get in NZ. Grey Teal are notoriously variable in plumage and structure.

I agree that this bird looks different to the norm, but it still has a very pale chin. The photo from Tassie looks exactly like a Grey Teal to me........

When you find the stunning drake Chestnut Teal swimming next to it things will get easier!

cheers]]>

Just a word of caution. This would be as difficult as id problems get in NZ. Grey Teal are notoriously variable in plumage and structure.

I agree that this bird looks different to the norm, but it still has a very pale chin. The photo from Tassie looks exactly like a Grey Teal to me........

When you find the stunning drake Chestnut Teal swimming next to it things will get easier!

cheers]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Putative chestnut teal and three chestnut-breasted shelduck, Tip Lagoon Invercargill :: Reply by Steve Wood]]> 2018-10-10T19:56:18+13:00 2018-10-10T19:56:18+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7968&p=38033#p38033 Attached an image of a Grey Teal taken recently for comparison in Nelson.
clearly a much paler bird than Sean 's. and also size wise, Sean's duck looks heavier which would fit for Chestnut. Teal 505-800g & Grey Teal 350-670g.

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Grey Teal female - nelson poo ponds Sept 2018.jpg (210.33 KiB)


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Attached an image of a Grey Teal taken recently for comparison in Nelson.
clearly a much paler bird than Sean 's. and also size wise, Sean's duck looks heavier which would fit for Chestnut. Teal 505-800g & Grey Teal 350-670g.

Attachments



Grey Teal female - nelson poo ponds Sept 2018.jpg (210.33 KiB)


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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Putative chestnut teal and three chestnut-breasted shelduck, Tip Lagoon Invercargill :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-10-11T19:47:43+13:00 2018-10-11T19:47:43+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7968&p=38038#p38038
While it does have a pale throat it's the extent of dense dark markings in the cheek and dark chest (little contrast with the flanks) that does it for me and the chunkier size and slightly different head structure strengthens in the case. A feature that I haven't come across in field guides but sometimes stands out to me are the pale fringes to the fromt flanks/scap feathers---Wider and paler in Grey Teal; thinner and a bit more rufous-tinged in Chestnut (compare the photos above which I think helps make a case for the Taz bird as well).

Finally the centers to the flank feathers appear to be darker brown on average in Chestnut to me whereas Grey seems more pale brown-grey (warmer).

Hopefully it sticks around for further scrutiny.

Russ C
Morrinsville]]>

While it does have a pale throat it's the extent of dense dark markings in the cheek and dark chest (little contrast with the flanks) that does it for me and the chunkier size and slightly different head structure strengthens in the case. A feature that I haven't come across in field guides but sometimes stands out to me are the pale fringes to the fromt flanks/scap feathers---Wider and paler in Grey Teal; thinner and a bit more rufous-tinged in Chestnut (compare the photos above which I think helps make a case for the Taz bird as well).

Finally the centers to the flank feathers appear to be darker brown on average in Chestnut to me whereas Grey seems more pale brown-grey (warmer).

Hopefully it sticks around for further scrutiny.

Russ C
Morrinsville]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Putative chestnut teal and three chestnut-breasted shelduck, Tip Lagoon Invercargill :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-10-11T20:06:13+13:00 2018-10-11T20:06:13+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7968&p=38039#p38039 Cheers
Tim]]>
Cheers
Tim]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Putative chestnut teal and three chestnut-breasted shelduck, Tip Lagoon Invercargill :: Reply by sjacques]]> 2018-10-11T21:24:33+13:00 2018-10-11T21:24:33+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7968&p=38042#p38042
I am cautiously confident that this is a female chestnut teal (also the Tasmanian bird pictured in the post above), and have so far found the identification process very educational. In addition to my previous comments and those of others I would add;

Upperparts; Solid dark chocolate tone showing green iridescence in strong light. Very limited pale fringing to scapulars and tertials. Relative lack of contrast between the speculum and the tertials in the folded wing. These features seem to be shared in both sexes of chestnut teal, and is a key difference with grey teal, where the scapulars and tertials have prominent pale fringes and the dark speculum stands out in obvious contrast to the pale ground of the upperparts.

Head and neck; I have looked through many images of both species, and this is also a key feature. The tip lagoon bird shows a solid dark cap extending from the nape of the neck forward to reach the bill and down to the bottom the eye. This grades down through the dusky face to a small pale area on the front of the neck. There is no strong contrast between the cap and face, unlike grey teal in which the cap contrasts strongly with the pale face, which is con-colourant with the neck. In this respect, there is a three part pattern in chestnut; cap, face and neck, and a two part pattern in grey; cap and face/neck. A restricted pale area on the front of the neck appears to be a fairly consistent feature in female chestnut teal from the images I have seen.

Attached is a heavy crop of the tip lagoon bird showing a small area of chestnut coloured feathering on the hind flank - note this is also present on the Tasmanian bird.

Cheers,
Sean.

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chestnutty.jpg (46.9 KiB)


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I am cautiously confident that this is a female chestnut teal (also the Tasmanian bird pictured in the post above), and have so far found the identification process very educational. In addition to my previous comments and those of others I would add;

Upperparts; Solid dark chocolate tone showing green iridescence in strong light. Very limited pale fringing to scapulars and tertials. Relative lack of contrast between the speculum and the tertials in the folded wing. These features seem to be shared in both sexes of chestnut teal, and is a key difference with grey teal, where the scapulars and tertials have prominent pale fringes and the dark speculum stands out in obvious contrast to the pale ground of the upperparts.

Head and neck; I have looked through many images of both species, and this is also a key feature. The tip lagoon bird shows a solid dark cap extending from the nape of the neck forward to reach the bill and down to the bottom the eye. This grades down through the dusky face to a small pale area on the front of the neck. There is no strong contrast between the cap and face, unlike grey teal in which the cap contrasts strongly with the pale face, which is con-colourant with the neck. In this respect, there is a three part pattern in chestnut; cap, face and neck, and a two part pattern in grey; cap and face/neck. A restricted pale area on the front of the neck appears to be a fairly consistent feature in female chestnut teal from the images I have seen.

Attached is a heavy crop of the tip lagoon bird showing a small area of chestnut coloured feathering on the hind flank - note this is also present on the Tasmanian bird.

Cheers,
Sean.

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chestnutty.jpg (46.9 KiB)


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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Putative chestnut teal and three chestnut-breasted shelduck, Tip Lagoon Invercargill :: Reply by Steve Wood]]> 2018-10-12T09:59:33+13:00 2018-10-12T09:59:33+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7968&p=38043#p38043 I think they also resemble Sean's duck but the head shape is different again, these birds having a much more uniformly rounded head if that carry's any weight? Sean's bird is some what angular and not smoothly round and I cant find anything that says the head shape should be different from Grey Teal.
This might be a weak point.

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I think they also resemble Sean's duck but the head shape is different again, these birds having a much more uniformly rounded head if that carry's any weight? Sean's bird is some what angular and not smoothly round and I cant find anything that says the head shape should be different from Grey Teal.
This might be a weak point.

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Eastern Curlew Golden Bay :: Reply by kengeorge]]> 2018-10-14T15:56:31+13:00 2018-10-14T15:56:31+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7862&p=38050#p38050

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Eastern Curlew Golden Bay :: Reply by kengeorge]]> 2018-10-15T12:14:46+13:00 2018-10-15T12:14:46+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7862&p=38054#p38054 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by pfe92nz]]> 2018-10-02T17:31:31+13:00 2018-10-02T17:31:31+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=37949#p37949 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Myna in New Brighton, Christchurch :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-10-16T11:50:44+13:00 2018-10-16T11:50:44+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7691&p=38060#p38060 Cheers, Grahame]]> Cheers, Grahame]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Wrybill Petone beach :: Author ledzep]]> 2018-10-16T15:39:59+13:00 2018-10-16T15:39:59+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7975&p=38062#p38062

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Hudsonian godwit? :: Author CMKMStephens]]> 2018-10-14T00:19:58+13:00 2018-10-14T00:19:58+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7971&p=38045#p38045
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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Hudsonian godwit? :: Reply by Ian Southey]]> 2018-10-14T06:54:30+13:00 2018-10-14T06:54:30+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7971&p=38047#p38047
Ian]]>

Ian]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Hudsonian godwit? :: Reply by phil hammond]]> 2018-10-16T13:49:32+13:00 2018-10-16T13:49:32+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7971&p=38061#p38061 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Hudsonian godwit? :: Reply by CMKMStephens]]> 2018-10-16T18:28:06+13:00 2018-10-16T18:28:06+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7971&p=38064#p38064
If it was roosting on the sand spit, 100% of the spit is currently on the south side of the estuary, so you'd need to probably take a vehicle around and down to South Spit road (there's no aerial or satellite that's up to date - Google maps particularly out of date). the spit I believe is connected to the land on the south side at the moment (there were whitebaiters with their 4x4's on the south side)

Something like this:

hud.png

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If it was roosting on the sand spit, 100% of the spit is currently on the south side of the estuary, so you'd need to probably take a vehicle around and down to South Spit road (there's no aerial or satellite that's up to date - Google maps particularly out of date). the spit I believe is connected to the land on the south side at the moment (there were whitebaiters with their 4x4's on the south side)

Something like this:

hud.png

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: possible Intermediate egret - Papakura :: Author BombayDave]]> 2018-10-14T22:46:23+13:00 2018-10-14T22:46:23+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7973&p=38052#p38052
Seen on 2 occasions in last 3 days feeding on exposed mudflats at low tide. Only had a fleeting view from SH1 but bird was feeding alongside WF herons and seemed to be the same size.]]>

Seen on 2 occasions in last 3 days feeding on exposed mudflats at low tide. Only had a fleeting view from SH1 but bird was feeding alongside WF herons and seemed to be the same size.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: possible Intermediate egret - Papakura :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-10-15T11:43:20+13:00 2018-10-15T11:43:20+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7973&p=38053#p38053
Any reason why this couldn't be the Little Egret that was present at that location during the winter? Intermediates tend to be more closely associated with freshwater environments.

Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>

Any reason why this couldn't be the Little Egret that was present at that location during the winter? Intermediates tend to be more closely associated with freshwater environments.

Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: possible Intermediate egret - Papakura :: Reply by BombayDave]]> 2018-10-15T17:55:51+13:00 2018-10-15T17:55:51+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7973&p=38055#p38055 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: possible Intermediate egret - Papakura :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-10-15T19:43:15+13:00 2018-10-15T19:43:15+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7973&p=38056#p38056
Russ]]>

Russ]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: possible Intermediate egret - Papakura :: Reply by sav]]> 2018-10-16T17:40:05+13:00 2018-10-16T17:40:05+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7973&p=38063#p38063 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: possible Intermediate egret - Papakura :: Reply by George Hobson]]> 2018-10-17T10:55:12+13:00 2018-10-17T10:55:12+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7973&p=38067#p38067
sav wrote:If it was the same size as a WFHeron, isn't it more likely to be a Spoonbill?

I was surprised at the size of the Little Egret at Foxton, it was very similar to the nearby WFH. I was anticipating it to more.... Little ;)]]>
sav wrote:If it was the same size as a WFHeron, isn't it more likely to be a Spoonbill?

I was surprised at the size of the Little Egret at Foxton, it was very similar to the nearby WFH. I was anticipating it to more.... Little ;)]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Oriental Cuckoo, Wairarapa :: Author Liam Ballard]]> 2018-10-17T08:22:28+13:00 2018-10-17T08:22:28+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7976&p=38066#p38066 ! This just came across my inbox from the ebird alerts. Does anyone have any more information?

https://ebird.org/newzealand/view/checklist/S49234447]]>
! This just came across my inbox from the ebird alerts. Does anyone have any more information?

https://ebird.org/newzealand/view/checklist/S49234447]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Oriental Cuckoo, Wairarapa :: Reply by sav]]> 2018-10-17T13:25:48+13:00 2018-10-17T13:25:48+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7976&p=38068#p38068
cheers]]>

cheers]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Oriental Cuckoo, Wairarapa :: Reply by simon.fordham]]> 2018-10-17T13:29:25+13:00 2018-10-17T13:29:25+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7976&p=38069#p38069 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Oriental Cuckoo, Wairarapa :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-10-17T14:02:32+13:00 2018-10-17T14:02:32+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7976&p=38070#p38070
The oriental cuckoo is a slender, medium-large cuckoo, about the size of a blackbird. Its proportions and shape are reminiscent of a small falcon. The plumage is variable, either dark grey, or rufous with heavy barring on the back, but all forms have white underparts that are heavily barred with black. All records have been between October and April, which is when oriental cuckoos migrate to Australia between breeding seasons.


Less likely to be a Shining cuckoo if it was near-blackbird size, grey on top, and perched on a fence. Oriental cuckoos are at least twice the size of a Shining and they saw it from 10m away. The call is pretty distinct too but their description does not narrow it down.]]>

The oriental cuckoo is a slender, medium-large cuckoo, about the size of a blackbird. Its proportions and shape are reminiscent of a small falcon. The plumage is variable, either dark grey, or rufous with heavy barring on the back, but all forms have white underparts that are heavily barred with black. All records have been between October and April, which is when oriental cuckoos migrate to Australia between breeding seasons.


Less likely to be a Shining cuckoo if it was near-blackbird size, grey on top, and perched on a fence. Oriental cuckoos are at least twice the size of a Shining and they saw it from 10m away. The call is pretty distinct too but their description does not narrow it down.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: miranda today :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-09-23T19:21:27+12:00 2018-09-23T19:21:27+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4177&p=37871#p37871 Cheers, Grahame]]> Cheers, Grahame]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: miranda today :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-10-07T13:21:47+13:00 2018-10-07T13:21:47+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4177&p=37989#p37989 Grahame]]> Grahame]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: miranda today :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-10-09T09:10:03+13:00 2018-10-09T09:10:03+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4177&p=38005#p38005 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: miranda today :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-10-09T12:11:19+13:00 2018-10-09T12:11:19+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4177&p=38007#p38007 Grahame]]> Grahame]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: miranda today :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-10-17T16:15:21+13:00 2018-10-17T16:15:21+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4177&p=38073#p38073 Grahame]]> Grahame]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington City biodiversity :: Reply by ledzep]]> 2018-10-17T16:50:23+13:00 2018-10-17T16:50:23+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=694&p=38074#p38074

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Tutukaka Pelagic October 7. :: Author Les Feasey]]> 2018-10-09T09:29:04+13:00 2018-10-09T09:29:04+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7969&p=38006#p38006
Highlights were:
Wilson's Storm Petrel that stayed around with the NZ Storm Petrel and White-faced Storm Petrel;
White-chinned Petrel (We don’t see them that often this far north):
A complete list of birds seen at the chum spot:

1 Buller's Mollymawk
1 Northern Royal Albatross
6 Wandering Albatross
1 Wilson's Storm-Petrel
7 White-faced Storm-Petrel
4 New Zealand Storm-Petrel
1 Northern Giant Petrel
8 Grey-faced Petrel
30 Cook's Petrel
40 Fairy Prion
1 White-chinned Petrel
6 Parkinson's Petrel (Black Petrel)
1 Flesh-footed Shearwater
3 Buller's Shearwater
10 Sooty Shearwater
12 Little Shearwater
7 Australasian Gannet

On the way out to Poor Knights:
450 Common Diving Petrel were directly observed, but we guessed there were over 1000;
100's of Buller's Shearwater;
100’s Fairy Prion were also passed before we reached Poor Knights;
120 Little Shearwater;
3 Little Blue Penguin;
1 Black-browed Molly;
43 Pied shag roosting on trees in the harbour;
135 Red-billed gull roosting on the rocks in the harbour

A Blue shark was very interested in the berley bag. It stayed around for over an hour, and when it wasn’t pestering the berley bag had an ongoing discussion with a young Wandering Albatross.

The return trip inside the Poor Knights started out with passing Buller’s Shearwater and Fairy Prion in a steady stream, then suddenly, it was all excitement. A boil-up of Mackerel pushing Krill to the surface brought around Buller’s Shearwater, Fairy Prion and a few Fluttering Shearwater.

A great end to another great Tutukaka Pelagic day. Thanks Scotty.

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Boil-up with Buller's
3 Boilup.jpg (519.34 KiB)
Boil-up with Buller's

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Highlights were:
Wilson's Storm Petrel that stayed around with the NZ Storm Petrel and White-faced Storm Petrel;
White-chinned Petrel (We don’t see them that often this far north):
A complete list of birds seen at the chum spot:

1 Buller's Mollymawk
1 Northern Royal Albatross
6 Wandering Albatross
1 Wilson's Storm-Petrel
7 White-faced Storm-Petrel
4 New Zealand Storm-Petrel
1 Northern Giant Petrel
8 Grey-faced Petrel
30 Cook's Petrel
40 Fairy Prion
1 White-chinned Petrel
6 Parkinson's Petrel (Black Petrel)
1 Flesh-footed Shearwater
3 Buller's Shearwater
10 Sooty Shearwater
12 Little Shearwater
7 Australasian Gannet

On the way out to Poor Knights:
450 Common Diving Petrel were directly observed, but we guessed there were over 1000;
100's of Buller's Shearwater;
100’s Fairy Prion were also passed before we reached Poor Knights;
120 Little Shearwater;
3 Little Blue Penguin;
1 Black-browed Molly;
43 Pied shag roosting on trees in the harbour;
135 Red-billed gull roosting on the rocks in the harbour

A Blue shark was very interested in the berley bag. It stayed around for over an hour, and when it wasn’t pestering the berley bag had an ongoing discussion with a young Wandering Albatross.

The return trip inside the Poor Knights started out with passing Buller’s Shearwater and Fairy Prion in a steady stream, then suddenly, it was all excitement. A boil-up of Mackerel pushing Krill to the surface brought around Buller’s Shearwater, Fairy Prion and a few Fluttering Shearwater.

A great end to another great Tutukaka Pelagic day. Thanks Scotty.

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Boil-up with Buller's
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Boil-up with Buller's

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic October 7. :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-10-09T21:35:53+13:00 2018-10-09T21:35:53+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7969&p=38011#p38011 Cheers
Tim]]>
Cheers
Tim]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic October 7. :: Reply by Davidthomas]]> 2018-10-10T06:46:25+13:00 2018-10-10T06:46:25+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7969&p=38013#p38013
After this trip the Wilsons Storm Petrel takes Tutukaka to 33 species of Tubenose which considering its only been occurring for about a year is absolutely remarkable. I reckon it puts it in the top 5 locations in the world for tubenose species observed on single day pelagics! Crazy. Kaikoura in all its years of running only has 41?]]>

After this trip the Wilsons Storm Petrel takes Tutukaka to 33 species of Tubenose which considering its only been occurring for about a year is absolutely remarkable. I reckon it puts it in the top 5 locations in the world for tubenose species observed on single day pelagics! Crazy. Kaikoura in all its years of running only has 41?]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic October 7. :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-10-10T07:30:09+13:00 2018-10-10T07:30:09+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7969&p=38014#p38014 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic October 7. :: Reply by sav]]> 2018-10-10T13:27:49+13:00 2018-10-10T13:27:49+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7969&p=38024#p38024
I'm absolutely intrigued by David's post.

Where the Little Shears in flocks? or were there just loads of small groups/pairs?
Where were all the Flutterers?
I never ever thought I would read the statement "probably more common than any other shearwater" with regards to Little Shearwater.

Has anyone else ever seen such numbers of Little Shearwater? - anywhere?

cheers,]]>

I'm absolutely intrigued by David's post.

Where the Little Shears in flocks? or were there just loads of small groups/pairs?
Where were all the Flutterers?
I never ever thought I would read the statement "probably more common than any other shearwater" with regards to Little Shearwater.

Has anyone else ever seen such numbers of Little Shearwater? - anywhere?

cheers,]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic October 7. :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-10-10T15:29:53+13:00 2018-10-10T15:29:53+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7969&p=38030#p38030 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic October 7. :: Reply by Davidthomas]]> 2018-10-10T16:08:57+13:00 2018-10-10T16:08:57+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7969&p=38031#p38031
Sorry for the confusion guys!]]>

Sorry for the confusion guys!]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic October 7. :: Reply by sav]]> 2018-10-10T16:27:21+13:00 2018-10-10T16:27:21+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7969&p=38032#p38032
So, back to Tims original question - were there really 120 Little Shears on October 7?

cheers]]>

So, back to Tims original question - were there really 120 Little Shears on October 7?

cheers]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic October 7. :: Reply by igor]]> 2018-10-10T21:53:50+13:00 2018-10-10T21:53:50+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7969&p=38034#p38034 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic October 7. :: Reply by sav]]> 2018-10-11T15:24:04+13:00 2018-10-11T15:24:04+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7969&p=38035#p38035 That's really good. My feeling was that we were seeing fewer Littles in recent years in the Hauraki Gulf, so it is heartening to know that they are still out there!
cheers]]>
That's really good. My feeling was that we were seeing fewer Littles in recent years in the Hauraki Gulf, so it is heartening to know that they are still out there!
cheers]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic October 7. :: Reply by Les Feasey]]> 2018-10-11T21:21:32+13:00 2018-10-11T21:21:32+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7969&p=38041#p38041 I was up at Parengarenga trying to find a godwit and missed the fun (and the godwit). Thanks for kicking in Igor and yes, I agree, there were loads of Little Shears, mostly in ones and twos or small groups but really constant from the Harbour to the Poor Knights. We were moving at pace in rough choppy seas so I couldn't stand, just hanging on, so missed out on photos.
In answer to your query, Sav, about other sites where there are lots of Little shears, I pretty sure I saw that once out of Whangaroa. They nest on Stephenson's islands and at certain times of year there are quite big numbers up there. They don't come near the boat so getting a photo is a trick. I see that Oscar did it, though.
Cheers,]]>
I was up at Parengarenga trying to find a godwit and missed the fun (and the godwit). Thanks for kicking in Igor and yes, I agree, there were loads of Little Shears, mostly in ones and twos or small groups but really constant from the Harbour to the Poor Knights. We were moving at pace in rough choppy seas so I couldn't stand, just hanging on, so missed out on photos.
In answer to your query, Sav, about other sites where there are lots of Little shears, I pretty sure I saw that once out of Whangaroa. They nest on Stephenson's islands and at certain times of year there are quite big numbers up there. They don't come near the boat so getting a photo is a trick. I see that Oscar did it, though.
Cheers,]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic October 7. :: Reply by ourspot]]> 2018-10-17T16:01:27+13:00 2018-10-17T16:01:27+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7969&p=38072#p38072
One great highlight of the recent pelagic trip was the interaction between a Wandering Albatross that sat off the back of the boat and a Blue Shark (which was approx 2.5 to 3 metres long). The albatross was not bothered by the shark, but always knew where it was. When the shark got close the albatross would just brush it away with it's foot. This went on for about an hour or so. At one stage the shark and the albatross were having a little tug of war over a piece of squid – don't know if anyone managed a shot of this (I didn't) but it was an amazing sight.

Cheers Scott

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Wandering Albatross & Blue Shark_Tutukaka Pelagic_Oct18_FB_IMG_2441.jpg (491.52 KiB)


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One great highlight of the recent pelagic trip was the interaction between a Wandering Albatross that sat off the back of the boat and a Blue Shark (which was approx 2.5 to 3 metres long). The albatross was not bothered by the shark, but always knew where it was. When the shark got close the albatross would just brush it away with it's foot. This went on for about an hour or so. At one stage the shark and the albatross were having a little tug of war over a piece of squid – don't know if anyone managed a shot of this (I didn't) but it was an amazing sight.

Cheers Scott

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Wandering Albatross & Blue Shark_Tutukaka Pelagic_Oct18_FB_IMG_2441.jpg (491.52 KiB)


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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Tutukaka Pelagic October 7. :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-10-17T18:11:53+13:00 2018-10-17T18:11:53+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7969&p=38075#p38075 I can remember a very similar encounter off Tologa Bay back in the day. It was quite tense for a time - we weren't too sure how it was going to play out. The Alby even delivered a peck to the nose before eventually getting tired of the attention and flying off ...
No doubt a stand off that has played out for a very long time ...
Cheers
Tim]]>
I can remember a very similar encounter off Tologa Bay back in the day. It was quite tense for a time - we weren't too sure how it was going to play out. The Alby even delivered a peck to the nose before eventually getting tired of the attention and flying off ...
No doubt a stand off that has played out for a very long time ...
Cheers
Tim]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by Nikki McArthur]]> 2018-10-10T11:36:39+13:00 2018-10-10T11:36:39+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=38018#p38018 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by sav]]> 2018-10-10T12:13:43+13:00 2018-10-10T12:13:43+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=38019#p38019
Can you ask her what plumage it has now? I'm trying to get my head around why these birds have all (so far) been in breeding plumage.

cheers]]>

Can you ask her what plumage it has now? I'm trying to get my head around why these birds have all (so far) been in breeding plumage.

cheers]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by Nikki McArthur]]> 2018-10-10T13:06:04+13:00 2018-10-10T13:06:04+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=38021#p38021
Rebecca's just sent through a photo she took of the bird she saw this morning:

_MG_6002.jpg


Cheers,
Nikki

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Rebecca's just sent through a photo she took of the bird she saw this morning:

_MG_6002.jpg


Cheers,
Nikki

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_MG_6002.jpg (454.38 KiB)


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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by sav]]> 2018-10-10T13:14:27+13:00 2018-10-10T13:14:27+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=38023#p38023
cheers]]>

cheers]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by Rebecca Bowater]]> 2018-10-10T13:41:42+13:00 2018-10-10T13:41:42+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=38025#p38025 Rebecca Bowater]]> Rebecca Bowater]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by sav]]> 2018-10-10T14:37:10+13:00 2018-10-10T14:37:10+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=38026#p38026
Thanks, yep, I know what colour it actually is- I just wondered how it came to look so blue in the photo?


cheers]]>

Thanks, yep, I know what colour it actually is- I just wondered how it came to look so blue in the photo?


cheers]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by Nikki McArthur]]> 2018-10-10T15:06:22+13:00 2018-10-10T15:06:22+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=38028#p38028
Have the other birds departed (or gone into hiding to moult?), or have we just stopped reporting them now that everyone's ticked them off?]]>

Have the other birds departed (or gone into hiding to moult?), or have we just stopped reporting them now that everyone's ticked them off?]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by Clinton9]]> 2018-10-10T15:11:13+13:00 2018-10-10T15:11:13+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=38029#p38029 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by David Melville]]> 2018-10-17T22:57:38+13:00 2018-10-17T22:57:38+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=38077#p38077
Peter Field has asked (off line) whether this bird might contribute to the local gene pool, which got me seeing what species Northern Shoveler has hybridised with.

McCarthy in his Handbook of avian hybrids of the world (2006) lists:
North American Wood Duck
Northern Pintail
Common Teal
Cinnamon Teal
Blue-winged Teal
Falcated Teal
Baikal Teal
Mottled Duck
Eurasian Wigeon
Argentine Red Shoveler
Mallard
Garganey
Gadwall
Ferruginous Duck
Muscovy Duck
Ringed Teal

What was interesting is how similar some Northern Shoveler x Blue-winged Teal are to Australasian Shovelers! - e.g. see Dutch Birding 40: 71-81, and posts at Arizona Field Ornithologists.

David]]>

Peter Field has asked (off line) whether this bird might contribute to the local gene pool, which got me seeing what species Northern Shoveler has hybridised with.

McCarthy in his Handbook of avian hybrids of the world (2006) lists:
North American Wood Duck
Northern Pintail
Common Teal
Cinnamon Teal
Blue-winged Teal
Falcated Teal
Baikal Teal
Mottled Duck
Eurasian Wigeon
Argentine Red Shoveler
Mallard
Garganey
Gadwall
Ferruginous Duck
Muscovy Duck
Ringed Teal

What was interesting is how similar some Northern Shoveler x Blue-winged Teal are to Australasian Shovelers! - e.g. see Dutch Birding 40: 71-81, and posts at Arizona Field Ornithologists.

David]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-10-18T00:30:45+13:00 2018-10-18T00:30:45+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=38078#p38078
Image

8670800690_b591f47883_o.jpg

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Image

8670800690_b591f47883_o.jpg

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Northern shoveler, Nelson WTP :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-10-18T07:07:04+13:00 2018-10-18T07:07:04+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7800&p=38079#p38079
Also worth taking note of the female shoveler in the pic Oscar shared--shows the prominent pale outer tail feathers, overall blonde appearance, and orange sides to the bill. Worth keeping an eye out!

Russ]]>

Also worth taking note of the female shoveler in the pic Oscar shared--shows the prominent pale outer tail feathers, overall blonde appearance, and orange sides to the bill. Worth keeping an eye out!

Russ]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: MEGA, but old, news. Laughing Gull in Hawkes Bay :: Author sav]]> 2018-10-18T10:40:33+13:00 2018-10-18T10:40:33+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7977&p=38082#p38082
I have just received photos (via Norway!!??) of an adult breeding plumage LAUGHING GULL at Cape Kidnappers, just South of Napier.

It was on the beach with a few Red-billed Gulls right where the tractor ride finishes at the Cape. Unfortunately this was last Thursday (11th Oct) , so a whole week ago, and it has not been seen since.

But, assumimg this is the same bird that was briefly at Wairoa last Summer, (and Opotiki before that) it must be on the East Coast somewhere - all we have to do is find it!

cheers]]>

I have just received photos (via Norway!!??) of an adult breeding plumage LAUGHING GULL at Cape Kidnappers, just South of Napier.

It was on the beach with a few Red-billed Gulls right where the tractor ride finishes at the Cape. Unfortunately this was last Thursday (11th Oct) , so a whole week ago, and it has not been seen since.

But, assumimg this is the same bird that was briefly at Wairoa last Summer, (and Opotiki before that) it must be on the East Coast somewhere - all we have to do is find it!

cheers]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Cattle Egret - Hawkes Bay :: Author sav]]> 2018-10-18T11:25:40+13:00 2018-10-18T11:25:40+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7978&p=38083#p38083
Late in the season for that, eh?

cheers]]>

Late in the season for that, eh?

cheers]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Kaka in Pukekura Park :: Author palmypaul]]> 2018-10-18T19:22:49+13:00 2018-10-18T19:22:49+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7980&p=38085#p38085 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Southland 24-hour bird race record broken! :: Author Matt Jones]]> 2018-10-18T15:24:14+13:00 2018-10-20T15:48:24+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7979&p=38084#p38084
It was just after midnight when a car parked in a quiet Stewart Island street. Headlights flicked off and four shadowy figures emerged from the car, blending into the darkness. No words were exchanged, just the gentle swoosh of waterproof gear becoming quieter as they disappeared into the bush. Their mission would lead them through primeval forest, across rugged terrain, up steep climbs and head-spinning descents, challenging seas, snow, and whatever else nature could throw at them. And this was just Southland?! What were they up to?

It sounds like an introduction to a murder mystery novel – but it was actually four bird watchers trying to break a record!

About a year before this midnight madness began, esteemed natural historian Lloyd Esler had an article published in The Southland Times about bird watching in New Zealand. In it he referred to two people that were, at that time, the only Southland bird watchers to have seen more than 200 bird species in New Zealand. Winston Cooper (214) and Matt Jones (224). He also referred to a Southland Bird Race. Contrary to what it may sound like, this does not involve pitting a Pukeko against a Mallard in a hundred metre dash! It’s actually an attempt to see as many bird species in a 24-hour period in a given area. The record for the Southland 24-hour bird race was set in 2008 by Russ Cannings (a Canadian bird watcher living in New Zealand) and “Jukka the Finn” (a travelling bird watcher from Finland) at 68 species, although 69 if one bird heard but not seen, was counted.

Reading Lloyd’s article at his Stewart Island home, bird watching guide Matt Jones’ interest was peaked. He made a call to friend and fellow guide, Neil Robertson in Te Anau. Neil agreed that they should attempt the Southland 24-hour bird race, and two more bird watchers were swiftly recruited. Shawn Herron, also Te Anau-based nature guide and Phil Rhodes, bird recorder for Ornithological Society of New Zealand (OSNZ) based in Invercargill. A formidable team!

There aren’t many rules for bird racing and much of it is based on honesty. See as many bird species as you can in a 24-hour period. This group decided they would not count birds heard, only those that were seen, and only count those seen by the majority of the group, so at least three of the four; and they would start at one minute past midnight through to midnight.

So, back to the shadowy figures in the darkness at Stewart Island where Matt led the group to a site for Stewart Island Brown Kiwi (Tokoeka). At twenty minutes past midnight the group witnessed a family of four birds; male, female, juvenile and chick. New Zealand’s icon was Bird #1 on the list! A further two female kiwi joined the party and flushed a Skylark out of the long grass; Bird #2. An unexpected bird at this point in the proceedings, but welcome nonetheless.

On the way back to the car, Morepork was heard but not seen nor counted and the group decided to get some sleep ready for a 5am start the next morning. Hot showers, coffee and bacon sarnies kicked the morning off, and from Matt’s house in the treetops, Bellbird and Tui were seen. Birds #3 and #4 on the list.

Down to Halfmoon Bay for a scan of the foreshore produced Variable Oystercatcher, Paradise Shelduck, Red-billed and Kelp Gulls, Chaffinches and Starlings feeding on the beach. Song Thrush, Blackbird and Dunnock were found around the township. Onwards to Mill Creek for the only chance to see Sacred Kingfisher – got it!

By now the dawn chorus was tuning up and light improving. New Zealand Pigeon/Kereru in a tree beside the road; Kaka and Red-crowned Kakariki flew overhead; a male South Island Tomtit landed beside the car.

Redpoll feeding in small bush at Butterfield Beach; White-fronted Tern and Spotted Shag at Horseshoe Bay; Grey Warbler in Fuchsia bush near the beach. Local knowledge was key here because Matt knew where a pair of Fiordland Crested Penguins were and they were seen in the scope; at Lee Bay a Fantail hopped around as Foveaux Shag swam just offshore.

Mallard and House Sparrow were spotted on the drive to Golden Bay Wharf and by 8am the group were meeting Chris for the seven minute water taxi crossing to Ulva Island. They had just two hours to see as many endemics as possible. Stewart Island Weka on the beach; Pied Shag sitting offshore; the distinctive call of a stunning South Island Saddleback brought attention back to the tree canopy and the bird count up to Bird #28.

With ears tuned to every whistle and call on Ulva Island, Brown Creeper (Pipipi), Stewart Island Robin, Yellow-crowned Parakeet and Yellowhead were on the list before reaching Boulder Beach. One of the challenges of a bird race is to tick and keep moving which doesn’t come easily when a Weka is at your feet demanding attention, but it was already on the list! On the rocks were White-faced Heron and Little Pied Shag.

Logistics for the bird race had been planned meticulously and the two hours on Ulva Island whizzed by. Chris had the water taxi ready to shuttle the group from Ulva Island onto the waiting Aurora Australis skippered by Ty for a pelagic en route to Bluff.

Heading towards Bench Island NZ White-capped Albatross and Little Blue Penguin were spotted plus an incredible sighting of a single Yellow-eyed Penguin leaving thick vegetation to walk into plain view on the beach as the boat steamed past. A circumnavigation of Bench Island provided Northern Giant Petrel and Southern Brown Skua; Bird #42.

Allowing themselves a short time to photograph and admire Buller’s and Salvin’s Albatross, more Fiordland Crested Penguin appeared as did Sooty Shearwater and Cape Petrel. Binoculars in one hand and a coffee in the other to keep focused and alert, a surprise squeak overhead revealed Black-fronted Tern, a bird expected later in the day (inland/on braided rivers) but it was a tick!

Bird #49 was a Fairy Prion which flew away quickly but not before being spotted by the Southern Brown Skua. Aerial combat ensued and all the will in the world could not prevent the inevitable thwack and puff of white feathers as Bird #42 killed and devoured #49. Among the Sooties was Bird #50 a Short-tailed Shearwater, and the boat had not even reached the mainland.

The delicate Welcome Swallow was an apt Bird #51 on arrival at Bluff around 1.30pm. A hasty bakery lunch was gathered and consumed leaving a dusting of pie crumbs in Neil’s car. Bluff highway blurred past the windows slowing down only to focus on the feeding Greenfinches, Pukeko, Australasian Magpie and Feral Pigeon. Incredibly no Australasian Harrier!

Next destination was Tip Lagoon in Invercargill and Goldfinch calls gave their presence away easily. Black Swan, Royal Spoonbill, Grey Teal, New Zealand Scaup, Australasian Shoveler, Pied Stilt. Phil’s local knowledge paid off here and a small island on other side of lagoon presented Black Shag, Caspian Tern, three Australasian Shelducks (aka Chestnut-breasted). This Australian vagrant had been hanging around the lagoon for a year, occasionally up to six birds showing, but only one was needed for the race. South Island Pied Oystercatcher (aka S.I.P.O.) and two distant harriers were spotted. Bar-tailed Godwit was next and then Black-billed Gull sitting on a post.

Tip Lagoon delivered 14 species in an hour. The female Chestnut Teal that had been reported the previous week was conspicuous in its absence. Quantity not quality. More importantly the record had just been broken! Black-billed Gull on a post was Bird #70. High fives, pats on the back and then a serious discussion. Again local knowledge came into play; Shawn and Neil said that snow had closed the Milford Road the day before. Was three hours driving worth doing for a possible one or two more species, or spend less time driving and more time birding? The latter was agreed upon and Awarua Bay was the place to go.

The tide was coming in and provided perfect wader spotting at this Southland hotspot. A group of 30 small waders flew overhead calling; Ruddy Turnstone was Bird #71. A walk along the foreshore dodging a Double-banded Plover with tiny chicks and scopes scanned a flock of Godwit to pick out Red Knot.

Look behind you! Birds #74 and #75 came in quick succession; two Wrybill fed happily in the kelp and Shawn got us our only New Zealand Pipit of the day. Neil spotted a distant flock of birds, tide lapping at their bellies but which way were they going to move? Towards the binoculars! Five Pacific Golden Plovers were a real bonus that hadn’t even been considered as a possibility and Bird #76 joined the list.

Around 4.30pm after a fruitless search for Fernbird in the flax it was onwards to Te Anau. Along the way lambs lay in the snow and Black-billed Gull and Black-fronted Tern were seen but already ticked. At Kays near the Mararoa River Matt spotted a distant pair of Canadian Geese but he needn’t have worried as more sat on the river bank around the corner.

It was a bitterly cold drive beside the lake in Te Anau, light was fading but at 8pm an Australasian Crested Grebe swam towards the shore. Bird #78!

At Neil’s house, celebratory pizza and beer were devoured by the new record holders. Attempts to attract moths and bugs to the house lights outside in the hope of seeing Morepork failed, they were heard but not seen.

Midnight approached. The adrenaline rush of the day began to wane, discussion drifted towards the thrill of birding with mates, the camaraderie, replaying every one of the 78 birds seen, and finally the species that hadn’t been ticked. Yellowhammer was seen by twice but both times by only two of the group and therefore not counted. Silvereye was heard on Ulva Island but not seen and therefore not counted. It could have been a total of 80 if they were counting hearing birds as well as seeing them. And Southern Royal Albatross never appeared at all.

Russ Cannings, previous record-holder of the Southland 24-hour bird race, was among the first to congratulate the group on their success with a very congenial late night text message:
“Booyah! An impressive effort and that’s stellar getting everyone onto everything. The Southland Crown returns to its rightful home!”

The next morning snow flurries swirled in Neil’s garden and the smell of bacon and eggs wafted around the kitchen. Silvereyes fed happily on sugar water outside. Ain’t that just the way. Mugs of hot tea were sipped and Silvereyes were observed leisurely for their beauty. And not ticked.

Matt, Neil, Phil and Shawn would like to thank Ange at Beaks & Feathers; Ulva at Ulva’s Guided Walks; Chris & Matt at Rakiura Charters & Water Taxi; Ty & Riki at Jenkinson Marine, and Matt’s partner Jules for serving up a roasted bird for dinner the night before the big race! Without the generosity of these people, the day would not have been possible.

Birds in order of appearance:
1. Stewart Island Brown Kiwi – six birds!
2. Skylark
3. NZ Bellbird
4. Tui
5. Blackbird
6. Starling
7. Red-billed Gull
8. Chaffinch
9. Variable Oystercatcher
10. Kelp Gull
11. Paradise Shelduck
12. Dunnock
13. Song Thrush
14. Sacred Kingfisher
15. NZ Pigeon
16. Red-crowned Parakeet
17. South Island Tomtit
18. Kaka
19. Redpoll
20. Grey Warbler
21. White-fronted Tern
22. Spotted Shag
23. Mallard
24. Foveaux Shag
25. Fiordland Crested Penguin
26. NZ Fantail
27. House Sparrow
28. South Island Saddleback
29. Brown Creeper / Pipipi
30. Pied Shag
31. Rifleman
32. Little Pied Shag
33. Yellow-crowned Parakeet
34. Yellowhead
35. Stewart Island Weka
36. Stewart Island Robin
37. White-faced Heron
38. White-capped Albatross
39. Little Blue Penguin
40. Yellow-eyed Penguin
41. Northern Giant Petrel
42. Southern Brown Skua
43. Common Diving Petrel
44. Buller’s Albatross
45. Cape Petrel
46. Salvin’s Albatross
47. Sooty Shearwater
48. Black-fronted Tern
49. Fairy Prion
50. Short-tailed Shearwater
51. Welcome Swallow
52. Greenfinch
53. Australasian Magpie
54. Pukeko
55. Spur-winged Plover
56. Feral Pigeon
57. Goldfinch
58. Black Swan
59. Royal Spoonbill
60. Australasian Shoveler
61. Grey Teal
62. Pied Stilt
63. NZ Scaup
64. Australasian Swamp Harrier
65. Black Shag
66. South Island Pied Oystercatcher
67. Caspian Tern
68. Australian Shelduck / Chestnut-breasted Shelduck – three birds
69. Bar-tailed Godwit
70. Black-billed Gull
71. Ruddy Turnstone
72. Banded Dotterel
73. Red Knot
74. Wrybill – two birds
75. NZ Pipit
76. Pacific Golden Plover
77. Canada Goose
78. Australasian Crested Grebe
Morepork and Silvereye heard but not seen / not counted.

Attachments


The team!
CD151IMG_2906.jpg (245.86 KiB)
The team!

Southern Brown Skua eating Fairy Prion
CD151IMG_4304.jpg (242.12 KiB)
Southern Brown Skua eating Fairy Prion

Wrybill
CD151IMG_4505.jpg (239.52 KiB)
Wrybill

]]>

It was just after midnight when a car parked in a quiet Stewart Island street. Headlights flicked off and four shadowy figures emerged from the car, blending into the darkness. No words were exchanged, just the gentle swoosh of waterproof gear becoming quieter as they disappeared into the bush. Their mission would lead them through primeval forest, across rugged terrain, up steep climbs and head-spinning descents, challenging seas, snow, and whatever else nature could throw at them. And this was just Southland?! What were they up to?

It sounds like an introduction to a murder mystery novel – but it was actually four bird watchers trying to break a record!

About a year before this midnight madness began, esteemed natural historian Lloyd Esler had an article published in The Southland Times about bird watching in New Zealand. In it he referred to two people that were, at that time, the only Southland bird watchers to have seen more than 200 bird species in New Zealand. Winston Cooper (214) and Matt Jones (224). He also referred to a Southland Bird Race. Contrary to what it may sound like, this does not involve pitting a Pukeko against a Mallard in a hundred metre dash! It’s actually an attempt to see as many bird species in a 24-hour period in a given area. The record for the Southland 24-hour bird race was set in 2008 by Russ Cannings (a Canadian bird watcher living in New Zealand) and “Jukka the Finn” (a travelling bird watcher from Finland) at 68 species, although 69 if one bird heard but not seen, was counted.

Reading Lloyd’s article at his Stewart Island home, bird watching guide Matt Jones’ interest was peaked. He made a call to friend and fellow guide, Neil Robertson in Te Anau. Neil agreed that they should attempt the Southland 24-hour bird race, and two more bird watchers were swiftly recruited. Shawn Herron, also Te Anau-based nature guide and Phil Rhodes, bird recorder for Ornithological Society of New Zealand (OSNZ) based in Invercargill. A formidable team!

There aren’t many rules for bird racing and much of it is based on honesty. See as many bird species as you can in a 24-hour period. This group decided they would not count birds heard, only those that were seen, and only count those seen by the majority of the group, so at least three of the four; and they would start at one minute past midnight through to midnight.

So, back to the shadowy figures in the darkness at Stewart Island where Matt led the group to a site for Stewart Island Brown Kiwi (Tokoeka). At twenty minutes past midnight the group witnessed a family of four birds; male, female, juvenile and chick. New Zealand’s icon was Bird #1 on the list! A further two female kiwi joined the party and flushed a Skylark out of the long grass; Bird #2. An unexpected bird at this point in the proceedings, but welcome nonetheless.

On the way back to the car, Morepork was heard but not seen nor counted and the group decided to get some sleep ready for a 5am start the next morning. Hot showers, coffee and bacon sarnies kicked the morning off, and from Matt’s house in the treetops, Bellbird and Tui were seen. Birds #3 and #4 on the list.

Down to Halfmoon Bay for a scan of the foreshore produced Variable Oystercatcher, Paradise Shelduck, Red-billed and Kelp Gulls, Chaffinches and Starlings feeding on the beach. Song Thrush, Blackbird and Dunnock were found around the township. Onwards to Mill Creek for the only chance to see Sacred Kingfisher – got it!

By now the dawn chorus was tuning up and light improving. New Zealand Pigeon/Kereru in a tree beside the road; Kaka and Red-crowned Kakariki flew overhead; a male South Island Tomtit landed beside the car.

Redpoll feeding in small bush at Butterfield Beach; White-fronted Tern and Spotted Shag at Horseshoe Bay; Grey Warbler in Fuchsia bush near the beach. Local knowledge was key here because Matt knew where a pair of Fiordland Crested Penguins were and they were seen in the scope; at Lee Bay a Fantail hopped around as Foveaux Shag swam just offshore.

Mallard and House Sparrow were spotted on the drive to Golden Bay Wharf and by 8am the group were meeting Chris for the seven minute water taxi crossing to Ulva Island. They had just two hours to see as many endemics as possible. Stewart Island Weka on the beach; Pied Shag sitting offshore; the distinctive call of a stunning South Island Saddleback brought attention back to the tree canopy and the bird count up to Bird #28.

With ears tuned to every whistle and call on Ulva Island, Brown Creeper (Pipipi), Stewart Island Robin, Yellow-crowned Parakeet and Yellowhead were on the list before reaching Boulder Beach. One of the challenges of a bird race is to tick and keep moving which doesn’t come easily when a Weka is at your feet demanding attention, but it was already on the list! On the rocks were White-faced Heron and Little Pied Shag.

Logistics for the bird race had been planned meticulously and the two hours on Ulva Island whizzed by. Chris had the water taxi ready to shuttle the group from Ulva Island onto the waiting Aurora Australis skippered by Ty for a pelagic en route to Bluff.

Heading towards Bench Island NZ White-capped Albatross and Little Blue Penguin were spotted plus an incredible sighting of a single Yellow-eyed Penguin leaving thick vegetation to walk into plain view on the beach as the boat steamed past. A circumnavigation of Bench Island provided Northern Giant Petrel and Southern Brown Skua; Bird #42.

Allowing themselves a short time to photograph and admire Buller’s and Salvin’s Albatross, more Fiordland Crested Penguin appeared as did Sooty Shearwater and Cape Petrel. Binoculars in one hand and a coffee in the other to keep focused and alert, a surprise squeak overhead revealed Black-fronted Tern, a bird expected later in the day (inland/on braided rivers) but it was a tick!

Bird #49 was a Fairy Prion which flew away quickly but not before being spotted by the Southern Brown Skua. Aerial combat ensued and all the will in the world could not prevent the inevitable thwack and puff of white feathers as Bird #42 killed and devoured #49. Among the Sooties was Bird #50 a Short-tailed Shearwater, and the boat had not even reached the mainland.

The delicate Welcome Swallow was an apt Bird #51 on arrival at Bluff around 1.30pm. A hasty bakery lunch was gathered and consumed leaving a dusting of pie crumbs in Neil’s car. Bluff highway blurred past the windows slowing down only to focus on the feeding Greenfinches, Pukeko, Australasian Magpie and Feral Pigeon. Incredibly no Australasian Harrier!

Next destination was Tip Lagoon in Invercargill and Goldfinch calls gave their presence away easily. Black Swan, Royal Spoonbill, Grey Teal, New Zealand Scaup, Australasian Shoveler, Pied Stilt. Phil’s local knowledge paid off here and a small island on other side of lagoon presented Black Shag, Caspian Tern, three Australasian Shelducks (aka Chestnut-breasted). This Australian vagrant had been hanging around the lagoon for a year, occasionally up to six birds showing, but only one was needed for the race. South Island Pied Oystercatcher (aka S.I.P.O.) and two distant harriers were spotted. Bar-tailed Godwit was next and then Black-billed Gull sitting on a post.

Tip Lagoon delivered 14 species in an hour. The female Chestnut Teal that had been reported the previous week was conspicuous in its absence. Quantity not quality. More importantly the record had just been broken! Black-billed Gull on a post was Bird #70. High fives, pats on the back and then a serious discussion. Again local knowledge came into play; Shawn and Neil said that snow had closed the Milford Road the day before. Was three hours driving worth doing for a possible one or two more species, or spend less time driving and more time birding? The latter was agreed upon and Awarua Bay was the place to go.

The tide was coming in and provided perfect wader spotting at this Southland hotspot. A group of 30 small waders flew overhead calling; Ruddy Turnstone was Bird #71. A walk along the foreshore dodging a Double-banded Plover with tiny chicks and scopes scanned a flock of Godwit to pick out Red Knot.

Look behind you! Birds #74 and #75 came in quick succession; two Wrybill fed happily in the kelp and Shawn got us our only New Zealand Pipit of the day. Neil spotted a distant flock of birds, tide lapping at their bellies but which way were they going to move? Towards the binoculars! Five Pacific Golden Plovers were a real bonus that hadn’t even been considered as a possibility and Bird #76 joined the list.

Around 4.30pm after a fruitless search for Fernbird in the flax it was onwards to Te Anau. Along the way lambs lay in the snow and Black-billed Gull and Black-fronted Tern were seen but already ticked. At Kays near the Mararoa River Matt spotted a distant pair of Canadian Geese but he needn’t have worried as more sat on the river bank around the corner.

It was a bitterly cold drive beside the lake in Te Anau, light was fading but at 8pm an Australasian Crested Grebe swam towards the shore. Bird #78!

At Neil’s house, celebratory pizza and beer were devoured by the new record holders. Attempts to attract moths and bugs to the house lights outside in the hope of seeing Morepork failed, they were heard but not seen.

Midnight approached. The adrenaline rush of the day began to wane, discussion drifted towards the thrill of birding with mates, the camaraderie, replaying every one of the 78 birds seen, and finally the species that hadn’t been ticked. Yellowhammer was seen by twice but both times by only two of the group and therefore not counted. Silvereye was heard on Ulva Island but not seen and therefore not counted. It could have been a total of 80 if they were counting hearing birds as well as seeing them. And Southern Royal Albatross never appeared at all.

Russ Cannings, previous record-holder of the Southland 24-hour bird race, was among the first to congratulate the group on their success with a very congenial late night text message:
“Booyah! An impressive effort and that’s stellar getting everyone onto everything. The Southland Crown returns to its rightful home!”

The next morning snow flurries swirled in Neil’s garden and the smell of bacon and eggs wafted around the kitchen. Silvereyes fed happily on sugar water outside. Ain’t that just the way. Mugs of hot tea were sipped and Silvereyes were observed leisurely for their beauty. And not ticked.

Matt, Neil, Phil and Shawn would like to thank Ange at Beaks & Feathers; Ulva at Ulva’s Guided Walks; Chris & Matt at Rakiura Charters & Water Taxi; Ty & Riki at Jenkinson Marine, and Matt’s partner Jules for serving up a roasted bird for dinner the night before the big race! Without the generosity of these people, the day would not have been possible.

Birds in order of appearance:
1. Stewart Island Brown Kiwi – six birds!
2. Skylark
3. NZ Bellbird
4. Tui
5. Blackbird
6. Starling
7. Red-billed Gull
8. Chaffinch
9. Variable Oystercatcher
10. Kelp Gull
11. Paradise Shelduck
12. Dunnock
13. Song Thrush
14. Sacred Kingfisher
15. NZ Pigeon
16. Red-crowned Parakeet
17. South Island Tomtit
18. Kaka
19. Redpoll
20. Grey Warbler
21. White-fronted Tern
22. Spotted Shag
23. Mallard
24. Foveaux Shag
25. Fiordland Crested Penguin
26. NZ Fantail
27. House Sparrow
28. South Island Saddleback
29. Brown Creeper / Pipipi
30. Pied Shag
31. Rifleman
32. Little Pied Shag
33. Yellow-crowned Parakeet
34. Yellowhead
35. Stewart Island Weka
36. Stewart Island Robin
37. White-faced Heron
38. White-capped Albatross
39. Little Blue Penguin
40. Yellow-eyed Penguin
41. Northern Giant Petrel
42. Southern Brown Skua
43. Common Diving Petrel
44. Buller’s Albatross
45. Cape Petrel
46. Salvin’s Albatross
47. Sooty Shearwater
48. Black-fronted Tern
49. Fairy Prion
50. Short-tailed Shearwater
51. Welcome Swallow
52. Greenfinch
53. Australasian Magpie
54. Pukeko
55. Spur-winged Plover
56. Feral Pigeon
57. Goldfinch
58. Black Swan
59. Royal Spoonbill
60. Australasian Shoveler
61. Grey Teal
62. Pied Stilt
63. NZ Scaup
64. Australasian Swamp Harrier
65. Black Shag
66. South Island Pied Oystercatcher
67. Caspian Tern
68. Australian Shelduck / Chestnut-breasted Shelduck – three birds
69. Bar-tailed Godwit
70. Black-billed Gull
71. Ruddy Turnstone
72. Banded Dotterel
73. Red Knot
74. Wrybill – two birds
75. NZ Pipit
76. Pacific Golden Plover
77. Canada Goose
78. Australasian Crested Grebe
Morepork and Silvereye heard but not seen / not counted.

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The team!
CD151IMG_2906.jpg (245.86 KiB)
The team!

Southern Brown Skua eating Fairy Prion
CD151IMG_4304.jpg (242.12 KiB)
Southern Brown Skua eating Fairy Prion

Wrybill
CD151IMG_4505.jpg (239.52 KiB)
Wrybill

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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Southland 24-hour bird race record broken! :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-10-18T19:33:10+13:00 2018-10-18T19:33:10+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7979&p=38086#p38086
Certainly shows off the tremendous diversity of Southland. Lucky to have a "ride" to Bluff!

Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>

Certainly shows off the tremendous diversity of Southland. Lucky to have a "ride" to Bluff!

Russ C
Morrinsville, NZ]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington to Turangi Big Day - 70 Species :: Reply by zarkov]]> 2018-10-18T20:18:14+13:00 2018-10-18T20:18:14+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6167&p=38087#p38087
It was so unusual to be able to watch them flying so freely when the usual view is of a Bittern disappearing over the horizon.

They're great fliers, and in the right conditions could soar without difficulty.

Felt so lucky my regular visits paid such a dividend,]]>

It was so unusual to be able to watch them flying so freely when the usual view is of a Bittern disappearing over the horizon.

They're great fliers, and in the right conditions could soar without difficulty.

Felt so lucky my regular visits paid such a dividend,]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington to Turangi Big Day - 70 Species :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-10-18T21:01:00+13:00 2018-10-18T21:01:00+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6167&p=38088#p38088 Cheers Jim]]> Cheers Jim]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Wellington to Turangi Big Day - 70 Species :: Reply by chris]]> 2018-10-19T10:27:18+13:00 2018-10-19T10:27:18+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6167&p=38090#p38090 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Unahi Road Winter Sightings :: Reply by Carol]]> 2018-10-21T09:01:53+13:00 2018-10-21T09:01:53+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7864&p=38104#p38104 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Mute Swan, Bromley Oxidation Ponds :: Author Davidthomas]]> 2018-10-20T18:13:06+13:00 2018-10-20T18:13:06+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7983&p=38095#p38095
Not as exciting as a chestnut teal! But there’s been a mute swan hanging around on the Bromley oxidation ponds in Christchurch for the last week or so, and has been showing well on Dyers road. It’s rather unusual to actually see them in the city, although they’re very reliable on Lake Ellesmere and north in the Pegasus wetlands.

Thanks for the heads up Paul G.]]>

Not as exciting as a chestnut teal! But there’s been a mute swan hanging around on the Bromley oxidation ponds in Christchurch for the last week or so, and has been showing well on Dyers road. It’s rather unusual to actually see them in the city, although they’re very reliable on Lake Ellesmere and north in the Pegasus wetlands.

Thanks for the heads up Paul G.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Mute Swan, Bromley Oxidation Ponds :: Reply by Bev Alexander]]> 2018-10-20T20:37:15+13:00 2018-10-20T20:37:15+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7983&p=38098#p38098
There has be a Mute Swan at the Ashley Estuary, hanging out with Black swans, a Canada goose & 1 Feral goose.

Cheers. Bev.]]>

There has be a Mute Swan at the Ashley Estuary, hanging out with Black swans, a Canada goose & 1 Feral goose.

Cheers. Bev.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Mute Swan, Bromley Oxidation Ponds :: Reply by Davidthomas]]> 2018-10-20T21:38:10+13:00 2018-10-20T21:38:10+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7983&p=38100#p38100 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Mute Swan, Bromley Oxidation Ponds :: Reply by Grahame]]> 2018-10-21T09:57:51+13:00 2018-10-21T09:57:51+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7983&p=38105#p38105 Grahame]]> Grahame]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Mute Swan, Bromley Oxidation Ponds :: Reply by GrahameNZ]]> 2018-10-21T12:27:52+13:00 2018-10-21T12:27:52+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7983&p=38106#p38106 This or less likely another bird has been around for several months.
It usually lurks up the top end of this pond (the SE one) so is only a distant white blob.
Was showing itself nicely this morning when I went for a Tern hunt.

Mute-Swan_GNZ20181021-3187.jpg


Mute-Swan_GNZ20181021-3213.jpg

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Mute-Swan_GNZ20181021-3187.jpg (101.94 KiB)



Mute-Swan_GNZ20181021-3213.jpg (84.54 KiB)


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This or less likely another bird has been around for several months.
It usually lurks up the top end of this pond (the SE one) so is only a distant white blob.
Was showing itself nicely this morning when I went for a Tern hunt.

Mute-Swan_GNZ20181021-3187.jpg


Mute-Swan_GNZ20181021-3213.jpg

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Mute-Swan_GNZ20181021-3187.jpg (101.94 KiB)



Mute-Swan_GNZ20181021-3213.jpg (84.54 KiB)


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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Royal Spoonbills at Unahi near Awanui, Far North :: Reply by Carol]]> 2018-10-21T07:07:24+13:00 2018-10-21T07:07:24+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=1988&p=38103#p38103 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Royal Spoonbills at Unahi near Awanui, Far North :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-10-21T13:34:04+13:00 2018-10-21T13:34:04+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=1988&p=38108#p38108 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Glossy Ibis, Hauraki :: Reply by igor]]> 2018-10-06T20:59:48+13:00 2018-10-06T20:59:48+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7883&p=37982#p37982 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Glossy Ibis, Hauraki :: Reply by phil hammond]]> 2018-10-21T15:00:26+13:00 2018-10-21T15:00:26+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7883&p=38109#p38109
The Marsh Sand was still there and PGPs have arrived but no sign of the Ibis or egrets

Bar-tailed Godwits-------980
Red Knots------------------29
Pacific Golden Plovers---22
Pied Stilts [inc' hybrids]--c320
SIPO-------------------------19
Caspian Terns--------------4
Royal Spoonbills-----------2
Marsh Sandpiper-----------1
Wrybill----------------------0 !
plus plenty of WF Herons, Masked Lapwings, Ducks etc all not counted

Phil Hammond
Wrybill Birding Tours NZ
Great Birds, Real Birders]]>

The Marsh Sand was still there and PGPs have arrived but no sign of the Ibis or egrets

Bar-tailed Godwits-------980
Red Knots------------------29
Pacific Golden Plovers---22
Pied Stilts [inc' hybrids]--c320
SIPO-------------------------19
Caspian Terns--------------4
Royal Spoonbills-----------2
Marsh Sandpiper-----------1
Wrybill----------------------0 !
plus plenty of WF Herons, Masked Lapwings, Ducks etc all not counted

Phil Hammond
Wrybill Birding Tours NZ
Great Birds, Real Birders]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Immature drake chestnut teal, Tip Lagoon, Invercargill :: Author sjacques]]> 2018-10-19T22:59:48+13:00 2018-10-19T22:59:48+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7982&p=38092#p38092
There is a very good match for this bird in the photos on the chestnut teal page on nz birds online.

Scattered dark green feathering on head, densest on crown, warm chestnut breast, black tail with white patches at rear flanks. Dark folded tertiary roughly matching colour of upper tail. Similar size to grey teal and also similar wing pattern when seen in flight.

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Chestnut 2 19-10-18.jpg (84.77 KiB)


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There is a very good match for this bird in the photos on the chestnut teal page on nz birds online.

Scattered dark green feathering on head, densest on crown, warm chestnut breast, black tail with white patches at rear flanks. Dark folded tertiary roughly matching colour of upper tail. Similar size to grey teal and also similar wing pattern when seen in flight.

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Chestnut 2 19-10-18.jpg (84.77 KiB)


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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Immature drake chestnut teal, Tip Lagoon, Invercargill :: Reply by Steve Wood]]> 2018-10-20T07:42:46+13:00 2018-10-20T07:42:46+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7982&p=38093#p38093 Well done.]]> Well done.]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Immature drake chestnut teal, Tip Lagoon, Invercargill :: Reply by sjacques]]> 2018-10-20T15:10:46+13:00 2018-10-20T15:10:46+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7982&p=38094#p38094 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Immature drake chestnut teal, Tip Lagoon, Invercargill :: Reply by sjacques]]> 2018-10-20T21:13:32+13:00 2018-10-20T21:13:32+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7982&p=38099#p38099

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Chestnut 2 quacking.jpg (296.07 KiB)



chesnut 2 20-10-18.jpg (141.54 KiB)


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Chestnut 2 quacking.jpg (296.07 KiB)



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<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Immature drake chestnut teal, Tip Lagoon, Invercargill :: Reply by Davidthomas]]> 2018-10-20T21:40:00+13:00 2018-10-20T21:40:00+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7982&p=38101#p38101 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Immature drake chestnut teal, Tip Lagoon, Invercargill :: Reply by sav]]> 2018-10-21T18:44:42+13:00 2018-10-21T18:44:42+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7982&p=38110#p38110
I think it looks good too. And it adds to the credentials of the possible female at the same site. I saw the first ever accepted Chestnut Teal in NZ and it looked like a watered down version of this rather convincing individual.

BUT.... I still think we need to tread carefully. Some of the features that were "good" for the female are absolutely absent from this bird. Take a look at the head shape of both?? And ducks do that interbreeding thing that just messes everything up.....]]>

I think it looks good too. And it adds to the credentials of the possible female at the same site. I saw the first ever accepted Chestnut Teal in NZ and it looked like a watered down version of this rather convincing individual.

BUT.... I still think we need to tread carefully. Some of the features that were "good" for the female are absolutely absent from this bird. Take a look at the head shape of both?? And ducks do that interbreeding thing that just messes everything up.....]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Drake Northern shoveler and chestnut teal, Invercargill tip lagoon :: Author sjacques]]> 2018-10-21T12:59:32+13:00 2018-10-21T12:59:32+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7984&p=38107#p38107 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Drake Northern shoveler and chestnut teal, Invercargill tip lagoon :: Reply by Phil Rhodes]]> 2018-10-21T20:52:02+13:00 2018-10-21T20:52:02+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7984&p=38111#p38111 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-09-23T09:13:03+12:00 2018-09-23T09:13:03+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37865#p37865 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by ourspot]]> 2018-09-23T09:30:55+12:00 2018-09-23T09:30:55+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37866#p37866 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-09-23T11:29:22+12:00 2018-09-23T11:29:22+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37867#p37867
Thanks for doing the work for me! Will have to look into LTs as well.

Went out to Te Aroha yesterday and patrolled the totara groves along the Paiko/Morrinsville greenbelt today. Still no cuckoos! 7 broods of Grey Teal at Howarth Memorial Wetlands and a nest building bellbird at the Te Aroha domain were neat spring consolations.]]>

Thanks for doing the work for me! Will have to look into LTs as well.

Went out to Te Aroha yesterday and patrolled the totara groves along the Paiko/Morrinsville greenbelt today. Still no cuckoos! 7 broods of Grey Teal at Howarth Memorial Wetlands and a nest building bellbird at the Te Aroha domain were neat spring consolations.]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Cheryl Walton]]> 2018-09-23T12:48:21+12:00 2018-09-23T12:48:21+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37868#p37868 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-09-23T14:36:56+12:00 2018-09-23T14:36:56+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37869#p37869
cheers
Jim]]>

cheers
Jim]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-09-23T18:37:58+12:00 2018-09-23T18:37:58+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37870#p37870 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by GrahamB]]> 2018-09-24T17:29:11+12:00 2018-09-24T17:29:11+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37883#p37883 ]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Jake]]> 2018-09-25T23:05:29+12:00 2018-09-25T23:05:29+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37896#p37896 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Richard Schofield]]> 2018-09-29T12:55:35+12:00 2018-09-29T12:55:35+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37923#p37923 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-09-30T14:24:13+13:00 2018-09-30T14:24:13+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37931#p37931 Hopefully that ex tropical cyclone that hit at the end of summer didn't result in mass casualties to migrating birds....

cheers
jim]]>
Hopefully that ex tropical cyclone that hit at the end of summer didn't result in mass casualties to migrating birds....

cheers
jim]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by fras444]]> 2018-10-01T15:59:07+13:00 2018-10-01T15:59:07+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37939#p37939 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by rukuhia]]> 2018-10-01T17:42:08+13:00 2018-10-01T17:42:08+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37941#p37941 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Joanna10]]> 2018-10-04T19:51:41+13:00 2018-10-04T19:51:41+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37958#p37958 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Steve Wood]]> 2018-10-05T07:50:39+13:00 2018-10-05T07:50:39+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37962#p37962 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Liam Ballard]]> 2018-10-05T08:18:20+13:00 2018-10-05T08:18:20+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37963#p37963 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by SueCourtney]]> 2018-10-05T18:49:23+13:00 2018-10-05T18:49:23+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37969#p37969 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Ben Volpicelli]]> 2018-10-06T14:57:04+13:00 2018-10-06T14:57:04+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37979#p37979 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-10-06T18:06:48+13:00 2018-10-06T18:06:48+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37980#p37980
Russ]]>

Russ]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Mike Vincent]]> 2018-10-07T13:06:30+13:00 2018-10-07T13:06:30+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37988#p37988 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Les Feasey]]> 2018-10-08T07:21:15+13:00 2018-10-08T07:21:15+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=37992#p37992 One at home and a second at a lake near Pakaraka. Three years ago it was August 24.]]> One at home and a second at a lake near Pakaraka. Three years ago it was August 24.]]> <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Nakilad]]> 2018-10-08T21:06:52+13:00 2018-10-08T21:06:52+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=38000#p38000 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by ashercook]]> 2018-10-09T08:13:22+13:00 2018-10-09T08:13:22+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=38003#p38003 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-10-17T14:54:50+13:00 2018-10-17T14:54:50+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=38071#p38071 Is anyone else noticing no or a lot fewer birds around?

cheers
Jim]]>
Is anyone else noticing no or a lot fewer birds around?

cheers
Jim]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by David Riddell]]> 2018-10-18T08:28:04+13:00 2018-10-18T08:28:04+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=38080#p38080 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Ben Volpicelli]]> 2018-10-18T09:13:45+13:00 2018-10-18T09:13:45+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=38081#p38081 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Colin Miskelly]]> 2018-10-20T19:34:45+13:00 2018-10-20T19:34:45+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=38096#p38096
Cheers
Colin]]>

Cheers
Colin]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Michael Szabo]]> 2018-10-20T19:58:19+13:00 2018-10-20T19:58:19+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=38097#p38097 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Colin Miskelly]]> 2018-10-22T15:31:26+13:00 2018-10-22T15:31:26+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=38112#p38112
Between counts I had another great sighting of an apparently courting cuckoo pair. I was attracted by a full song from a pine just outside the eastern fenceline. One of the birds flew about 40 away to another pine, then a short time later flew back (towards me) with shallow fluttering wing beats (rather like a courting swallow), then hopped around the other bird with head raised, tail cocked, and wing-tips drooped below normal, while giving the downward-slurred note. Unfortunately they then flew into dense vegetation, so my voyeurism was terminated.

Cheers
Colin]]>

Between counts I had another great sighting of an apparently courting cuckoo pair. I was attracted by a full song from a pine just outside the eastern fenceline. One of the birds flew about 40 away to another pine, then a short time later flew back (towards me) with shallow fluttering wing beats (rather like a courting swallow), then hopped around the other bird with head raised, tail cocked, and wing-tips drooped below normal, while giving the downward-slurred note. Unfortunately they then flew into dense vegetation, so my voyeurism was terminated.

Cheers
Colin]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by CMKMStephens]]> 2018-10-22T17:11:01+13:00 2018-10-22T17:11:01+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=38113#p38113 <![CDATA[Bird Sightings and Alerts :: Re: Shining Cuckoos 2018 :: Reply by Jim_j]]> 2018-10-22T18:24:58+13:00 2018-10-22T18:24:58+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7914&p=38114#p38114
Cheers Jim]]>

Cheers Jim]]>
<![CDATA[Birding Events :: Re: eBird Global Big Day - 6th October 2018 :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-09-24T18:11:24+12:00 2018-09-24T18:11:24+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7940&p=37886#p37886 Russ]]> Russ]]> <![CDATA[Birding Events :: Re: Chatham Island :: Reply by harryhatman]]> 2018-09-24T16:18:58+12:00 2018-09-24T16:18:58+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7902&p=37881#p37881 <![CDATA[Birding Events :: Re: Chatham Island :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-09-26T10:18:27+12:00 2018-09-26T10:18:27+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7902&p=37900#p37900 <![CDATA[Birding Events :: Re: Pelagic - Otago Canyon Sat- Sept 29th. :: Reply by Steve Wood]]> 2018-09-27T16:45:50+12:00 2018-09-27T16:45:50+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7861&p=37905#p37905
So Sat is not looking the best - 25 knots and rough sea, improving Sunday North west 15 knots slight SW swell is the forecast to date.

So SUNDAY is our Day. - Meet the "Vivienne J" at Carey's Bay 7.15 am for 7:30 departure.

Payment - $154. P/P. to my account please. BNZ - 02-0692-0042921-066.

My Ph.0272449703.

Cheers

Steve.]]>

So Sat is not looking the best - 25 knots and rough sea, improving Sunday North west 15 knots slight SW swell is the forecast to date.

So SUNDAY is our Day. - Meet the "Vivienne J" at Carey's Bay 7.15 am for 7:30 departure.

Payment - $154. P/P. to my account please. BNZ - 02-0692-0042921-066.

My Ph.0272449703.

Cheers

Steve.]]>
<![CDATA[Birding Events :: Re: Pelagic - Otago Canyon Sat- Sept 29th. :: Reply by Steve Wood]]> 2018-09-27T17:18:49+12:00 2018-09-27T17:18:49+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7861&p=37906#p37906
Steve.]]>

Steve.]]>
<![CDATA[Birding Events :: Re: Pelagic - Otago Canyon Sat- Sept 29th. :: Reply by kengeorge]]> 2018-09-28T19:47:24+12:00 2018-09-28T19:47:24+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7861&p=37917#p37917 <![CDATA[Birding Events :: Re: Pelagic - Otago Canyon Sat- Sept 29th. :: Reply by Richard Schofield]]> 2018-10-01T13:18:03+13:00 2018-10-01T13:18:03+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7861&p=37936#p37936 cluthaphotos@gmail.com.

Cheers, Richard]]>
cluthaphotos@gmail.com.

Cheers, Richard]]>
<![CDATA[Birding Events :: Re: Pelagic - Otago Canyon Sat- Sept 29th. :: Reply by kengeorge]]> 2018-10-01T14:44:32+13:00 2018-10-01T14:44:32+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7861&p=37937#p37937

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Otago Canyons Pelagic 30 Sept 2018.JPG (73.85 KiB)


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Otago Canyons Pelagic 30 Sept 2018.JPG (73.85 KiB)


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<![CDATA[Birding Events :: Re: Pelagic - Otago Canyon Sat- Sept 29th. :: Reply by Tim Barnard]]> 2018-10-01T15:06:29+13:00 2018-10-01T15:06:29+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7861&p=37938#p37938 Good times.
Tim]]>
Good times.
Tim]]>
<![CDATA[Birding Events :: Re: Pelagic - Otago Canyon Sat- Sept 29th. :: Reply by Oscar Thomas]]> 2018-10-01T16:49:09+13:00 2018-10-01T16:49:09+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7861&p=37940#p37940 <![CDATA[Birding Events :: Re: Pelagic - Otago Canyon Sat- Sept 29th. :: Reply by Steve Wood]]> 2018-10-02T10:03:45+13:00 2018-10-02T10:03:45+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7861&p=37943#p37943 <![CDATA[Birding Events :: Re: Pelagic - Otago Canyon Sat- Sept 29th. :: Reply by Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-10-02T21:01:03+13:00 2018-10-02T21:01:03+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7861&p=37952#p37952 viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7956
Nice whale shots!]]>
viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7956
Nice whale shots!]]>
<![CDATA[Birding Events :: Golden Bay Big Day 2018 :: Author kengeorge]]> 2018-09-24T05:49:28+12:00 2018-09-24T05:49:28+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7946&p=37874#p37874 http://www.farewellspit.com) has proposed the idea of a Golden Bay Big Day, provisionally the weekend 3rd and 4th November. A small team of local birders (including myself) did a Big Day here in Golden Bay on Labour Weekend 3 years ago. We only did a daylight hours day (about 9 hours- no nocturnals) and ticked 59 species just by driving around the Bay. Our Big Day also did not include a run out onto Farewell Spit, where we could have potentially picked up another 6-10 species. For birders, Golden Bay is ideal because of the proximity of native and beech forest, scrub, farmland, lakes, ponds, gravel roads, coastal and estuaries, plus Farewell Spit and other nearby wader roosting areas (Tomatea Point and Rototai). If you were really hardcore, you could also hike part way up the Heaphy and tick Takahe and Great Spotted Kiwi! I have lived here in Golden Bay and birded the local area extensively since 2009, and I would provide everybody with my Golden Bay location guide. The Big Day proposal would be to run the day from noon on Saturday 3rd November thru to noon Sunday 4th, ending in Collingwood for a species count, team ticks and refreshments. Paddy would run dedicated birding trips out onto the Spit on both days, depending on the tides. Running it from noon till noon would give people the chance to get over into Golden Bay on Saturday morning, an easy 2 hour drive from Nelson airport. To keep this Big Day consistent with other NZ regions, the rules would follow the excellent summary posted by Russell Cannings elsewhere on the Birding NZ site. Before Paddy and I proceed any further with planning the event, would anybody be keen to come over and have a crack at it? As I mentioned above, the current best tally is 59 species, some of you top birders should be able to push that out to 70 and above. Cheers all, Ken George.]]> http://www.farewellspit.com) has proposed the idea of a Golden Bay Big Day, provisionally the weekend 3rd and 4th November. A small team of local birders (including myself) did a Big Day here in Golden Bay on Labour Weekend 3 years ago. We only did a daylight hours day (about 9 hours- no nocturnals) and ticked 59 species just by driving around the Bay. Our Big Day also did not include a run out onto Farewell Spit, where we could have potentially picked up another 6-10 species. For birders, Golden Bay is ideal because of the proximity of native and beech forest, scrub, farmland, lakes, ponds, gravel roads, coastal and estuaries, plus Farewell Spit and other nearby wader roosting areas (Tomatea Point and Rototai). If you were really hardcore, you could also hike part way up the Heaphy and tick Takahe and Great Spotted Kiwi! I have lived here in Golden Bay and birded the local area extensively since 2009, and I would provide everybody with my Golden Bay location guide. The Big Day proposal would be to run the day from noon on Saturday 3rd November thru to noon Sunday 4th, ending in Collingwood for a species count, team ticks and refreshments. Paddy would run dedicated birding trips out onto the Spit on both days, depending on the tides. Running it from noon till noon would give people the chance to get over into Golden Bay on Saturday morning, an easy 2 hour drive from Nelson airport. To keep this Big Day consistent with other NZ regions, the rules would follow the excellent summary posted by Russell Cannings elsewhere on the Birding NZ site. Before Paddy and I proceed any further with planning the event, would anybody be keen to come over and have a crack at it? As I mentioned above, the current best tally is 59 species, some of you top birders should be able to push that out to 70 and above. Cheers all, Ken George.]]> <![CDATA[Birding Events :: Re: Golden Bay Big Day 2018 :: Reply by RussCannings]]> 2018-09-24T18:07:39+12:00 2018-09-24T18:07:39+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7946&p=37884#p37884
That sounds like a great idea and I would certainly be interested in future years (even better if on a long weekend or school holidays), however I'm anticipating the birth of my first child around then so probably not allowed! ;)

Hope it works out as that's a tremendous corner of the country and having all competitors in the same area in the same day certainly adds a great element that is tricky to achieve in more national competitions.

Russ]]>

That sounds like a great idea and I would certainly be interested in future years (even better if on a long weekend or school holidays), however I'm anticipating the birth of my first child around then so probably not allowed! ;)

Hope it works out as that's a tremendous corner of the country and having all competitors in the same area in the same day certainly adds a great element that is tricky to achieve in more national competitions.

Russ]]>
<![CDATA[Birding Events :: Re: Golden Bay Big Day 2018 :: Reply by kengeorge]]> 2018-09-25T12:05:51+12:00 2018-09-25T12:05:51+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7946&p=37892#p37892 All the best with the family addition, that'll rein in the birding activity a bit.......
Cheers
Ken]]>
All the best with the family addition, that'll rein in the birding activity a bit.......
Cheers
Ken]]>
<![CDATA[Birding Events :: Re: Golden Bay Big Day 2018 :: Reply by kengeorge]]> 2018-10-16T11:48:07+13:00 2018-10-16T11:48:07+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7946&p=38059#p38059
Ken]]>

Ken]]>
<![CDATA[Birding Events :: Lower Waikato River swamp bird counts next 3 Saturdays :: Author Ian Southey]]> 2018-10-19T05:14:51+13:00 2018-10-19T05:14:51+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7981&p=38089#p38089
Moderate bird knowledge is sufficient as it will be focussed on key species - crakes, fernbird, bittern with 5 minute bird counts to cover other species. Difficulty is either not very with easy walking access along stopbanks or not particularly easy at all on the islands with dense vegetation, uneven footing, vines, soft mud and water up to about knee deep. The worst site for access is really good swamp forest with good birds so there should be reward for pain. Access to count lines is by driving, on foot or by small boat.

We do two kinds of counts.
1. Morning counts. Meet at Hood's Landing at 8.00 am and head out to count lines with 6 count sites each with a 5 minute bird count and playback for Spotless Crake and Fernbird. Counting to finish at midday.

2. Evening counts. Meet at Hood's Landing at 6.00 pm and head out to sites by vehicle and foot or by small boat to do a stationary count focussing on booming bitterns and arriving back about 9.00 pm.

Hood's Landing is at the end of Hood's Landing Rd south of Otaua which is south of Waiuku.

If you are interested in either or both of these jobs please contact me at iansouthey@yahoo.co.nz for further information and a gear list.

Thanks, Ian]]>

Moderate bird knowledge is sufficient as it will be focussed on key species - crakes, fernbird, bittern with 5 minute bird counts to cover other species. Difficulty is either not very with easy walking access along stopbanks or not particularly easy at all on the islands with dense vegetation, uneven footing, vines, soft mud and water up to about knee deep. The worst site for access is really good swamp forest with good birds so there should be reward for pain. Access to count lines is by driving, on foot or by small boat.

We do two kinds of counts.
1. Morning counts. Meet at Hood's Landing at 8.00 am and head out to count lines with 6 count sites each with a 5 minute bird count and playback for Spotless Crake and Fernbird. Counting to finish at midday.

2. Evening counts. Meet at Hood's Landing at 6.00 pm and head out to sites by vehicle and foot or by small boat to do a stationary count focussing on booming bitterns and arriving back about 9.00 pm.

Hood's Landing is at the end of Hood's Landing Rd south of Otaua which is south of Waiuku.

If you are interested in either or both of these jobs please contact me at iansouthey@yahoo.co.nz for further information and a gear list.

Thanks, Ian]]>
<![CDATA[Bird Taxonomy and Nomenclature :: Elephant birds :: Author Neil Fitzgerald]]> 2018-09-26T19:30:30+12:00 2018-09-26T19:30:30+12:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=7950&p=37903#p37903 https://amp.livescience.com/63675-world ... titan.html
The link to the source publication seems to be broken. Maybe try again later.]]>
https://amp.livescience.com/63675-world ... titan.html
The link to the source publication seems to be broken. Maybe try again later.]]>
<![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Re: Southern Elephant Seal, Ngawi/Cape Palliser :: Reply by Michael Szabo]]> 2018-10-02T12:26:11+13:00 2018-10-02T12:26:11+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=7943&p=37945#p37945 <![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Leopard Seal - Awarua Bay, Southland :: Author Phil Rhodes]]> 2018-10-06T13:33:47+13:00 2018-10-06T13:33:47+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=7962&p=37975#p37975 <![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Re: Leopard Seal - Awarua Bay, Southland :: Reply by Matt Jones]]> 2018-10-06T19:20:39+13:00 2018-10-06T19:20:39+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=7962&p=37981#p37981 And then there is a much larger healthier looking Leopard Seal on the north end of Horseshoe beach.
Cheers

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Leopard Seal on Stewart Island
IMG_4138.jpg (256.66 KiB)
Leopard Seal on Stewart Island

Leopard Seal on Stewart Island
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Leopard Seal on Stewart Island

Leopard Seal on Stewart Island
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Leopard Seal on Stewart Island

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And then there is a much larger healthier looking Leopard Seal on the north end of Horseshoe beach.
Cheers

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Leopard Seal on Stewart Island
IMG_4138.jpg (256.66 KiB)
Leopard Seal on Stewart Island

Leopard Seal on Stewart Island
IMG_4119.jpg (257.53 KiB)
Leopard Seal on Stewart Island

Leopard Seal on Stewart Island
IMG_4035.jpg (294.01 KiB)
Leopard Seal on Stewart Island

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<![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Weta rescue :: Author flossiepip]]> 2018-10-07T11:51:43+13:00 2018-10-07T11:51:43+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=7966&p=37987#p37987 PA063854_1.JPG
PA063854_1.JPG

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PA063884_1.JPG (180.1 KiB)


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PA063854_1.JPG
PA063854_1.JPG

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PA063884_1.JPG (180.1 KiB)


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<![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Re: Weta rescue :: Reply by Davidthomas]]> 2018-10-08T07:18:16+13:00 2018-10-08T07:18:16+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=7966&p=37991#p37991 <![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Re: Weta rescue :: Reply by David Riddell]]> 2018-10-08T08:33:39+13:00 2018-10-08T08:33:39+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=7966&p=37993#p37993 <![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Re: Weta rescue :: Reply by flossiepip]]> 2018-10-08T08:45:40+13:00 2018-10-08T08:45:40+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=7966&p=37994#p37994 <![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Re: Weta rescue :: Reply by Olwen]]> 2018-10-09T20:49:46+13:00 2018-10-09T20:49:46+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=7966&p=38010#p38010 <![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Re: Tiger leech :: Reply by Shane]]> 2018-10-14T15:00:50+13:00 2018-10-14T15:00:50+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=3423&p=38049#p38049 <![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Leopard Seal, Petone Beach :: Author Michael Szabo]]> 2018-10-14T19:23:37+13:00 2018-10-14T19:23:37+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=7972&p=38051#p38051
Link to photo: https://scontent.fpmr1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/ ... e=5C4609E7]]>

Link to photo: https://scontent.fpmr1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/ ... e=5C4609E7]]>
<![CDATA[Other Natural History :: Re: Leopard Seal, Petone Beach :: Reply by Hypno]]> 2018-10-19T14:29:54+13:00 2018-10-19T14:29:54+13:00 https://www.birdingnz.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=7972&p=38091#p38091