Fairy tern on the brink

General birdwatching discussion, help with bird identification, and all other things relating to wild birds and birding in NZ that don't fit in one of the other forums.
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TheBirderman
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Re: Fairy tern on the brink

Postby TheBirderman » Sat Mar 02, 2019 4:11 pm

We all know the culprit, whether you believe it or not, Climate Change.
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zarkov
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Re: Fairy tern on the brink

Postby zarkov » Thu Mar 07, 2019 7:58 pm

Climate change is often used as an excuse for stuff we don't understand, for example in what way has climate change impacted on Fairy Terns?

Maybe it's fishing practices, or predators and human impact on eastern sand spits, which definitely makes life hard for Godwits in NZ.

Some species would appear to be doing well in spite of climate change, Spur Wings and Paradise ducks unfortunately seem to thrive on it, but it's probably more likely our farming and urbanization that's the cause.

Climate change is blamed for all sorts problems in low lying pacific nations, but the main cause is over-population, Kiribati is one of the most densely populated places on Earth: https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-26017336

Over-population is the basic cause of climate change, it's the elephant in the room.

Getting rid of plastic bags might make us feel good, but it's just bullshit really.
Ian Southey
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Re: Fairy tern on the brink

Postby Ian Southey » Fri Mar 08, 2019 4:14 am

Zarkov

I think that was a joke .

What is not to understand here? Can you really overlook the removal of a large chunk what was probably one of the largest primary producers in an ecosystem and a particular habitat in its own right? It's not like fishing practice, human impacts or predators have changed during the time period in question. In fact the fairy tern wardens manage the last two well and there has always been a lot of fishing in the harbour.

The whole point about stuff you don't know is to figure it out so you don't make too many stupid mistakes. Timing wise the mangrove removal is an exact fit so I'm starting there.

Ian
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Michael Szabo
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Re: Fairy tern on the brink

Postby Michael Szabo » Fri Mar 08, 2019 9:07 am

I agree with Neil and Ian. If native mangrove removal is the straw that breaks the camel's back, then perhaps people should be replanting mangroves for NZ Fairy Terns where the last few pairs are clinging on, rather than removing native mangroves. That would also have benefits out into the wider marine ecosystem, such as acting as spawning and nursery habitat for fish.

The 'human overpopulation causes climate change' argument ignores the elephant in the room, which is demonstrable unequal distribution and consumption of energy and resources. US per capita energy and resource consumption is far higher than per capita energy and resource use in the Pacific Islands, including Kiribati. Not all humans have the same environmental footprint and, therefore, the same impact on the climate.
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zarkov
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Re: Fairy tern on the brink

Postby zarkov » Mon Mar 11, 2019 8:37 pm

Unequal use of energy isn't an elephant in the room, it's common knowledge, and one of the reasons developing nations give for increasing their own energy use. They want to be developed nations like US with all that implies, and fair enough.

Getting the US to decrease it's emissions etc would help, but if India and China continue to increase theirs, it won't make a blind bit of difference, the global total will increase. The numbers coming out of those two countries alone make the debate moot.

https://www.radionz.co.nz/national/prog ... nto-a-hell

There's no credible reason why we need more people in this country, but the politics of growth aren't up for discussion.

Maybe Fairy Terns do like mangroves, but there's a whole lot more mangroves now than there ever were in the past, and it's done them little good as far as I can see.

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