Cape Barren goose

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Mandyjane
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Re: Cape Barren goose

Postby Mandyjane » Thu Mar 19, 2015 7:21 pm

Did anyone actually say that ? I re read the posts a couple of times, and I dont think anyone really suggested either .. I'm guessing you dont like them much :-( I would still like to see one......
Jan
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Re: Cape Barren goose

Postby Jan » Fri Mar 20, 2015 8:46 am

Sav knows quite well that Cape barren Geese have a self-sustaining population at St. Annes Lagoon in Canterbury, where nests can sometimes be seen. This population started from a few birds bred at Peacock Springs being released at the lagoon in the 1980s. Of course this doesn't make them vagrants and in The Field Guide they are a Rare Australian Introduction.
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sav
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Re: Cape Barren goose

Postby sav » Fri Mar 20, 2015 9:47 am

Certainly happy to accept that the St Annes Lagoon, and Stephenson Island, populations are self-sustaining and long established (still "plastic" though Paul!).
But the fact is that people DO report (or at least have recently reported) them as vagrants - eg 2 records assessed by the OSNZ Records Appraisal Committee in 2012.
And for the record, I think they are quite smart things - and in their homeland really rather cool.
cheers
Sav Saville
Wrybill Birding Tours, NZ
Great Birds, Real Birders
Paul G

Re: Cape Barren goose

Postby Paul G » Fri Mar 20, 2015 10:07 am

sav wrote:people DO report them as vagrants - eg 2 records assessed by the OSNZ Records Appraisal Committee in 2012.

Ah well, that explains your comments then, Sav. Thanks for explaining.
But nobody else would know about that unless they're a member of the Rarities Committee, hence the surprise shown by some of us.

I hope very much that Colin Miskelly is able to progress his excellent plan to launch a web site that will be open to all, and will list submissions as-and-when they're received, and will update the progress, decisions and reasons for decisions.
This will address the lack of information and the confusion that you've just witnessed, and may bring the work of
the RAC 'out of the shadows' and into the spotlight of mainstream birding.

It's an important part of our birding scene, and the work that you guys do is highly valued. Thanks for giving your time.
I for one, would much appreciate being able to monitor the progress of records and the observe the decision-making process.
Bring it on.

cheers
Paul
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RussCannings
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Re: Cape Barren goose

Postby RussCannings » Fri Mar 20, 2015 11:41 am

This is from NZ Birds Online which uses the phrase "considered vagrants" twice:

"The Cape Barren goose is endemic to Australia and was introduced into New Zealand unsuccessfully at least three times between 1869 and 1874. Six birds released in 1914-15 at Lakes Hawea and Wanaka resulted in a small breeding population that persisted until 1946. Birds recorded elsewhere during or soon after that – Lake Thompson (1934), Loch Maree (March 1947) and Lake Hankinson (June 1947) – may have come from this population. Nevertheless, because of the remoteness of these locations and the unsuitability for geese of the surrounding forest habitat, these birds have been considered vagrants from Australia, even though the species there does not normally fly long distances. Some later records – around Lakes Waitaki and Benmore (May 1966), Sutherland Sound (early 1967), and South Auckland (December 1985) – have also been considered vagrants. Most recent records are almost certainly released or escaped captive birds."
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Neil Fitzgerald
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Re: Cape Barren goose

Postby Neil Fitzgerald » Fri Mar 20, 2015 1:44 pm

sav wrote:It has no long distance migration, and no proven vagrancy within Australia.


Have all vagrants to NZ fitted these criteria?
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sav
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Re: Cape Barren goose

Postby sav » Fri Mar 20, 2015 3:06 pm

No, but it is something that ought to be considered. If a species is commonly kept in captivity in NZ, and has no "vagrancy potentiel" eg Crested Pigeon, Cape Barren Goose, then the chances of it occurring in a truly wild state are immensely slim compared to the chances of it being escaped/released.
Mapgie-lark and Willie Wagtail are wonderful exceptions to any rule, but I submit they are not in captivity here. Assisted passage on ships is another issue (can of worms?).
cheers
Sav Saville
Wrybill Birding Tours, NZ
Great Birds, Real Birders
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Neil Fitzgerald
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Re: Cape Barren goose

Postby Neil Fitzgerald » Sun Mar 22, 2015 9:16 pm

Considered, of course, as should genuine vagrant. They are vastly more conspicuous than some of the LBJs that have been recorded here, by virtue of their size, appearance, and the open type of habitat they frequent. No?
Something like a CBG got to NZ just 20 million years or so ago and became the NZ geese ;)
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RussCannings
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Re: Cape Barren goose

Postby RussCannings » Wed Mar 06, 2019 8:30 am

On Sunday there was a single Cape Barren Goose in a paddock beside a pond near 1623 Dairy Flat Hwy (not far from Silverdale). Hard to say whether it is one of these 2 males mentioned by Paul or just another farm pet.

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