Tutukaka Pelagic October 7.

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Les Feasey
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2016 1:03 pm

Re: Tutukaka Pelagic October 7.

Postby Les Feasey » Thu Oct 11, 2018 9:21 pm

Sorry all,
I was up at Parengarenga trying to find a godwit and missed the fun (and the godwit). Thanks for kicking in Igor and yes, I agree, there were loads of Little Shears, mostly in ones and twos or small groups but really constant from the Harbour to the Poor Knights. We were moving at pace in rough choppy seas so I couldn't stand, just hanging on, so missed out on photos.
In answer to your query, Sav, about other sites where there are lots of Little shears, I pretty sure I saw that once out of Whangaroa. They nest on Stephenson's islands and at certain times of year there are quite big numbers up there. They don't come near the boat so getting a photo is a trick. I see that Oscar did it, though.
Cheers,
Les Feasey
Opua, Far North
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ourspot
Posts: 143
Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2016 10:24 pm
Location: Tutukaka Coast

Re: Tutukaka Pelagic October 7.

Postby ourspot » Wed Oct 17, 2018 4:01 pm

Here's some details of the 'Little Shearwater' sightings so far on the various Tutukaka Pelagic Trips: 50 (7 Jul), 60 (21 Jul), 36 (24 Sep 17), 120 approx (7 Oct), and no sightings on the Jan, Feb and March trips earlier this year.

One great highlight of the recent pelagic trip was the interaction between a Wandering Albatross that sat off the back of the boat and a Blue Shark (which was approx 2.5 to 3 metres long). The albatross was not bothered by the shark, but always knew where it was. When the shark got close the albatross would just brush it away with it's foot. This went on for about an hour or so. At one stage the shark and the albatross were having a little tug of war over a piece of squid – don't know if anyone managed a shot of this (I didn't) but it was an amazing sight.

Cheers Scott
Wandering Albatross & Blue Shark_Tutukaka Pelagic_Oct18_FB_IMG_2441.jpg
Wandering Albatross & Blue Shark_Tutukaka Pelagic_Oct18_FB_IMG_2441.jpg (491.52 KiB) Viewed 225 times
Tim Barnard
Posts: 267
Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2016 7:30 pm
Location: Okere Falls

Re: Tutukaka Pelagic October 7.

Postby Tim Barnard » Wed Oct 17, 2018 6:11 pm

Hey Scott
I can remember a very similar encounter off Tologa Bay back in the day. It was quite tense for a time - we weren't too sure how it was going to play out. The Alby even delivered a peck to the nose before eventually getting tired of the attention and flying off ...
No doubt a stand off that has played out for a very long time ...
Cheers
Tim
Graeme T
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 2:17 pm

Re: Tutukaka Pelagic October 7.

Postby Graeme T » Wed Oct 24, 2018 1:00 pm

Regarding the numbers of Little shearwaters seen in the outer Hauraki Gulf. This species is quite common on most of the outer islands in the Hauraki Gulf (Hen and Chickens, Poor Knights, Mokohinau islands) as well as the Mercury and Alderman Islands in Bay of Plenty. The numbers in New Zealand will be increasing at pace now. Previously Pacific rats (kiore) ate most of the eggs and chicks but with their removal from the majority of offshore breeding islands, breeding success has increased to over 80% per annum. Hence the sightings at sea should be on the rise. Fluttering shearwaters dive down to 30m in shallower inshore seas, often reaching the seabed. They also feed around large fish shoals. By contrast Little shearwaters are more common over deeper water finding krill and fish in upwelling zones. Normally they feed as singles or in small groups. After breeding finishes in Nov/Dec they move south and east to the subtropical convergence foraging along this frontal zone between the warm and cold water masses well east of the Chatham Islands and almost across to South America. They are mainly absent from New Zealand seas from Jan to March. The birds start coming back to colonies from mid-April through to June and egg laying is anytime from July to September.
Cheers
Graeme
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zarkov
Posts: 539
Joined: Sun Feb 14, 2010 3:54 pm
Location: Torbay.

Re: Tutukaka Pelagic October 7.

Postby zarkov » Wed Oct 24, 2018 4:34 pm

Tim Barnard wrote:Hey Scott
I can remember a very similar encounter off Tologa Bay back in the day. It was quite tense for a time - we weren't too sure how it was going to play out. The Alby even delivered a peck to the nose before eventually getting tired of the attention and flying off ...
No doubt a stand off that has played out for a very long time ...
Cheers
Tim


On a Stewart Island pelagic earlier this year I saw a whole flock of sea birds suddenly lift off a chum bag for no apparent reason.

The experienced skipper said they'd probably seen a shark, so presumably Stewart island sharks are to be taken more seriously than Tutukaka or Tolaga bay sharks.

I know I'd lift off if I saw a shark down there.

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